Children's Joy Foundation, Inc.

The vision of Children's Joy is to achieve excellence of its operation in greater heights to empower the children in God's way to live a life of responsibility, and accountability to become a strong pillar in nation building. The mission of Children's Joy Foundation is to reach out the greater masses of destitute children in the country that are neglected, abandoned, dependent, and orphaned by feeding them, providing them a decent shelter, providing them with decent clothing, and sending them to school to achieve their dreams, become responsible and accountable in their community and nation building. The goal of Children's Joy is to provide three million children in the Phili...
Jan 4, 2016

BREAKING STEREOTYPES: A farmer's child dreams big

April (center) sets high goals for herself.
April (center) sets high goals for herself.

          Youths have equal rights to education but with the limited resources and the lack of opportunities for some, they settle down with families at a young age. However, April, a high school student, aims higher educationally. She dreams to graduate from college and then land a job that fits her capacity. Having been identified as one of the beneficiaries of the free computer literacy program, she sees this as an opportunity to improve herself, giving her an advantage when looking for a job in the future. “Excited na kaayo ko. Puhon kung makatapos ko ug eskwela, magamit jud ni nako ang akong matun-an sa pagpangaplay ug trabaho. (I am so excited. Soon, when I finish my studies, I can use whatever computer skills that I will learn in applying for a job.),”said April.

           Born to a farmer, she aspires to go beyond what others in their village her age have become- young mothers who live in poverty. Joselyn, April’s mother, shared that “when I was younger, I was not encouraged by my parents to finish school. For them, it was enough for me to learn how to read and write as I would just marry and have a family of my own just like the other girls in the village.”

          However, she has realized the importance of having an education. “Dapat gyud tagaan ug importansiya ang edukasyon labi na lisod ang among panginabuhian. (It is necessary to give importance to education especially now that our life is difficult).” Now, she motivates her daughter to finish her studies to have a better job someday. She is also thankful that her daughter is given the rare opportunity to learn how to use a computer. Without the program, they cannot afford such skills training.

           April is one of the 500 beneficiaries of the free computer literacy program in Barangay Tamayong, Calinan District, Davao City, Philippines. They were identified with the help of five social worker-volunteers from the Social Welfare Advocates Club (SWAC) and eleven youth leaders from the village. They had a brainstorming and planning session with CJFI’s project officer, Mineheart Tantoy. They divided themselves into three groups and conducted community immersion and home visitation where they interviewed the beneficiaries and some of their parents.

          Based on the data gathered, most of the beneficiaries come from families whose parents are farmers and land tenants. They value education but with its expensive cost, they tend to utilize their children in tilling their lands. However, they are grateful for the free computer literacy program and they promised to support their children in this endeavor.

          Like April, hundreds of youths are very excited to develop themselves in terms of computer literacy. You can help make this project possible by sharing your blessings through an online donation via Global Giving. Your support today will empower 500 more youths to have a greater advantage when they look for jobs and increased productivity in the workplace that can open more doors to various opportunities to access greater resources.

          Together we can help them change their lives. Let’s do it.

April fills out the survey form.
April fills out the survey form.
Her mother (center) realizes education
Her mother (center) realizes education's value.
Village youth leaders and social workers
Village youth leaders and social workers
Dec 29, 2015

Help feed malnourished indigent kids

"I only cook root crops for my children."- An-An
"I only cook root crops for my children."- An-An

      

           Indigent mothers like An-An wish for their children to be healthy but with the limited resources in the upland, they have to settle with whatever food is available at home, mostly root crops.


            An-An’s husband, Lito, is a farmer. He earns a meager income of P120 or around $3 a day, around P500 ($11) or sometimes P2,000 ($45) in four months. They have to wait for 120 days before her husband receives his pay from the harvest. Within this period of time, An-An has to find ways to augment the household food stocks for their survival.
“Samtang nagahulat mi sa upat  ka bulan nga nagahulat sa uma, mangita mi ug among tinanom, mao toy among kaunon, lagutmon, ana ba. (While waiting for the harvest after four months, I look for whatever we can eat from what we planted like root crops),”  An-An, who is a mother of five children, shared.


            However, feeding her children with what is readily available in their backyard seems not enough for their health. She suspects that their diet does not provide the necessary nutrients for a healthy body. Her younger daughter is one of those children in the village who were identified by the barangay health workers as malnourished. She said, “Ang akong isa ka anak nag-eskwela sa kinder, CJF. Malnourished siya. Ambot unsay ginakuan ana nga malnourished man na. Kay akong ginapakaon dili siguro na makavitamins kay lagutmon lang man gyud akong gipakaon. Mao tong kulang sa timbang (One of my children goes to school in Kindergarten. I don’t know why she is malnourished. Perhaps, what I feed her does not give her the needed nutrients because I just feed her with root crops. Maybe that’s why she has poor weight gain.)”


            Just like all the indigenous people in the Matigsalug tribe at Sitio Contract in Marilog District, Davao City, Philippines, their diet is composed chiefly of rice, vegetables, and crops like corn, sweet potatoes, and cassava. With the low income, animal products like eggs, milk or meat are way too expensive for the family.


