Dec 31, 2020

You Gave Ujasiri a Safe Home

This year required courage from all of us. In October, infant chimpanzee Ujasiri was found by park rangers in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The helpless orphan was named Ujasiri because it means courage in Swahili.

Little Ujasiri was rushed to PASA member sanctuary Lwiro Primate Rehabilitation Center after being confiscated from the military in a conflict zone. He was dehydrated, underweight and infected with parasites.

Your support allowed dedicated sanctuary staff to save his life with urgent medical care. At first, Ujasiri would not play or groom, important natural behaviors for infant chimpanzees. The trauma he had experienced caused him to wake up panicked at night. But because of your help, he is making a full recovery. His appetite is stronger than ever (Ujasiri’s favorite snacks are peanuts, apples, grapes, and tuna!) and he has even been introduced to new chimpanzee friends. This would not have been possible without you!

Like Ujasiri, PASA member sanctuaries across Africa have had to summon courage to face this unexpected year: 2020 has been extremely tough. Your generosity has allowed the sanctuaries to survive this challenging time in history, allowing them to continue their extraordinary commitment to the animals in their care.

You kept Ujasiri safe and gave him a second chance at life. He and other rescued animals are receiving the care they need, even as the pandemic persists. Thank you for courageously standing by Ujasiri to help him and other orphaned apes and monkeys survive this year.

Best wishes,

Gregg Tully

Executive Director

Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

Oct 7, 2020

Fighting Against Increased Cruelty to Primates

Every day that the coronavirus crisis continues, more apes and monkeys are being hunted and tortured at the hands of humans. PASA member sanctuary Colobus Conservation in Kenya told me that they are responding to about 15 animal cruelty cases each month. Your support has been essential to their primate rescue efforts during this difficult time in history. We can't thank you enough. 

What’s the link between the pandemic and cruelty to primates? Here’s the truth:With the sudden loss of revenue from tourism, many people living near our member sanctuaries turn to illegal activities that harm wildlife, like hunting and the pet and bushmeat trades, to make a living. Farmers also resent primates for eating crops, especially when times are tough. They see the monkeys as pests. This can lead to inhumane treatment, like trapping and stoning.

As these cases are on the rise, you are helping our members continue their animal rescue programs. Colobus Conservation and other sanctuaries have been financially devastated by COVID-19, but your generosity has made it possible for them to address their top priority – providing food and medical treatment for the animals in their care – while still saving more animals in need.

These rescues include that of a lone baboon recently found slowly crawling outside a hotel in Kenya. An arrow pierced through his soft fur and ribs, missing his lungs by just an inch. Colobus Conservation rushed to save the baboon. Luckily, they performed lifesaving surgery and nursed him back to health. Today, he’s wild and free again!

Thank you for giving this baboon and other monkeys in need a second chance at life.  By helping our member sanctuaries survive this difficult time in history, you’re making sure that primates can be brought to safety and that our members can resume their community education programs – where they teach that baboons and other primates are intelligent creatures worth treating with respect – as soon as it is safe to do so.

Colobus Conservation and other PASA member sanctuaries depend on you to save every ape and monkey in need. Each day that the pandemic continues, more primates urgently need to be saved from horrific treatment… and no one knows how long this will last. I can’t tell you how grateful I am that you have joined us to protect these innocent animals from violence. 

Sincerely,

Gregg Tully

Executive Director

Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

Aug 12, 2020

Orphaned Bonobos Have a Second Chance at Life

Pongo gets a second chance at life
Pongo gets a second chance at life

No one knows what happened to Pongo’s family, but the area where this tiny bonobo was found in the Democratic Republic of Congo is known for illegal hunting. She was all alone and in desperate need of expert care.

Investigators learned of sweet three-year-old Pongo when they were alerted about a man in illegal possession of a baby bonobo. They arrived prepared to make an arrest. According to the man, he found Pongo in the forest and tried to reunite her with her family, but they were nowhere to be found. We can only guess what horrible fate her loved ones might have suffered.

Your support allowed PASA member sanctuary Lola ya Bonobo to spring into action and bring Pongo to safety. She was swiftly taken to sanctuary veterinarian Dr. Jonas for urgent medical attention. Afterwards, she was introduced to bonobo surrogate mother Mama Yvonne. It takes experienced sanctuary caretakers like Mama Yvonne to give orphans like Pongo the love, trust, and patience that they need to recover. Soon, Pongo will join the other rescued bonobos in one of the sanctuary’s large forested enclosures. Someday, she might return to the wild where she belongs.

With innocent lives on the line, we can’t afford to stop rescuing apes like Pongo – even during a global crisis. We are so thankful for supporters like you who make these rescue operations possible.

Pongo is just one of several orphaned bonobos recently brought to safety. This past May, Omandja came to Lola ya Bonobo in horrific condition, with swollen eyes and sores all over his body. Tiny Monkoto arrived in mid-July, looking like nothing but skin and bones. The global COVID-19 pandemic continues, exhausting animal caretakers and straining the sanctuary’s resources…but like you, they won’t give up on these animals.

Another call about a baby bonobo in distress could come at any moment. Because of you, PASA member sanctuaries will be able to save them.

I can’t tell you how grateful I am for your support, even through the darkest times. I don’t even want to think about where animals like Pongo, Omandja, and Monkoto would be without you.  

 

Sincerely,

Gregg Tully

Executive Director

Pan African Sanctuary Alliance

Pongo playing with Mama Yvonne and Dr. Jonas
Pongo playing with Mama Yvonne and Dr. Jonas
Pongo receives lifesaving care from Dr. Jonas
Pongo receives lifesaving care from Dr. Jonas
Omandja is rescued!
Omandja is rescued!

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