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Dec 3, 2018

Getting There....

A happy child with a fixed Cleft Lip!
A happy child with a fixed Cleft Lip!

We are still moving slowly but surely, waiting for the big moment!  In May 2019 we will launch our first initiative - Awareness of Cleft Lip problem in Children.  However, this is not just an awareness we plan to perform at least 10 same day surgeries to be administered by our partners Smile Train NGO. 

Today we have started a launch to search for these young candidates and our role is to assess their physical ability to withstand a same day surgery.  We will provide nourishment where needed to get them ready for this big change in their lives.  We are so excited!  This is not an easy task, as the stigma surrounding this can be enormous and we must go with great compassion and sensitivity to the families involve.  We will get there we will succeed!

 What is Cleft Lip?

Globally, 1 in every 700 children are born with a cleft lip and/or palate. Clefts are the leading birth defect in many developing countries. A cleft occurs when certain body parts and structures do not

fuse together during fetal development. Clefts can involve the lip and/or the roof of the mouth,

which is made up of both hard and soft palate. In developing countries, the vast majority of children with clefts will never receive the reconstructive surgery they need.

How common are clefts?

There are varying opinions on the actual incidence of clefts, but most experts agree that, in part, it

depends on ethnicity. Some experts say that the highest cleft incidences are amongst Asians (approximately 1 in 500 births). Caucasians have an average incidence of 1 in 700 births and individuals of African descent have the lowest incidence of approximately 1 in 1,200 births.

What are the causes of cleft lip and palate?

No one knows exactly, but most experts agree that the causes of cleft lip and/or palate are multifactorial and may include a genetic predisposition as well as environmental issues such as drug and alcohol use, smoking, maternal illness, infections, or lack of Vitamin B, also known as folic acid. In most cases, it is not known what has caused a cleft lip and/or palate, but research is ongoing to better understand the condition.

What does it mean to be a child with an untreated cleft in a developing country?

Children with untreated clefts not only live in isolation, but also face physical difficulties with eating, breathing, hearing, and speaking. As a result, most of these children don't attend school or ever hold a job.

Can clefts be treated?

Reconstructive surgery for clefts has evolved over more than half a century, and today’s techniques and procedures have come a long way. The surgery today is simple and the transformation is immediate. Patients see their smile for the first time, parents cry tears of joy, and lives and communities are changed forever.

Your continuous donations will help acheive this cause - Thank you!

Sep 4, 2018

Still on the move!

Nothing like a happy baby!
Nothing like a happy baby!

This quarter we are still working hard to get quotes and third-party software companies to both print the Redbooks and build the Children’s Record Medical system, what we need to do is to ensure that as we give out the Redbooks to each parent and child care workers we have the back-up data in a system, just in case the Red books get lost.  It is our big challenge to achieve this, but we will!


Also, we are still working on the Cleft Lip Awareness event as we have now gained partnership with Smile Train... we will get this ball rolling.  

What is Cleft Lip?

Globally, 1 in every 700 children are born with a cleft lip and/or palate. Clefts are the leading birth defect in many developing countries. A cleft occurs when certain body parts and structures do not

fuse together during fetal development. Clefts can involve the lip and/or the roof of the mouth,

which is made up of both hard and soft palate. In developing countries, the vast majority of children with clefts will never receive the reconstructive surgery they need.

How common are clefts?

There are varying opinions on the actual incidence of clefts, but most experts agree that, in part, it

depends on ethnicity. Some experts say that the highest cleft incidences are amongst Asians (approximately 1 in 500 births). Caucasians have an average incidence of 1 in 700 births and individuals of African descent have the lowest incidence of approximately 1 in 1,200 births.

What are the causes of cleft lip and palate?

No one knows exactly, but most experts agree that the causes of cleft lip and/or palate are multifactorial and may include a genetic predisposition as well as environmental issues such as drug and alcohol use, smoking, maternal illness, infections, or lack of Vitamin B, also known as folic acid. In most cases, it is not known what has caused a cleft lip and/or palate, but research is ongoing to better understand the condition.

What does it mean to be a child with an untreated cleft in a developing country?

Children with untreated clefts not only live in isolation, but also face physical difficulties with eating, breathing, hearing, and speaking. As a result, most of these children don't attend school or ever hold a job.

Can clefts be treated?

Reconstructive surgery for clefts has evolved over more than half a century, and today’s techniques and procedures have come a long way. The surgery today is simple and the transformation is immediate. Patients see their smile for the first time, parents cry tears of joy, and lives and communities are changed forever.

Your continuous donations will help acheive this cause - Thank you!

Nigerian children are hidden but free op can help
Nigerian children are hidden but free op can help
Our aim is to spread awareness and find patients
Our aim is to spread awareness and find patients
May 25, 2018

Getting to Know our partners and What's next?

The Ven Dr And Mrs Sydney Ugwunna with the Agape
The Ven Dr And Mrs Sydney Ugwunna with the Agape

Early this month the Patron of our proposed Venerable Sydney Children’s Hospital - The Venerable Dr. Sydney and his wife visited the children’s facilities that we intend to give free healthcare once we open the children’s hospital in Umuahia, eastern Nigeria is established.  The owners of these Children’s charity facilities were excited and very delighted of The Ven. Dr. and Mrs. Sydney Ugwunna's visit.   We are very happy that his donation of 6 acres of land and his inherited 16-bedroom house is part of our big plans to build this wonderful hospital soon!

In the meantime, and although the CEO Mrs. Nnenna Okoturo - myself is on maternity.... nothing stops!  We are still full steam ahead.  The next few months we will finalise the printing of the children’s ‘Red Medical Books’ and start strategic planning on doing an awareness campaign for Smile Train our partner NGO to source out clef lip children all over the eastern part of Nigeria and provide support for Smile Train doctors to carry out their wonderful work to do surgeries to fix each child that has this condition.  The Campaign will be schedule late this year.

By next quarter we will be able to provide plans and dates of our Children’s Wellness programme. As stated above we are well under way to completing the plans and activities for the Clef Lip deliverable. We have 4 other deliverables for the Wellness Programme to arrange, this includes the educational awareness of 1. dental (oral) and body hygiene, 2. First aid and CPR/Choking training to children’s workers in the facilities we visited and are partnering with, 3. Malaria prevention and treatments, 4. Immunisation review and administration.

We are so excited as things are moving slowly but surely!!! We cannot thank you enough for your generosity and again you are welcome to get involved we always need more hands-on deck!

Agape Orphange
Agape Orphange
The Ven Dr. Sydney with baby Chinasa
The Ven Dr. Sydney with baby Chinasa
Visited De Paul Special needs children centre
Visited De Paul Special needs children centre
Abandoned children visited
Abandoned children visited
Agape twin orphans with respiratory injuries
Agape twin orphans with respiratory injuries
Catholic nuns that run the De Paul home
Catholic nuns that run the De Paul home

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