            Meanwhile, day care worker Josephine, shared that the lack of food due to financial problems among households affects the attendance of the children in school. “Ang among mga estudyante, dili kaayo naga-eskwela kay kulang sa kaon kay usahay magklase ko, naay mga ten, mga five, usahay tulo pa gyud so dili na lang ko magklase (Our students sometimes miss school because of the lack of food. Sometimes when I have my class, only ten or five, sometimes three children attend. So I don’t conduct the class anymore),” she revealed. Most of the times, the children are inactive or weak whenever they go to school because they do not have breakfast at home. She thinks that poverty and big family sizes are contributing factors to the existing problem. The income is not sufficient to feed the family considering that most of them have many children.


            The Children's Joy Foundation, Inc. (CJFI) initially conducted a survey of the heights and weights of the children. With the help of the village health workers, CJFI was able to gather the children and their parents in a small chapel. Dr. Jeovani Palijado also rendered free medical check-up to the kids.


            Residents of the said barangay look forward to the supplemental feeding program that will be sponsored by CJFI and Global Giving. “Nalipay ko nga naay feeding diri sa among komunidad. Nalipay gyud ko maayo, (I am happy that there will be a feeding program in our community. I am very happy),” An-An said. She thanked the CJFI and Global Giving this early for taking care of their children.


            CJFI was supposed to visit Sitio Upian on that same day but reports of insurgency actions in the area stopped the staff from doing so. CJFI then decided to go to the area next time when it is safer as they will surely reach out to the children there who need their help.


            You can also give your share in feeding these malnourished children by sending your donations online via Global Giving at https://goto.gg/20992. Your support will help feed 60 indigent children with nutritious food to target the restoration of the nutritional status of at least 70% of the beneficiaries and the improvement of class attendance by 85% to 100%. It will be a great honor to have you in our team as one of our donors. Be counted and make a difference.

Her daughter, Lenny (left), is malnourished.
Her daughter, Lenny (left), is malnourished.
Poor nutrition affects IP kids
Poor nutrition affects IP kids' school attendance.
Free medical check-up with Dr. Jeovani Palijado
Free medical check-up with Dr. Jeovani Palijado
An interview with an indigent mother, An-An.
An interview with an indigent mother, An-An.
CJF staff and trainees Yekyek (3rd), Ren (right)
CJF staff and trainees Yekyek (3rd), Ren (right)

Links:

Dec 28, 2015

Izza: A street child no more

I want to be a news anchor and be seen on TV- Izza
I want to be a news anchor and be seen on TV- Izza

         CRISES in the family sometimes drive children away from home. At five years old, Izza and her younger brother escaped from their abusive dad who had made beating them black and blue an ordinary scenario after their mother left them.

        The streets near a mall seemed to be a welcoming place for them to stay. The presence of other children reassured them of a better life where freedom was at its best. When they got hungry, they begged for food or money. They vended cigarettes and candies on the streets at times. At night, they retired to sleep anywhere on the sidewalks. They struggled to survive along with older children who sniffed aromatic solvent to alleviate their hunger. But unlike them, they chose to work harder to be able to eat. They would even attend school everyday where they were given free food and school supplies just for them to show up and learn each day.

         However, there were times that the street offered not comfort but danger. One night while Izza was asleep, male teenagers rubbed fresh chilies on her face that she woke up with her face so hot. She cried while they laughed at her. Consequently, the government’s social agency prioritized her to be referred to a residential care facility, the Children’s Joy Foundation, Inc. in Cebu.

        On her first day at CJFI, apprehensive Izza tried to escape. She climbed the fence but the social worker was able to stop her and talked some sense into her. She decided to stay.

        Today, Izza adjusted well with other children in the shelter. She said that she is happy where she is now. “I am happy to be here because they take care of us especially when we are sick. They give us medicines and they would cook for us,” she said in the vernacular. 

        She proudly shared that she has her own bed and cabinet in the shelter. She also learned how to do simple household chores. Izza said “Kabalo nako manglaba unya kabalo nako manghinlo ug manilhig (I know how to wash my clothes. I also learned how to clean the house and sweep the floor).”

        When asked about her favorite subject in school, she replied, “Math. Ganahan ko ug Math kay bright man ko sa Math (I like Math because I am good at it).” This can be attributed to her experience in selling goods which trained her to be good at computation at an early age. 

        Izza is currently in Grade 1 with his younger brother, JR. She attends a school managed by religious missionaries who give street children the opportunity to be educated for free. With her life now on its right track, she is motivated to do well in school until she graduates successfully. She dreams to be a news anchor and be seen on TV in the future.

        There are still more children on the streets who believe that life could never be better for them. What they need is a CHANCE to see beyond their existing world. Once they get it, abandoned children like Izza can work hard on the realization of their dreams. We give them the opportunities to do it.

        As year 2015 comes to an end, we would like to thank you for your selfless dedication in helping us continue our advocacy for the abandoned, neglected, and orphaned children in the Philippines. With your generosity and trust, you have helped us grow not only in terms of the number of needy children that we have supported but also in our personal commitment to deliver our programs and services the best way we can.

        Thank you so much. We wish you and all those close to you a joyous holiday season and a new year of happiness.  

Selling cigarettes before helps her excel in Math.
Selling cigarettes before helps her excel in Math.
Izza and her brother, JR, are both in Grade 1.
Izza and her brother, JR, are both in Grade 1.
"They are like real sisters to me."
"They are like real sisters to me."
With her teacher and classmates
With her teacher and classmates

Links:

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