Apply to Join
Jan 7, 2019

Moringa to support Kenyan Farmers Report

Introduction

Drylands Natural Resources Centre (DNRC) family sends holiday greetings to all of us. We hope this report finds all of us well. We are happy once again to share our progress report on Moringa to support Kenyan farmers healthy and wealth quarterly report. Your continued financial support has been of great benefit to our work. We can only say thank you so much. We continue to tirelessly work towards our ultimate goal and vision of sustainable and resilient communities in dryland through diversified tree planting and in cooperating both agro ecology and permaculture best practices. Since inception, DNRC has been keen on environmental regeneration, community strengthening as well as financial sustainability and now food security and majorly keen on the right diet for the farmer’s health.

Moringa oleifera tree is known for its nutritional supplement from the leaves. Over the years, we have promoted Moringa within the community and now every household has enough Moringa trees to harvest both leaves and seeds. Farmers have been trained how to harvest the leaves, clean them, and dry those under shade for quality Moringa leave powder. They have also been trained how they can use the fresh Moringa leaves as a vegetable too. Every season, farmers have more than enough leaves for their home powder and sale the extra for their income. A good number of farmers have confessed how Moringa powder has helped them health wise and how they cannot do a meal without the powder. As we indicated in our previous report, we continue to supply Moringa seeds to our international market so each family is making an income from the Moringa seeds.

During the reporting quarter, the following activities took place: Sourcing of Moringa seeds from our 700 smallholder farmers and getting them ready for the international market, close follow ups of our farmers in preparation to more planting of moringa trees in their farms, tending small moringa saplings in the DNRC tree nursery and issuance of moringa seedlings to the farmers to plant October-November rains. Below are detailed activities during the reporting quarter.

Moringa seeds Sourcing

During this reporting quarter, DNRC personnel were busy sourcing Moringa seeds from DNRC farmers, re-drying them and defeathering them as per the order specification. The order during this quarter was to supply 1000 kgs of Moringa seeds.

Tree nursery management

During the quarter, DNRC nursery staff were also working on the watering, weeding, manuring Moringa seedlings in the nursery.

Issuance

During October-December quarter, we were busy issuing moringa seedlings and other tree species from DNRC tree nursery. We averagely issued 10 moringa seedlings to each of our 700 farmers.

Challenges

Water remains our major challenge as we expand as no permanent water source at the site.

Next quarter plan

  • Developing annual work plans for 2019.
  • Farmer follow ups on the planted Moringa seedlings
  • Marketing of moringa products.
Jan 7, 2019

MORINGA TO SUPPORT KENYAN FARMERS HEALTHY AND WEALTH QUARTELY REPORT DEC- 2018

Introduction

Drylands Natural Resources Centre (DNRC) family sends holiday greetings to all of us. We hope this report finds all of us well. We are happy once again to share our progress report on Moringa to support Kenyan farmers healthy and wealth quarterly report. Your continued financial support has been of great benefit to our work. We can only say thank you so much. We continue to tirelessly work towards our ultimate goal and vision of sustainable and resilient communities in dryland through diversified tree planting and in cooperating both agro ecology and permaculture best practices. Since inception, DNRC has been keen on environmental regeneration, community strengthening as well as financial sustainability and now food security and majorly keen on the right diet for the farmer’s health.

Moringa oleifera tree is known for its nutritional supplement from the leaves. Over the years, we have promoted Moringa within the community and now every household has enough Moringa trees to harvest both leaves and seeds. Farmers have been trained how to harvest the leaves, clean them, and dry those under shade for quality Moringa leave powder. They have also been trained how they can use the fresh Moringa leaves as a vegetable too. Every season, farmers have more than enough leaves for their home powder and sale the extra for their income. A good number of farmers have confessed how Moringa powder has helped them health wise and how they cannot do a meal without the powder. As we indicated in our previous report, we continue to supply Moringa seeds to our international market so each family is making an income from the Moringa seeds.

