Feb 28, 2014

STICKS AND STONES DO BREAK THEIR BONES

Dear supporters of DCWC:

Life has been busy at the Rajbash Hospital since our last progress report. The number of patients treated rose to 656, nearly doubling intakes in the previous three months.  Sixty-two patients were admitted to the hospital and 48 were transported by ambulance to a hospital in Kathmandu for further treatment.

One of the leading issues for people to seek help at the hospital continues to be orthopedic cases.  This little girl, Tashi, (see pic. #1) fell and broke her leg. Her mother decided to seek relief from the local shaman/healer.  A hospital staff member heard about the accident, went to see Tashi's parents and discussed the risk of improper treatment. The next day Tashi’s mother brought her daughter to the hospital. Her fracture was properly set and Tashi is on her way to a full recovery.

A seventynine year old farmer from a neighboring village (see pic.#2) came to us with secondary infections in an old foot injury.  Here is what he reported:  “Someone from my village came to my house and told me that I was called from the hospital for treatment of my wound and it was for free. So I just went to the DCWC hospital as I was told and yes, I got the treatment for free.  I hear that your hospital runs with foreign support so you should treat some of us in the village who don’t have money and God will bless you for it.  Now, I am happy and hope you will do a good job in the future and I pray to God for the prosperity of the hospital.”  Out of 656 patients in the last quarter, 102 required orthopedic care.

While you are reading this report, the sounds of new construction are ringing through the tiny village of Rajbash. Concerned about staff turnover at the hospital, the village development committee took a look at improving living conditions for the doctors and nurses who have been housed in small bamboo huts. A decision was made to build a separate house to accomodate the medical staff. We are hopeful that by the end of summer monsoon, drenched bedding will be a thing of the past and that our doctors and nurses will get the restful sleep they so badly need.  

There are other exciting new developments:  As part of our ongoing efforts to reach out to pregnant women and to reduce maternal and infant mortality, we have applied to the Nepal Ministry of Health to have our Hospital certified as a Birthing Center for the districts of Sindhupalchok, Dolakha and Ramechhap.  With a doctor and a midwife on the premises 24/7, a sufficient number of beds, and a staff member experienced in pre- and post natal care,  we hope to receive this certification shortly.  This will be a great benefit to the patients who come to us for prenatal care and a safe delivery as well as providing funding for the hospital. Under the rules of this program, the hospital receives a payment of NPR 1000 per delivery while a new mother will receive free ambulance transport to and from the hospital as well as NPR 1000 for each of the first two children delivered at the birthing center. This government program is an effort to encourage smaller and healthier families.  While NPR 1000 may not seem a great sum of money, we believe that in this area of poor subsistence farming families, this money will help to give new babies a good start.  DCWC will continue its program of sending home a bag of rice and a blanket with new mothers.  The increased visibility and status of the birthing center will hopefully attract other women to come in for pre-natal check-ups and post-natal visits as well as receive family planning services.

DCWC also has newly hired Min Prasad Gautam who will use video, photography, song and history telling to bring our program of Health and Hygiene education to schools, women’s groups, local clubs.  He will discuss his presentation with local healers and train teachers to include the material into their regular curriculum.  This is a one year appointment to be re-assessed at the end of year. 

Dinesh, our administrator at the Rajbash hospital, has worked diligently to create a system of record keeping that is transparent and allows us to measure the effectiveness  of our day-to-day operations.  Dr. Ramu Sharma Poudel (Coordinator, National Health training center, Teku, Kathmandu),  our much valued Advisor to the Rajbash Hospital, is facilitating an exchange of administrative software between us and another successful community hospital in Western Nepal, Nyaya Health. Our goal is to achieve the highest level of transparency in all our interactions and to record and make available to the public any and all information related to the running of our facility.

Lastly we’d like to inform all of you that we are planning the following events for the month of October 2014:

        - a three week trek into the Annapurna Sanctuary

        - a three week trek into Langtang National Park and Gosainkund Lake

        - a two week sightseeing Tour to Nepal with an option to go to Bhutan

All three of these events are for the benefit of and include a visit to the Rajbash Hospital.  For more information or if you are interested in joining us, contact Patrick Graney.

We continue to be grateful for the support of people like you who have made it possible to bring basic medical care to one of the poorest regions of Nepal.

 

 

 

Links:

Dec 2, 2013

TWO MONTHS IN THE LIFE OF RAJBASH HOSPITAL, NEPAL

After eye surgery
After eye surgery

Dear supporters of DCWC:

 It is with great pleasure that we are writing this first progress report for you. We want to share with you what your valuable donations are making possible. Many of you have only known us for less than three months but much has happened in that time.

 Our Global Giving Challenge in September has exceeded our wildest expectations!  Through your generosity we raised $16,131 from 106 different donors for the Rajbash hospital.  This constitutes nearly one third of the yearly operating expenses of our precious facility. Our Nepali colleagues join us in extending our deepest gratitude for your gift.

 Our staff at the Rajbash hospital has been busy as well.  In the most recent 2 months period 367 patients sought treatment.  We did 271 lab tests; 66 patients were admitted to the hospital, 14 were transported by ambulance to a city hospital for further treatment. The remainder were treated in Rajbash and sent home. Cutting wounds, burns or injuries from falling as well as respiratory and urinary tract infections constituted the majority of cases. Other ailments treated were gastritis, enteric fever, eye problems, common colds and coughs, joint pain and dental issues.

 Sujita, our midwife, delivered 14 healthy babies - each one returning home with a baby blanket and a bag of rice. 

 A free health camp was held in Rajbash on Nov. 7 & 8.  Our hospital staff, assisted by western volunteer doctors, treated 427 patients. Some of them had walked long distances to receive treatment for a wide range of ailments.  An astounding 188 of those patients came for eye problems which are ubiquitous in the himalyan mountains. 

 Our patient load is steadily increasing as we carry the message of services available at the hospital to more and more communities.  Over the course of the last year we doubled the number of patients treated.

 An instructional video on Personal Hygiene was made to be distributed and shown in as many schools as possible.  We also called a meeting with the medicine men in the region to work out a more reliable referral system, particularly for women in the late stages of pregnancy. 

 Finally, at the beginning of November we celebrated the completion of the first floor of the hospital, made possible by a very generous donation of one of our dedicated American supporters. The newly finished floor was immediately put into service to house additional patients and to provide some much needed office and meeting space.  

We could not do what we do without you. Right now Nepal is trying once more to constitute a new, functional and stable government. Yet it seems near impossible to unify the more than 100 different ethnic groups and to develop a new constitution.  With a lack of leadership corruption is rampant and in non-urban areas services are painfully lacking. Your support allows us to step in and bring services to those who most urgently need it.

Transporting critical patient by ambulance to city
Transporting critical patient by ambulance to city
A new baby for Yangji Shrestha
A new baby for Yangji Shrestha
Jit B. Tamang, 55, Injury from stick in forehead
Jit B. Tamang, 55, Injury from stick in forehead
Manita Tamang, 15 yrs - Burns from scalding water
Manita Tamang, 15 yrs - Burns from scalding water
Health camp
Health camp
 
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