Equip deafblind children with skills for life!

by St. Nicholas' Home, Penang
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Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Equip deafblind children with skills for life!
Thurga being trained to wash her hands after meal
Thurga being trained to wash her hands after meal

Thurga first came to St Nicholas’ Home in 2012. Coming from a family of four and as far as Johor Bahru, the most southern part of Malaysia, it has been a long journey of success for her here in St Nicholas’ Home Penang. Thurga was born with congenital blindness, mental retardation and autism. Before stepping foot to SNH, Thurga was pampered a lot at home. She was still wearing diapers as she did not have the proper toilet training. She was having difficulties doing daily activities on her own such as eating, dressing herself and wearing shoes. However, she was able to walk around without any help. When placed in an uncomfortable situation, she would make noises and throw tantrums.

All that changed when her parents decided to send her to St Nicholas’ Home, Penang. Within a year, she changed tremendously. More attention was given towards enhancing her skills in tactual sense, cognitive, living skills and motor skills and Thurga became better each day. Now, with the training received from the Deaf, Blind & Multi-Handicapped programme, Thurga is able to wear clothes and shoes on her own when she receives a verbal command. She is now able to move around from her dorm to her classroom and dining hall. Thurga also recognises her housemothers, teachers and friends’ voice when they talk to her. She has also become more energetic and lively as she demonstrates it through her new found love of music and dance. In class, she is able to do tactual puzzles and explore the different shapes and sizes of the tactual board. She is also able to recognise her both hands, other body parts and name them. She is now beginning to repeat words that she has learned from her teachers which indicate her learning progress.

The Deaf, Blind and Multi Handicapped Programme in St.Nicholas’ Home aims to provide a full range of educational service and training to achieve full potential and ability to be independent. The visually impaired children who are part of the programme are basically equipped with useful daily living, motor, mobility, communication and academic skills. They range from the age of 7 to 18 years old. Each child usually has an Individual Education Plan depending on their needs. Stimulation activities are carried out to achieve significant impact on the students’ learning experiences too. These children have benefited from the programme and are continuing to do so. Thurga is one of those visually impaired kids.

Being a Non-Governmental Organisation, St.Nicholas’ Home has been facing problems with sourcing funds for these kids and to ensure the continuity of the remarkable programme. The deficit in funds are one of the reasons why more and more improvements are not being executed successfully for the programme such as buying new puzzles or even to teach them Braille. This is where the home depends on the public for their generosity to equip these kids with skills for life.

The kids may be blind but are definitely St Nicholas’ Home’s shining stars and the same goes to Thurga. As her star continues to shine at St Nicholas’ Home, we would like thank you for your generous contribution to our DBMH programme and for making a change in the lives of these children!

Thurga now holds the cup and drinks on her own
Thurga now holds the cup and drinks on her own
Thurga is already able to eat independently
Thurga is already able to eat independently
Thurga learning in the DBMH Class
Thurga learning in the DBMH Class

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Chee Cheong
Chee Cheong

Since enrolling in the DBMH program, Ng Chee Chong has transformed to become one of the most active children
in the program as he always likes to move and jump around cheerfully. He seems to be on cloud nine all the time. He enjoys being cuddled by the teachers and housemothers and has very high spirits in doing classroom activities. Chee Chong has also improved in his speech delivery as he is able to answer more questions during circle time. Besides that, he enjoys listening to the music and is also capable of dancing according to the tune. He usually does this in the toy library. He is also very good at following the lyrics of the songs but mostly the pronunciation and utterance of the words will be different from the real word. For now, the most common song that he always sings is, Three Blind Mice which sounds more like “chee bind mice”!

Chee Chong has become independent in managing his daily routine and he is more aware of all the things that need to be done regularly. In the dormitory, he is able to identify his clothes and wear it on his own with very little assistance from the housemothers. He is also very good at applying powder all over his body and face evenly and he enjoys the pleasant smell of the powder and he usually says, “hmmm…Wangi (fragrant)…”. Chee Chong has also learnt to wash his hands independently without being told and assisted by the teacher after using the washroom. Immediately after washing his hands, he looks out for the towel to wipe his hands.These actions show an enormous improvement in Chee Chong.


In the classroom, Chee Chong is in the midst of familiarising himself with the Brailler. He is being taught on the
ways to load and unload paper from the Brailler. He is also in the process of learning Pre-Braille Tactual Discrimination activity whereby it involves sensory training which actually helps him to develop his finger dexterity. This training would eventually help him to recognize the Braille dots and lead him to read Braille alphabets accurately later on.

