Jun 12, 2018

Creative Collaborations

Eye Camp at Rajbash
Eye Camp at Rajbash

 

It is always inspiring to speak with the founder of the DCWC, Akka Lama. During his recent visit to the Himalayan Fair in Berkeley, CA, he explained at some length about how through collaboration with a wide network of connections we are able to greatly expand the impact of our small hospital in Rajbash. 

People who live at high altitude are at much elevated risk of losing their eyesight because of cataracts. During our recent Health Camps in Rajbash we identified 32 patients who were in need of cataract surgery. Our hospital is not equipped for, nor does it have the specialized staff to execute this surgery. To bring in a team of doctors would have proved complicated. So we investigated how we could safely bring our group of patients to a Hospital in Kathmandu where specialized service is available. Someone had contacts at a Tibetan temple in town. When we explained our mission and the dilemma we were in, the temple not only offered to house and feed our group of patients, but they also offered to sponsor our cataract project. Now we could advise our patients that help was on the way.

Our 32 patients walked in from their various mountain villages and assembled in the Rajbash Hospital courtyard. From there we transported them by bus to the welcoming nuns of the Tibetan temple in Kathmandu. They were given food and a place to bed down for the night as they waited with trepidation what the next day would bring. 6 patients, we discovered the next morning, overcome by fear of ‘having their eyes tampered with’ had left the temple during the night. The remainder assembled anew at the bus and made their way to the operating rooms of the Kathmandu hospital that was going to execute villages, were collected at the hospital and bused to Kathmandu to the hospital that was to execute the cataract operations. For recovery they spent another night at the temple. The next morning was magic: As patients carefully removed their bandages and were able to behold the beautiful blue sky there were tears of joy! Many had given up hope they could ever see again. They were filled with gratitude for the  precious gift of restored sight. The bus return to Rajbash was lively and filled with excited accounts of their outing to the big city.

Another collaboration, this one with a French Buddhist nun who had come to Rajbash and seen the important work that's being done there, connected us to a group of French medical and engineering students whose graduation requirements included an overseas service project. Having heard of the needs in Nepal and particularly in the small village of Rajbash, a number of them decided to volunteer their time in this community, helping at the hospital, in a nearby school and repairing the water system.  Once back home, the students decided to raise funds to sponsor five lucky  young women from Rajbash to attend college courses in Kathmandu, some in nursing, others in business. A single contact, and countless lives are touched! 

We hope that you are as awed by this kind of ingenuity as we are. If you would like to offer a collaboration to benefit our charity we would love to talk to you.  And all of this is made possible thru your generous ongoing donations. 

 

Eye exam at Rajbash
Eye exam at Rajbash
Patients at Gompah before surgery
Patients at Gompah before surgery
Patients at Gompah after surgery
Patients at Gompah after surgery
smile after surgery
smile after surgery
volunteers helping with washed out road
volunteers helping with washed out road
Mar 21, 2018

Rajbash Hospital provides more than medical care

Temporary shelter
Temporary shelter

The original mission of our hospital in Rajbash was to bring basic medical and health services to a remote, underserved area of Nepal. Over time, that mission has evolved, especially since the devastating earthquake in 2015.

Inspite of increased government involvement and services there we are still facing major challenges resulting from the earthquakes. Less than optimal temporary housing and the lack of animals necessary for subsistence farming keep the population in limbo. The physical and psychological pressures resulting from uncertainty about their future are taking a toll. Visits to the Rajbash hospital have shown a sharp uptick and our outreach efforts to more remote areas have intensified. Rajbash has become a center from which services to the entire region are organized.

- Volunteers from France, as part of a University graduation requirement of Service for Medical students, are currently assisting at the hospital.

- A group of French engineering students is assisting in rebuilding the destroyed traditional stone houses.

- Two volunteers from the Czech Republic have just returned to Rajbash from a distant village where they taught English for two months.

- Another engineering student from France helped to re-engineer the water system damaged by the earthquake.

