St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Our mission is to find cures and save children with cancer and other catastrophic disease through research and treatment. We have treated children from all 50 states and from around the world. No family ever pays St. Jude for anything.
Dec 28, 2016

Meet Lexi

Little Lexi and her big grin are cute as can be. She’s a star among those who know her, an outgoing girl who loves to dance and do arts and crafts.

In the summer of 2013, when Lexi started getting bruises that wouldn’t go away, her parents thought she was just too busy knocking around to heal. Instead, blood tests showed 3-year-old Lexi was dangerously ill with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a form of blood cancer.

The day after diagnosis, Lexi was referred to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. “When they gave us the option of other places to go, I said there’s no doubt about it, I want to be at St. Jude,” her mom explained. “We know St. Jude is the place that finds the medicines that work.” In fact, treatments invented at St. Jude have helped push the overall childhood cancer survival rate from 20% to more than 80% since it opened more than 50 years ago. 

And families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. Lexi received more than two years of chemotherapy, so that was a big load off her family’s mind. “We’re just so blessed to have St. Jude to take care of her, and to take care of us,” said her mom.

Now 6 years old, Lexi completed cancer treatment in April 2015 and returns to St. Jude regularly for checkups.

Help our families focus on their sick child, not medical bills.

When you donate monthly, your gift means families, like Lexi's, never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live.

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Jul 27, 2016

Meet St. Jude Patient - Drew

St. Jude patient Drew is now finished with treatments. He's cancer-free and celebrated with a No Mo' Chemo party! Watch Drew's special milestone.

After spending half his life getting chemotherapy, 5-year-old St. Jude patient Drew is now finished with treatments. He's cancer-free and celebrated with a No Mo' Chemo party! Watch this special milestone with Drew and his family.

Drew was 2 years old when he was found to have acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer.

Determined to get Drew the best care, his family turned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. St. Jude has increased our survival rates for ALL from 4% before we opened in 1962 to 94% today — the world’s best. Drew arrived in June 2013 and began three years of chemotherapy.

Families never receive a bill from St. Jude for treatment, travel, housing or food — because all a family should worry about is helping their child live. “Knowing that we would never receive a bill from St. Jude, Danny and I can talk about what to do for Drew versus how we’re going to pay for treatment,” Shawna said. “It changes your whole mindset.”

Recently, Drew, his family and St. Jude staff tearfully celebrated the successful completion of his treatment with a “No Mo Chemo” party at St. Jude. “This is what St. Jude does,” Shawna said. “They fix kids who have cancer.” 

 

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Feb 4, 2016

Research Highlights Winter 2016

Jun J. Yang, PhD - St. Jude
Jun J. Yang, PhD - St. Jude

Gene variations offer clues to cancer risk 

Jun J. Yang, PhD

A small change in a single gene suggests why childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has turned up in two generations of one family. Research led by St. Jude investigators identified the change and found other young ALL patients had variations in the same gene.

The ETV6 gene plays an important role in the blood system. St. Jude researchers discovered that one copy of the gene is altered in a family in which the mother and two of three children are survivors of childhood ALL.

All three childhood cancer survivors carry the alteration, which is predicted to cause the gene to malfunction. The daughter who is cancer free has the same alteration. The father does not have cancer and does not carry the alteration.

When researchers checked an additional 4,405 children with ALL they found almost 1 percent had changes in the same gene. Research is underway to understand the magnitude of the risk associated with ETV6 variations and develop recommendations for monitoring affected children and families. The family in this study has received counseling and follow-up care through the St. Jude Hereditary Cancer Predisposition Clinic.

“The results also suggest that inherited susceptibility to pediatric ALL may be more common than currently believed,” said Jun J. Yang, PhD, of St. Jude Pharmaceutical Sciences. A report on this study appeared in the journal Lancet Oncology.

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