The Butterfly Tree

The Butterfly Tree's aim is to improve the lives of vulnerable people living in remote villages in Zambia. To advance the education and improve the facilities in rural schools, giving every child a chance to be educated. To protect the health of patients by developing the rural clinics offering support sevices, medical supplies and equipment. To relieve poverty and improve the living conditions of socially disadvantaged communities teaching them how to become sustainable.
Jul 5, 2016

New Malaria Intervention Saves Lives

Stagnant Water - mosquito breeding ground
Stagnant Water - mosquito breeding ground

This year in Zambia there has been a serious outbreak in malaria, which is some areas has turned into an emergency. The environmental officers believe it is due to the unseasonable heavy rain which fell in March, leaving a considerable amount of stagnant water in rural areas. I am pleased to say that the areas in Mukuni, where we applied the new intervention, have not been affected.

The products we have introduced are a safe insecticidal coating and a granule. The inside of houses are coated with the safe insecticidal paint, then once a mosquito lands on the surface it will fly off and die. The other product is a granule, which is placed in stagnant water to prevent the larva developing ito mosquito. Both products are harmless to humans and animals.

This is an extract from a letter sent to us from the Ministry of Health:

‘The application of the products in eight communities in the Mukuni Chiefdom has contributed to the reduction of malaria in Mukuni area. This is because the chemicals are very effective in fighting the malaria vector.’

Sadly in other areas of the Kazungula District it was not the same story. Singwamba Health Centre recorded 3,245 cases of malaria. Included in these cases are the tragic deaths of twelve children aged between one and thirteen years. We have since applied the safe granules in mosquito breeding grounds, in the worst affected areas, to help the government with this emergency.

In addition we have provided the granules in the Ndola area, which is in the heart of the Copperbelt and has recorded the highest number of malaria cases so far this year. Not only does it risk the loss of life, but also loss of production in businesses when their employees contract malaria.

These products are not intended to replace mosquito nets, which are still the number one protection. They can work together to provide maximum protection, particularly for children under five and pregnant women. We have distributted a substantial amount of nets in rural villages in the District.

Your donatins help us to continue our vital work in malaria and help to save lives.

Links:

Jul 5, 2016

Schools received funds for further development

Bathromia supported by the charity
Bathromia supported by the charity

ORPHAN SUPPORT

On the education front we received substantial funding to add two 1×3 classroom blocks and a solar system to N’gandu School. This is being done through a Community Works Project and once again we will host volunteers from Jersey to help with the construction. Arnewood School has raised funds for a boarding shelter at Mukuni, a group of their students will shortly travel to Zambia to volunteer.

Sinsimuku Community School is currently being developed with the construction of two classrooms, latrines and a teacher’s house. In addition a recent donation from a US volunteer will enable our young peer educators, formerly orphans sponsored by The Butterfly Tree to carry out more workshops in HIV prevention. Three of them, Peter, Natasha and Edwin, are currently being sponsored for a computer course. More orphans are to be sponsored over the next few months.

At the end of June we were contacted by our team in Zambia and told that they had found six children from Lumba Village that were not attending school. Four of them from one family and two from another family, all aged between 8 and 16 years, the younger ones had never attended school, while the older ones had to drop out due to lack of funds. On visiting their village the families were found to be extremely poor, they had very little clothing and no blankets for the cool winter months between June and August. The only food they ate was after visiting the local cafes late at night to beg for the 'leftovers'.

We are pleased to report that with our support all six children were enrolled in school within a week of finding them. Funds have been sent for uniforms, shoes, blankets and school fees.

We have a brand ‘new look’ website, kindly donated by Miranda de Freston, one of our trustees and owner of Morphity.

These generous offers of support and funds help to sustain our on going projects as well as allowing us to reach out to more orphans and remote communities in in the Southern Province of Zambia.

Links:

May 23, 2016

Essential School Feeding Programmes

Maize growing in Kamwi Village
Maize growing in Kamwi Village

While people in many countries are tackling obseity, other countries are suffering from hunger. The Seeds for Life project provides schools with an opportunity to create sustainable feeding programs. The project is helping children in a number of rural areas of Zambia to have a nutritional meal, while attending school.

Due to the recent drought The Butterfly Tree is sourcing alternative crops to that of maize, which is rain dependent. Sorghum is being introduced as an alternative. It provides a rich source of energy, is drought tolerant and environmentally friendly. In addition beans are grown to provide a rich source of protein.

Whereas we in the west throw away some vegetable leaves and stalks, in rural areas of Zambia, every part of the vegetable is eaten. For example pumpkin leaves, which we never see when buying a pumpkin, are high in clacium and also  a good source of vitamins, as well as iron.

Local people have depended on these types of food supplies for decades, but sadly poverty and the added burden of drought, leaves families unable to suffice the appetites of growing children. This is where your donation has really helped. By donating just a small amount to our Seeds for Life project, school pupils can benefit from a meal, which helps to improve their concentration and performance.

Due to the lack of rain some school had failed crops, but the ones that left the planting until later in the season have produced healthy crops. The school bore holes provides a regular source of irrigation, unless there is a nearby stream.

As always working in Zambia is challenging, but seeing children eating heartily is both a humbling and rewarding experience. We have bought extra bags of maize for families, such as Wingrey Mulonzya's family, who had no food when I last visited Zambia. They were living off local fruits. Wingrey has lost both his parents. His older brother, who is married and has two young children, has to provide for everyone. To further help this family we are now sponsoring Wingrey's education. 

We aim to provide additional schools with seeds in time for the the next planting. 

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $16
    give
  • $20
    give
  • $30
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $650
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $16
    each month
    give
  • $20
    each month
    give
  • $30
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $650
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.