Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests

by Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, Int
Play Video
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests
Help Farmers Rear Silk Moths to Restore Forests

Project Report | Sep 30, 2021
Dyeing with fruits, flowers, lichens and leaves

By Catherine Craig | President, CPALI

Mangousta skin is used to make the black dye
Mangousta skin is used to make the black dye

The SEPALIM team is continuing to expand on it experiments making textile plant dyes.  Some dyes are made from fruits purchased at the market and some are from plants that they gather and subsequently garden. The beautiful purple-black dye that is the background of photograph 1 is from the tropical fruit trees in genus, Garcinia.  The common Malagasy name is Mangosta.  The tree native to countries around the Indian Ocean and has been introduced in South America and Florida.  Mangosta is a slow growing tree and the fruit is harvested in April. The pulp surrounding the seeds is delicious and dyes are made from the fleshy shell.

Ampalibe is the Malagasy name for Jackfruit.  Although it is a native of India it is grown in Madagascar. ue-black) It is remarkable for its large size; it is the largest know fruit and can get up to 80 lbs (35kg). In addition to its beautiful color, it is packed with nutrient and Lalaina has been experimenting with making jackfruit flour for baking!  The fruit is harvested in May, June and October.  The fruit tastes like a combination of apples, mangoes, pineapple and banana.

Lichens, Olagoaka in Malagasy, are used to make the warm brown and orange dyes for Bombyx and Ceranchia silks.  They are harvested during the rain period January through April and is sold for 5000 Ar/kilo  (about $2.00) for its medicinal properties.  The lichens are a parasites of coconut trees and removing the lichen is beneficial to the tree.  People in Madagascar use this species to treat indigestion.

The team is continuing to experiment with new plants - stay tuned for results with Indigofera (light blue), Clidemia (black) and Folera mena (military green).

Jackfruit dyes Bombyx silk bright yellow
Jackfruit dyes Bombyx silk bright yellow
Lichens yield beautiful browns and oranges
Lichens yield beautiful browns and oranges

Links:

Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

About Project Reports

Project reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you can recieve an email when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports without donating.

Sign up for updates

Organization Information

Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, Int

Location: Walla Walla, WA - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Catherine Craig

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Get incredible stories, promotions, and matching offers in your inbox

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.