During the reporting quarter, the following activities took place: Sourcing of Moringa seeds from our 700 smallholder farmers and getting them ready for the international market, close follow ups of our farmers in preparation to more planting of moringa trees in their farms, tending small moringa saplings in the DNRC tree nursery and issuance of moringa seedlings to the farmers to plant October-November rains. Below are detailed activities during the reporting quarter.

Moringa seeds Sourcing

During this reporting quarter, DNRC personnel were busy sourcing Moringa seeds from DNRC farmers, re-drying them and defeathering them as per the order specification. The order during this quarter was to supply 1000 kgs of Moringa seeds.

Tree nursery management

During the quarter, DNRC nursery staff were also working on the watering, weeding, manuring Moringa seedlings in the nursery.

Issuance

During October-December quarter, we were busy issuing moringa seedlings and other tree species from DNRC tree nursery. We averagely issued 10 moringa seedlings to each of our 700 farmers.

Challenges

Water remains our major challenge as we expand as no permanent water source at the site.

Next quarter plan

Developing annual work plans for 2019.

Farmer follow ups on the planted Moringa seedlings

Marketing of moringa products.

 
 
 
Dec 19, 2018

NUTRITION THROUGH FOOD FOREST AND GARDENS REPORT

Introduction

Dryland Natural Resources Centre Wish to send Christmas greetings to all of us. We are happy once more to write back and share our progress report on Nutrition through food forests and gardens in Kenya. As we continue to tirelessly work towards achieving our goals of environmental regeneration, community strengthening and economic sustainability through diverse tree planting, we are also keen on the right nutrition for the community. DNRC as the demonstration centre as well as the Community Resource Centre has been keen to set exemplary kitchen gardens as well as the food forests for both the community, schools, interns, visitors to learn from.

The food forests we have established with our first schools continue to flourish and the pupils together with the teachers continue to receive countless benefits ranging from fruits, firewood, tubers (sweetpatoes) etc. Farmers’ food forests are getting mature and they have started getting harvests of early maturity fruits like: paws paws, guavas and bananas etc. DNRC has continued to train farmers on kitchen gardens to increase diversity of the food supply from the food forests and slowly move the households towards food security as well as right nutrition. Farmers continue to benefit from the kitchen gardens they have established as well as selling the extra vegetables for income. “Kitchen garden has saved me the hassle of daily buying of vegetables and home grown vegetables are best for my heath since they have no chemical residues and also I sale some for income”. One farmer confessed. At DNRC both staff and visitors have continued to enjoy fruits from the food forest as well as vegetables from the gardens. We can only say thank you so much for your continued financial support. We look forward to continue this beneficial relationship.

During the reporting quarter, the following activities took place: preparing holes for the food forest expansion, planting food crops (Beans and cow peas) in the food forest, maintaining the old food forest and replanting the kitchen gardens at DNRC and in the farmers’ farms.

Below are detailed activities during the reporting quarter:

DNRC food forest

During the reporting quarter, DNRC personnel in charge of the food forest was busy working on the expansion of the food forest. He was involved with the following activities: Digging holes and treating and fertilising them with ash, dry matter and mature, planting of the new fruit trees as well as planting of the nitrogen fixer crops. He was also busy maintaining the old food forest. The activities included: pruning, mulching and manuring of trees. In terms of yield. During the reporting quarter we were able to harvest harvested 17.9 kgs of Bananas, 3kgs of pawpaw.

Kitchen gardens

During the reporting quarter, we were busy maintaining the existing gardens. Activities included: Constant spraying of organic concoctions to prevent pests and disease, weeding and top dressing the vegetables using earthworm juice. We were also engaged in installing new gardens.

 

Challenges

Water scarcity has always remains the biggest challenge for our activities in the DNRC due to lack of permanent water source. We depend on a seasonal river and use donkeys to fetch the water from the river.

Next quarter Focus

  • Developing annual work plans for 2019
  • Follow up farmers and school food forest and kitchen gardens
  • Maintain DNRC food forest including cultivating and pruning of trees
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.