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Apr 12, 2017

How our nutrition program impacts families

Fredy and his sister Dulce
Fredy and his sister Dulce

In this report I would like to tell you about our activities of the last three months and include a vignette that shows the importance of a new initiative we are developing. Our in-home program to care for children with a cleft defect has become widely known in the rural areas in which we work. Because we use local  to provide infant nutritional support, link families to surgical teams, provide education on care of infants with cleft defects, the program has become integrated within the rural health system. Ten years ago, almost all of the children in our nutrition program were brought to our rural medical mission events—many in a very malnourished state. Now, over 80 percent are referred to us by midwives and local government health promoters. Over the last three months the number enrolled in the program varied from approximately 150 to over 200, depending on the number of children who recently had surgery.  Because the infants health can be maintained while in the program, they typically qualify for surgery at an earlier age than previously. With shorter resident time in the program, cost per child is reduced and available funds can be used to help more children each year. Already this year over 60 children have had cleft repairs and we expect a total of about 250 for the year.

Over the last three months we have made significant progress in building a team of organizations that are committed to educate young students and the parents who already have a child with a cleft on how to prevent this birth defect. What is already known is that approximately 4/5ths of all cleft anomalies are the result of some environmental trigger when a genetic predisposition is present. In Guatemala this trigger is primarily the mycotoxins that are present in the corn which is the staple food in rural communities. We are currently working to create the education program on how to prevent clefts and also how to fund this new effort. 

Fredy’s family is an example of what typically happened before we had a nutrition program for children with clefts. Fredy was born with a cleft lip and palate 12 years ago. When he was one year old his parents took him to a surgical team that repaired his lip but because no organization was monitoring his progress he did not have his palate repaired. Fredy has had little opportunity for school because his open palate made it difficult to understand his speech. Now with the palate surgery he just received and the speech therapy he is now receiving from our health promoters, he will have an improved chance of integrating into his rural society. Fredy has an 8 month old sister, Dulce, who also has a cleft lip and palate but she is in our nutrition program and she will be able to have all the care she needs to develop normally in the future.    

Funding to continue the nutrition program and to add the prevention education aspect is our biggest challenge.  Please consider continuing your support of the GlobalGiving project and would be grateful if you could recommend to us other organizations that may be interested in working with us. 

Fredy
Fredy's family
Another patient, Edvin, his mother and Dr. Nahum
Another patient, Edvin, his mother and Dr. Nahum
Franklin, getting attention beyond medical care
Franklin, getting attention beyond medical care

Links:

Mar 30, 2017

Beyond medical care

Some of our patients and their gift bags
Some of our patients and their gift bags

It has been three months since our last report to you and even though things slowdown in the US and in Guatemala over the holidays, we continued our efforts to provide medical care in rural communities. We provided surgical patients to the Medical Mission for Children from Boston in January and the Cape Breton Nova Scotia team in February. In February we expanded our area of service by traveling to four communities in Northwest Guatemala with doctors and non-medical volunteers. These expansions are possible because additional health local promoters are recruited and trained in the process of preparing for the arrival of these teams and the care for patients that will be receiving surgery. These promoters also have the local responsibility for monitoring the children enrolled in our Cleft Infant Nutrition Program. Now 85 percent of the enrolled children in this in-home program are new born and called to our attention by midwives and government health providers. The result is that the children remain healthy and we have been able to reduce the time a child has to wait for surgical attention. The quicker a child receives all the needed surgical procedures, the quicker we can add children to the program. This cleft program is a wonderful example of how collaboration between an international non-profit, Guatemalan organizations and community volunteers can address and solve a very daunting health care problem. 

We would like to share with you examples of the care that is provided. 

Gift bags and quilts

In order to create a more friendly atmosphere, for the past 8 years Partner for Surgery has been taking gift bags to Guatemalan children, and more recently, dozens of beautiful quilts, both made lovingly by a McLean, Virginia church.

Inside the bags, children find items that are not available to them in Guatemala – coloring books, crayons, and stuffed animals. In fact, sometimes even the parents are not familiar with coloring books and we see them with crayons in hand as well!

The quilts are especially important to keep the children warm. Many come from hotter areas and are not prepared for their stay at the cooler, higher altitudes. And when they return to their villages, the quilts add a wonderful touch to their very sparsely furnished homes.

No age limits

We do our best at treating patients of all ages in Guatemala, from just a few months old, to a full and long life.

Felisa is on the other end of the spectrum, coming to us last year when she was 75 years old, with a hernia.

It wasn’t very easy to always understand this sweet woman, but we could still see the love and happiness after her surgery.

That’s the beauty in what we do. Medical care knows no borders, age, and language barriers when it comes to changing lives.

Non-medical volunteer opportunities

We are making a renewed effort to encourage non-medical volunteers to join us on a medical mission in Guatemala and also visit some of the patients in their rural homes. If you know of anyone who might have an interest in learning more, please contact us at info@partnerforsurgery.org.

Birth defect prevention program

Efforts are also continuing to build a program that is focused on birth defect prevention with emphasis on clefts. Universidad Rafael Landivar in Guatemala City has recently joined the effort which is being led by our sister organization, Asociacion Companero para Cirugia. We look forward to providing details on this effort in our next report to you.  

Felisa, a sweet 75-year-old
Felisa, a sweet 75-year-old

Links:

Feb 28, 2017

A soccer player is on the loose

Jonny and Fredy
Jonny and Fredy

Last year, thanks to the support of our volunteers, partner organizations and our donors, we were able to help Jonny play soccer with his brother again.

Jonny was only 5 years old when we operated on him in 2016. Up to that moment, he couldn’t run and play with his twin brother, Fredy, due to a hernia. His surgery was scheduled for October and we are happy to say it was a success.

Today, Jonny is attending preschool and he is able to run and play soccer without feeling any pain.

Jonny’s father, Andrés, and his mother, Zoila, already had 3 daughters when a new pregnancy came along bringing them the twin boys. Before the surgery, Jonny had been having trouble since he was 6 months old and his sisters helped take care of him.

Andrés told us that he learned about Partner for Surgery through the radio and some leaflets brought to him. It was only when he finally consulted with us that he was told that Jonny had a hernia. He was happy to learn that not only Jonny would receive his much needed medical care, but that he also wouldn’t have to pay for it.

Today we share with you some pictures of Jonny after his surgery, and we thank you once again for your incredible support.

Jonny and his father
Jonny and his father
Loved ones
Loved ones
The soccer ball
The soccer ball

Links:

 
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