Apr 26, 2021

COVID-19 PROVIDING PPE IN SCHOOLS AND CLINICS

Mambova Rural Health Centre
Mambova Rural Health Centre

Thanks to the tremendous support from our donors The Butterfly Tree has been able to provide PPE to 40 rural schools and 30 clinics. The opening of the first term for the new school year, was pushed back from January to early February due to the increase in coronavirus cases caused by the new variant from South Africa. However there were no more interruptions, and the first term has just come to an end.

Schools are given a donation of masks, soap, disinfectant, and hand sanitizing gel, without this provision they would not be allowed to open. Though the cases have reduced, Zambia is heading towards winter when there could be a rise in cases. Therefore it is imperative that we continue with the distribution next term.

Because most people cannot afford to buy protective masks, we have two youths in Mukuni Village who have been trained as tailors, making masks. We are shortly going to start a second production line with four female tailors in Musokotwane village. Besides helping their community they can earn an income, and using reusable masks is much cheaper than disposable ones and better for the environment.

Food shortages remain an issue for those communities that rely heavily on tourism. Therefore we continue to provide bags of maize for those most in need, primarily orphans and vulnerable children. Fortunately, the rainy season, which has just come to an end, has been exceptionally good this year and for those who could afford to buy seeds, bumper crops are expected.

Until tourism opens up, we must continue to help those that have had no income since March 2020. In addition to people working in hotels and lodges communities such as Mukuni and Simonga normally receive tourists every week. The tour operators pay a small percentage for every tourist that visits the villages, and all of them have curio markets selling gifts and souvenirs. We are working with a tourism consultant to see how we can attract more tourists once it is again safe for people to travel to Zambia to see the spectacular Victoria Falls and to go on safaris.

COVID-19 support is still very much needed and all donations, however small, are very much appreciated.

Singwamba School
Singwamba School
Apr 23, 2021

SEEDS OF LIFE FLOURISHING

The Victoria Falls
The Victoria Falls

The rainy season in Zambia has now come to an end, but unlike 2019-20 this year there has been an abundance of rain - crops are growing, and vegetables are in abundance. After the drought of 2019, many more people are turning to subsistence farming and school food productions units are in booming!

The six solar powered reticulation units that we installed at River View, Musokotwane, Katapazi, Singwamba, Matengu and Chaba schools have made a significant difference. Water is readily available for drinking and stored in tanks to irrigate the school gardens. Sufficient food is being grown to provide sustainable feeding programmes with surplus being sold to the community. Profits are used to pay schools fees for orphans as well as providing essential supplies for the schools.  

Seeds were donated to a further 14 schools in addition to the above. People in Mukuni Village, who have been impacted by the lack of tourism as a result of COVID-19, have also been assisted with donations of bags of maize and seeds for their gardens.

Orphans and vulnerable children from Mukuni, Kamwi, N’gandu and Kazungula who are on our orphan support programme receive regular donations of ground maize, and boarders at Mukuni and River View Schools are provided with food during term time.

Now the rivers and streams are in full flow, and the mighty Zambezi River has peaked early. In 2019 the media reported that the Victoria Falls, a World Heritage site, and one of the biggest tourist attractions in Africa, is drying up. The media have been proved wrong as tons of water can be seen cascading over the edge of the Falls. Once tourism opens up it up it is hoped that the area around Livingstone will again attract global tourists to see some of the many attractions. The Butterfly Tree promotes travel philanthropy and gives people the opportunity to see first-hand how a donation can make such a huge difference to a local community.

As always, we are most grateful for your support - our aim is to reach out to more schools and communities and take our Seeds for Life project into new areas.

Maize, the staple diet of Zambians
Maize, the staple diet of Zambians
Pearl millet - less dependent on rain
Pearl millet - less dependent on rain

Links:

Apr 19, 2021

Reaching The Zero Malaria Target

Mosquito Nets - Bunsanga Community School
Mosquito Nets - Bunsanga Community School

World Malaria Day takes place every year on April 25th. The theme for 2021 is 'Reaching the Zero Malaria Target'. 

According to the World Health Organisation: 'Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of these countries reported zero indigenous malaria cases in 2020, while others made impressive progress in their journey to becoming malaria-free.'

The Butterfly Tree’s aim is to support the WHO’s goals for 2030:

-        Reducing malaria case incidence by at least 90%

-        Reducing malaria mortality rates by at least 90%

-        Eliminating malaria in at least 35 countries

-        Preventing a resurgence of malaria in all countries that are malaria-free

The Butterfly Tree, working with the Ministry of Health in Zambia, selects areas where malaria is most prevalent and aims to provide universal coverage in each community. Insecticidal coating, larviciding and mosquito nets provide maximum coverage.

In addition, a Medical Aid Film Company and The Butterfly Tree have teamed together to tackle malaria in Zambia. Combining educational knowledge and practical experience from many years of working at grass root level in Africa, we believe that we can help in the fight against malaria by eradicating it at the source. The Butterfly Tree has handed over the animated Medical Aid film on ‘How to prevent malaria’ to the Kazungula District Health Office. The video is now one of their main resource tools and is being used for training and education purposes in rural health centres and health posts, throughout the District.

This month we are distributing 850 mosquito nets as part of our 'mosquito nets for schools' programme, whereby each pupil and teacher takes possession of their own net, after which monitoring and evaluation will be done. We have also donated safe insecticidal coating and larvicide to Moomba Chiefdom which has seen an increase of malaria cases this year. The most likely reason for the increase is the health authorites delay in distributing internventions as COVID-19 took precendence over other health matters. 

Once the inside of dwellings in Moomba have been painted and larvicide placed in areas of stagnant water a significant reduction of malaria cases is expected. As further funding becomes available we can protect more children against malaria in areas where the disease is most prevalent.

A mosquito nets costs just £6 or $9 and could save a child's life.

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