Global Vision International Charitable Trust

Working with local grassroots charities and NGOs in 20 countries across the globe, the Global Vision International (GVI) Charitable Trust manages and fund-raises for numerous long-term programs. These further the works of of our local partners and aim to alleviate poverty, illiteracy, environmental degradation and climate change through: education; nutrition; conservation and capacity building. Our work focuses upon 3 key objectives, Awareness of global issues, Direct impact upon those issues on a local and global basis, and Empowerment of our alumni, be them our community members, staff, volunteers, fundraisers or donors, to continue impacting on key global issues independently
Jan 30, 2012

Amazing support for the GVI Charitable Trust

We would like to share the most recent trustee report from the GVI Charitable Trust. This report covers the six month period from July to December 2011.

We are delighted to share that this has been by far our most successful period, raising in six months nearly as much as we did the whole of the previous year. This increase in funding has brought a corresponding increase in the impact we have been able to create on our programs around the world.

During this period we have invested in sustainable education across Latin America including support for the elderly in Guatemala and income generation schemes to support education in Honduras and Ecuador. In Mexico we have worked with a community to establish a recycling centre and in Kenya our partners in Mombasa will now realise their goal of seeing impoverished students through to completion of the primary education earning recognised qualifications for the first time.  

These are just a few highlights of an amazing, productive and rewarding six months. Thank you to everyone who has supported us and played a crucial role in these achievements.


Attachments:
Jan 24, 2012

Security wall at the Shimoni Primary

In addition to supporting ex poachers with alternative livelihoods we work alongside the community to help with local development and support educational projects.

At the Shimoni primary school security has been a real cause of concern and an inhibiting factor in developing the school. Over recent times we have sadly seen theft of rain harvesting gutters, the roof from the reading banda and even doors from the classrooms. This was due to a lack of security meaning that anyone could wander into the school area. The school did actually have a fence on two sides and a wall on one although a lack of a complete wall left the school very vulnerable to theft. Now, due to the support of a generous supporter, we have been able to construct a wall covering the front of the plot and supply an entrance gate.

GVI project manager Valerie McCormack explains the impact this has made:

'Thanks to this very generous donation we have begun work on the surrounding wall and there already is an amazing feeling of security within the school.  Madam Hanna the head-teacher is so excited and even plans to start bringing a laptop onto the premises to start computer lessons as she feels it is finally safe to do so.  The whole school is very grateful for the kindness shown.  In the prize giving ceremony this week there are plans to give thanks for the support and dedication shown to the school.  It is amazing how just one wall and a gate will make such a difference to the outlook of this school.'

Jan 24, 2012

Curieuse Island goes turtle crazy!

This project will help us to establish a carbon neutral research base on Curieuse Island in the Seychelles. For this report we thought we would share a story from the field written by one of the wonderful GVI volunteers who participate in research expeditions to support conservation in this pristine environment:

'It was a humid rainy morning as the 3 of 4 (Victoria, Duncan, and I) of us got in the van with GVI staff. All were super friendly and welcoming. After introductions to the other volunteers, we continued on our way to the ferry. To divert  our attention from the choppy crossing en route to Praslin, we sat back to a soundtrack of The Mask, broken occasionally by the sounds of other passengers not fairing so well with the journey!

Conor (our 4th volunteer) wasn’t arriving until late on Saturday so we had a chance to settle in before getting stuck into the presentations.  On Sunday, all our basic instruction began. One of the first things we learned was how to use a machete. Scholar Michelle took us on a path through the side of a slightly murky swamp. After finding several coconuts, we headed back. Duncan and I were the last two, when all of a sudden a 4ft crab slightly emerged from the water. After a brief glare, it submerged itself again. Duncan and I were unable to say anything, and no one else will believe us. But it is there. Stay at Curieuse and you can see for yourself too...

One by one we dehusked a coconut via a metal husking stake...aka a metal pipe with a flattened end. We turned the coconut in our hand and with the other tapped it with the machete until it cracked. Once in two, we were able to eat the crispy tropical snack and drink the coconut milk. Delicious.

We went down the beach to check on the nests. By moving a few inches of dirt in each nest, Science Coordinator April checked to see if any shells were near the surface. Nest one, nothing. Nest two, nothing. Nest three...

April scooped out a handful of sand and gasped. There in the sand was a baby GREEN turtle. It was a rare experience because Green turtles only nest in the dark and the nests are more difficult to spot. One by one the baby green turtles emerged from the sand to make their epic journey to their new world. Only the females will return to this beach to lay their eggs, in another 30-35 years. After letting them make their way down the beach, we gathered the turtle and sand into our hands to help them across the surf. The feeling of assisting something so precious, with the hope that maybe that one will survive, is amazing. The exhilaration of watching this process, the hatch-ling dig out, and make it to the sea, is something I have seen countless times on the Discovery channel. But to watch it in real life, to be a part of that experience, is something so breathtaking that words can hardly justify it. As the turtle entered the water, its fins being pushed to the limit as designed, brought complete satisfaction that projects like this hope to achieve. That was the great part. Sadly, there were a few that did not make it. As with all things, in the battle for survival not everything wins. There were over a hundred egg shells, a representation that many made it to sea, but a few still remained to continue the cycle of life through decomposition.

The next day was our first real turtle walk day. We came across our first giant tortoise. We saw more tortoises and eventually arrived at the Ranger Station where most of them are concentrated. When we eventually got to the beaches, we saw a couple of tracks. Everyone had a different job, measuring, recording, digging etc . We were talking and laughing along our route. At one of these spots, there was a Hawksbill Turtle covering up her nest. We silently watching in awe as she worked so hard to do what instinct has guided her to do. After some time, she finished  covering up and we watched her scooting back into the sea.

We each checked more nests. One of them yielded more hatchlings! Tragically, they seemed to be the bottom of the nest hatchlings and were weak, leading us to believe that they were the last ones to make their way to the sea from the nest.

Everyone is great and gets along well. There is laughing and teamwork both in duties and for fun. It has been a great beginning for our adventure on Curieuse Island.'

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