Mesoamerican Reef Fund (MAR Fund)

To inspire innovative, transnational solutions to critical Mesoamerican reef issues through providing meaningful, long-term financial support and trustworthy reef management advice so that future generations can enjoy and benefit from a thriving reef.
Jul 6, 2016

Hunting 2 save the reefs...derbies continue in Guatemala

hunting a predator
hunting a predator

As part of the extraction project developed by Mundo Azul Foundation and the Lionfish Strategy, the second derby of 2016 took place in the Guatemalan coasts, in Motagüilla site located in front of the river mouth of the Motagua River in Punta de Manabique, from March 8th through March 11th, with the participation of CONAP and community members from El Quetzalito.

Again we find ourselves in the Motagüilla site searching beneath rocks for this predator.

The morphometric measurements of each specimen caught were collected to keep track on the weight and size of each one, this information can be used in future studies of this species. As a result 8 lionfish specimens were caught, which were later used to create a new dish with the women from El Quetzalito community.

The difference in quantity caught between February and March, may be attributed to the changes in weather and current as well as the diminishing of the invaders because of the derbies. Further analysis to better understand lionfish behavior will be needed, as well as much more derbies.

Thank you for your support, we´ll keep you posted on how this story unravels.

measuring each specimen
measuring each specimen
creating a dish (women from El Quetzalito village)
creating a dish (women from El Quetzalito village)
Jun 21, 2016

Make them bigger keep them stronger

Buoys being moved in Mono Rojo site
Buoys being moved in Mono Rojo site

The Community Fisheries Program supports the active participation of organized groups of fisher men and women in fisheries management and recovery. Involving local community fishers has had a positive impact on being able to demarcate the fish recovery sites, a best practice that has proven to be an effective mechanism to restore and sustain ocean ecosystems.

As you all know, Punta de Manabique Wildlife Refuge, in Guatemala, has three fish recovery sites, two in La Graciosa Bay, Mono Rojo and Punta Gruesa, and one in Santa Isabel Lagoon. After two experts in the subject recommended moving the buoys to enlarge the fish recovery sites, a consensus took place between the National Council of Protected Areas -CONAP- entity that manages the area and the Community Development Committee -CODECO- from the communities of La Graciosa, Punta Gruesa and Santa Isabel. On March 29th-2016 two buoys from the fish recovery site in Mono Rojo and on May 18th-2016 two buoys in Punta Gruesa, located in La Graciosa Bay, were moved closer to the mangroves to enlarge the site which is a positive accomplishment within the area.

This only proves that the communities of fishers are willing and understand the importance of managing their resources in a sustainable way, ensuring the livelihoods of their future generations.

Having the communities understand the importance and benefits of fish recovery sites, keeping them informed and involved in the process will only help this initiative keep moving forward.

With your help, we have been able to promote and develop fish recovery sites throughout the region.

Thank you for your support.

Recovery Site Buoy
Recovery Site Buoy
Fishermen helping with the buoys
Fishermen helping with the buoys
fish recovery sites
fish recovery sites
Apr 15, 2016

Hunting a predator, 1st derby of 2016 in Guatemala

Derby product
Derby product

As part of the Lionfish Strategy, Mundo Azul Foundation developed an extraction project that aims to reduce and control the presence of lionfish in Guatemalan coasts. The first derby for 2016 was carried out in the site known as Motagüilla located in front of the river mouth of the Motagua River in Punta de Manabique, from February 15th through the 19th with the participation of the National Council of Protected Areas (CONAP) and community members from El Quetzalito.

Training was developed on best lionfish capture practices, harpoon use and safety as well as a cooking course was developed with the women in the community on handling and preparation of the fish. Before the actual derby took place, the team completed lionfish monitoring to determine the organisms density in the reef, information that will help create a baseline regarding lionfish presence in Guatemala.

As a result sixteen lionfish were hunted thanks to the support of nine divers. The amount caught was not much, but it has helped begin the creation of the database with information about this species.

One of the key factors was the participation of the community members, being able to involve them in the process and share knowledge on how to hunt and cook lionfish, as well as the benefit this brings to the reef and how its meat can be useful for their household, will provide them an alternative income once they fully manage the cooking techniques they can sell their dishes.

Bon Appetite!

With your support we are able to continue developing derbies and clear the coast from this invasive species.

community member hunting lionfish
community member hunting lionfish
 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $30
    give
  • $40
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $70
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $5,000
    give
  • $30
    each month
    give
  • $40
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $70
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $5,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.