- To prevent a catastrophe like the one in 2015 from happening again, the Nepali government has set down strict structural and engineering guidelines that need to be met in rebuilding traditional stone dwellings. Rajbash supporters from the Czech republic hired Nepali engineers through the central govrnment to help teach classes in these new building techniques to the men in remote villages. After successful completion (and obtaining a certificate) the new trainees are now overseeing rebuilding efforts in the village. They are also legally entitled tohead teams of rebuilders in neighboring villages.

- Our friends in England just now are heading out to Rajbash. They have taken on the challenge of rebuilding 5 of the Rajbash village homes. One dwelling has been completed and another is on its way. The English group will physically help in rebuilding the latter structure. Each of the five families whose houses are being reconstructed will be helping in rebuilding each other's homes - a true community effort.

These are just a few examples of the positive ripple effect our hospital brings to its region. The challenges are many, and the responses to them are many as well. Your support allows and promotes all of the above.

Help us to keep the hospital such a vital part of Rajbash.

Czech volunteer doc
Czech volunteer doc
helping at hospital
helping at hospital
Volunteer teaching
Volunteer teaching
Volunteer building
Volunteer building
health lesson
health lesson
Dec 28, 2017

Why We are in Nepal -Patient Case Studies.

Woman with CPO and typhoid
Woman with CPO and typhoid

The following are some examples of how our patients feel about the care and medical interventions by the staff of the DCWC Rajbash hospital:

     "Thank you Rajabas hospital for making my baby and wife alive, we never could explain how much we are thankful for your life saving support, thank you for your support and help, may god will always makes you happy and always blessed by god”  

         An elderly woman came in with COPD and suffered from typhoid fever . She was admitted 3 days in our hospital then recovered. She was so happy that she give blessing to the staffs of hospital  and  said without the hospital over there many people would suffered  and  may die so she is very happy to be taken care of by our medical team.

       A father who brought his 10 year old son for treatment: “I was so worried. My son was semiconscious due to diarrhea. I carried him on my shoulder and walked by foot about four hours to the hospital. Now my son is getting well. I am very thankful to DCWC hospital for making my son well. May god bless this hospital family and I still hope to get regular service from this hospital.”

        THIS IS THE  IMPORTANT WORK YOUR DONATIONS ARE MAKING  

        POSSIBLE. A GENEROUS DONOR CURRENTLY OFFERS TO MATCH

        YOUR DONATIONS UP TO $12500.  DOUBLE YOUR IMPACT TODAY!

     A 97 yr. old male who sustained cuts and bruises from a fall. Alone with his wife, they have no income and live from the food they grow in their garden.:  “After I had fallen from stairs and got cut injury over whole lower limbs, and there is no ambulance to my house, and I did not have even a penny to pay for transport, I sent my grandson to ask the hospital staff to come to my home. I am thankful that they have come here and treated me, and even now they come to regularly change my dressings. I even can’t explain how much I am thankful to the hospital, god bless them, to help poor people and old age people.”

      One little girl, 4 year old Lukky, came to our make shift hospital tent (after the earthquake) with extensive burns on her hands and her lower body. She and her sister were helping to fill Kerosene into lanterns when suddenly there were flames and anguished screams. Lukky’s parents rushed to their daughters to find their youngest one crying in pain. Bandaging the little girl and comforting her the family rushed to make a seat for her in the big basked used for harvesting. Rocked gently in this make shift ambulance her parents carried her for three and a half hours down to the Rajbash hospital where Dr. Uddav and our nursing staff  were able to disinfect and properly treat Lukky’s burns. Relieved and grateful to know their daughter safe they were on the long journey home the same afternoon.

And here is a quick recap of our most recent quarter:

October: Free Dental, ENT and general check-up camp - served 265 patients

December: Free Accupuncture treatments by visiting chinese specialists 

Mid-Aug - mid-Nov: Largest quarterly number of patients ever treated at hospital -1222

                                        

We hope that this recap makes abundantly clear why the DCWC Rajbash hospital is so absolutely important for this remote region of Nepal. Your support makes it possible for our dedicated, professional staff to continue bringing basic medical care to the subsistence farming families of this region. Please join the match - and watch your dollars double!

man carried on stretcher to hospital
man carried on stretcher to hospital
Thyroid goiter
Thyroid goiter
successful hospital birth
successful hospital birth
 
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