Chee Chong has also learnt to climb stairs on his own without being assisted by the teachers. He is able to hold
the stair’s railing and climb one step at a time and at the same time he will be counting the number of steps. Besides that, Chee Chong has also shown improvement in his pre-vocational skills whereby he is capable of doing
packing. He takes one plastic and places one button in. Once he is done, he places the packed button in another basket. This shows that he understands the process of packaging.        


These achievements show that the DBMH program is improving the lives of these children and we would like to once again convey our sincere gratitude for all your generous contributions!

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His wrist bones are deformed. His thumbs do not function at all. He would bite his caregivers if he was uncomfortable. He would roll around on the floor and throw tantrums. That was Muhammad Eisma Daniel two years ago.

Today, Daniel is a changed boy, all thanks to the training he received in the DBMH program at St Nicholas Home. These days, though he still does not talk much and communicates mostly through touch and sound, he still smiles and approaches his caregivers to give kisses when he approves of something.

Daniel has learnt to adapt to using only four fingers on each hand, eats and drinks independently and is slowly learning how to rinse his utensils with the help of his teachers. He is also very accurate in his sense of direction and no longer needs help or guidance to walk to his class. “Daniel has very good concentration and retention and we do not have to repeat it many times,” his teacher comments proudly.  

We at St Nicholas Home are very proud of Daniel’s good progress and with donations pouring in through Global Giving; we can continue to help Daniel and other children in the DBMH program towards improving their lives for a bigger and brighter future! Therefore, we would like to thank all our contributors for your support and donations.

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Standing at 165cm tall and weighing almost 90kg, Yashvanthan s/o Rajendran may be big in size but in reality, is as gentle as a mouse could be. Yash, as he is known to all, was diagnosed with severe visual impairment (retinitis pigmentosa in both eyes) and was found to be mentally challenged, displaying some autistic features.

His father is a hawker while his mother works as an operator at a factory here. He has a brother Mugilan, who is also visually impaired, working at the Wellness Center as a masseur.

As Yash is slightly autistic, he can be a little bit shy, refusing eye contact and not speaking to people. However, surprisingly, despite his shy personality, his gentleman side prevailed right from the start! He is always ever ready to greet the people he knows by taking their hands and sometimes kissing them (sometimes with a loud smooch) like a gentleman, before slowly easing away to return to what he was doing.

Since enrolling in the DBMH program, his speech and understanding has improved and he can also return envelopes to the appeals department on his own. However, Yash vast improvement in motor skills was a total surprise to his teachers, “Instead of threading only one bead at a time, he managed to thread 5 beads at one go!” exclaimed one of his teachers. His steady improvements have enabled him to become more independent as well.

Enrolling in SNH’s DBMH program has certainly changed Yashvanthan’s life and with the donations received through Global Giving, we can look forward towards improving the lives of the other children in the Deaf, Blind and Multi-Handicapped program.

Our sincerest gratitude goes out to you for your generous donations. Thank you for your continued support and compassion.

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Siti was diagnosed at the age of 8 with Global Development Delay ( a medical condition which causes delays in all areas of a child’s development). Siti’ s  growth is lagging and stunted; so she is no bigger than a normal person  3-4 year –old child. Siti was also born with no eyes and some facial deformities.

St. Nicholas’ Home came to know about Siti from the Social Welfare Department in mid 2008. Siti was 8 years of age then.  St. Nicholas subsequently include Siti in the Early Intervention Programme for half a year, before moving Siti to the Deaf – Blind & Multi- Handicapped Programme (DBMH) in 2009.

When Siti first arrived at the Home, she was not able to walk. She had lived with her grandfather in a small town. As both of them were practically living from hand to mouth, it was understandable that Siti was malnourished and weak when we first saw her. Through out her growing years her loving grandfather had carried her about thinking that Siti was immobile.

After 6 months at St. Nicholas’ Home, Siti had made significant improvement that changed her life. She had learnt to walk with the help of Home‘s dedicated teachers engage in the DBMH programme. Siti could walk confidently and with little help.

The Home fed her on a soft diet for a year before weaning Siti to solid food. In a short time, Siti had learnt to recognize teachers and staff by their  voices and could cheerfully address each of them loudly by name. Siti can now spell her name verbally. Everyday she eats and drinks on her own and dresses herself with minimum assistance.

Siti is the pride and joy of all of us here at the home as she blossoms and takes on learning daily living skills in big
strides!

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Organization Information

St. Nicholas' Home, Penang

Location: Georgetown, Penang - Malaysia
Website:
Project Leader:
Daniel Aik Bin Soon
Mr
Bagan Jermal, Penang Malaysia
$100,270 raised of $125,000 goal
 
1,275 donations
$24,730 to go
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