The Butterfly Tree

The Butterfly Tree's aim is to improve the lives of vulnerable people living in remote villages in Zambia. To advance the education and improve the facilities in rural schools, giving every child a chance to be educated. To protect the health of patients by developing the rural clinics offering support sevices, medical supplies and equipment. To relieve poverty and improve the living conditions of socially disadvantaged communities teaching them how to become sustainable.
Apr 20, 2016

World Malaria Day

Vectorcide coating being applied inside mud huts
Vectorcide coating being applied inside mud huts

April 25th marks WORLD MALARIA DAY, when countries and organizations can showcase their work and achievements in malaria control. The Butterfly Tree is the first charity in the world to use a new innovative malaria prevention method, which is proving to be highly successful.

  • Globally malaria is the biggest killer of man
  • Every 60 seconds a child dies from malaria
  • An estimated 3.2 billion people are at risk of malaria
  • 75% of deaths from malaria are children under five
  • 2015 214 million cases, and 438,000 deaths reported

After almost two years of working with the National Malaria Control Board in Zambia, the National Research Centre, the Ministry of Health and the Environmental agencies The Butterfly Tree was granted a licence in 2015 to import and distribute the new products.

Vectorcide coating is a safe malaria prevention method. Since November last year we have been applying the coating to the inside of dwellings in rural Zambia, in villages in the Mukuni Chiefdom, where there is a high prevalence of malaria. This method is harmless to humans and animals and replaces the harmful chemicals used during Indoor Residual Spraying, and it lasts for two years as opposed to three to six months.

Mukuni Health Centre has reported NO new cases of malaria this year, from villages where we applied the coating!

In addition to the coating we are using Larvicide granules in stagnant water and ponds. These are breeding grounds for mosquito - the granules prohibit the larva from developing into mosquito and will not harm fish. Both products are much friendlier towards the environment than existing products containing toxic chemicals.

The use of mosquito nets are still vital for protection - we have distributed a number of these during the peak malaria season from January to June, coupled with the new products maximum protection is being provided.

Our aim is to increase further awareness of malaria and raise substantial funding to help prevent the loss of young lives.  

Links:

Feb 23, 2016

Water Crisis

Dry River Bed - Nyawa Chiefdom
Dry River Bed - Nyawa Chiefdom

Over one third of Zambia’s 15.5 million population do no have access to safe clean drinking water and 25% of all schools to not have a safe supply of water. 

For many of us the constant rainy days this winter have become tiresome. The ground is saturated, which restricts us being able to play sport, do the gardening or hang out the washing. Imagine what it would be like if you had no fresh water to drink, no rain to irrigate the crops and no streams to wash your clothes in.

While some areas of the globe are experiencing excessive rain and flooding caused by El Niño many countries in Eastern and Southern Africa are suffering from drought. Zambia is no exception. Though substantial rain has helped parts of the nation, areas between Zimba to Livingstone, in Southern Province, have been hit for the second consecutive year. The Chiefdoms where we work are in this region.

Reports are coming in of dry streams, failed crops and food shortages. Children are drinking from shallow wells. At River View School, which is close to the Zambezi River, water is generally pumped from the river using an electric pump, but when there is no electricity, water has to be drawn from the river. Last week, a fourteen year old boy had a narrow escape. As he was drawing the water a friend noticed a crocodile heading towards him and thankfully alerted the boy in time!

We have successfully installed a number of bore holes and Indian hand pumps in schools, clinics and rural communities. This facility not only provides safe drinking water, but also a source of irrigation for school gardens to create sustainable feeding programs. As maize is rain dependent we have introduced sorghum seeds for schools, the crop requires less water, along with vegetable seeds. This has helped tremendously as all the maize crops in the area have failed. Sorghum provides a nutritional alternative to maize.

Our priority over the next few months will be to source funds to provide more remote schools and clinics with bore holes, and to donate extra seeds to to help alleviate hunger.

Links:

Feb 12, 2016

Thousands of Orphans Have a Better Life

Orphans at N
Orphans at N'gandu School, Mukuni Chiefdom

It is almost ten years since The Butterfly Tree started its orphan support program in Zambia, to date around 1,000 individual orphans have received a sound basic education. Many pupils have since completed high school, others are attending college, while a number have sought employment.

Within a short time of working on this project we realised that it is not only education that the orphans in these remote villages need. Besides going to school they must have safe water to drink, access to better healthcare, improved housing conditions, and sanitation facilities. Consequently we created a holistic approach to the welfare of these vulnerable children by adding bore holes and latrines in schools, building clinics and providing support for malaria and HIV prevention.

Every family has been affected by the HIV pandemic, which has resulted in leaving 1.2 million orphans without one or both parents. Our workshops helped to build confidence and create peer educators who can then go on to teach HIV prevention in schools. This is proving to be the most successful method.

Our holistic approach has enabled us to reach out to several thousand children in the Mukuni, Musokotwane, Sekute and Nyawa Chiefdoms. We have built entire new schools in areas where children had never attended school. Virtually every project we do is for the benefit of the orphans.

In September 2012 when HRH The Princess Royal visited our projects at Mukuni Village, at the end of her tour she said ‘working with orphans is not easy, but you seem to have got it right.'

Now as we approach our second decade our aim is to expand into other Chiefdoms and communities that receive little help. We are delighted to tell you that we have been able to sustain our ability to run the charity both in the UK and Zambia entirely by volunteers, with the addition of Frank Maiolo who helps with this orphan support program in the USA. Most of them have been with us since 2006, and thanks to their dedication and commitment these orphans have a much better chance in life.

Links:

 
   

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