How to Build Your Project Page

Following is a step by step guide to help you build your project page and use language that communicates effectively with donors, so they can quickly and easily understand the benefits your project and organization brings to the world.

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Project Title

Your title is the first thing donors see and will determine whether they will keep reading about your project or move on to the next one.  Make the project title clear, short, and descriptive. Convey what your project is doing in one phase that answers the following questions:

Tips:

Examples of good titles - All of these titles are clear, concise and demonstrate a benefit

Examples of bad titles

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URL

Create an easy-to-use vanity URL. This will make it easy for you and your donors to access your project page.

Tips:

Good examples:

Bad examples:

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Project Summary

The project summary, along with the project title, is the first thing donors see and often serves as the basis of a decision to donate or not. This will appear on top of your project page as well as in search results. Your summary should answer the following questions:

Tips:

Good project summary examples:

Round Table India plans to build four classrooms to provide free education for girl children who hail from the poorest sections of society in Chennai, also providing the girls with free meals.

This project builds a library in eastern Sri Lanka, providing a rich supply of books and critical literacy support services to 200 orphans traumatized by the civil war and the tsunami.


Bad project summary examples:

The quality of a child's teachers has an enormous impact on that child's chances for success in life.

Critique: This project summary does not answer who, what, where, and how.

Community based sustainable reintegration support to survivors of trafficking and exploited child labor by BNWLA.

Critique: This summary uses acronyms and does not explain how support is being provided.

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Requested Funding Amount

This is the total amount that you hope to raise for this project. Be reasonable with your request and really assess how much funds your project will actually require. Donors often feel encouraged by smaller funding goals because they feel that their donations have a larger impact. You are always able to increase your funding goal or to post additional projects once your funding goal is met.

Tips:

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Donation Options

Donation options are very important to donors.  They describe what a specific donation amount will provide. The KEY here is to show the impact! Help donors understand how their contributions will help. Be sure that donation options tie into your project's stated activities.

 For example: “$20 will train 1 artisan in marketing his/her wood products”.

Tips:

Good examples:

Critique: There is a good spread of donation options, with a good amount of options under $100.  Each option is very specific so the donor knows exactly what the money represents.

Bad examples:

Critique: There is a huge gap between the donation options- you want to appeal to ALL kinds of donors.  Try to keep a variety of options below $100.  Be specific in your donation options--not vague like “provide nutrition.”

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What is the issue, problem, or challenge?

Use this section to give a more detailed explanation of the community needs that the project will address and exactly who will benefit from the project's activities. This section should answer the following questions:

Tips:

Good example:

The recent civil unrest in Burma has sent even more people flooding across the borders in to Thailand. Some of these people are children who have lost their families to war and disease. Instead of warehousing them in a refugee camp, Safe Haven will provide them with a family, a home, an education and an opportunity to become part of a larger solution for their community.

Critique:  It includes the CHALLENGES and the PROBLEM the project is addressing.  IT is very straightforward, informative, and to the point.  It includes the SOLUTION offered by your specific project as well as the less palatable alternative for the beneficiaries.

Bad example:

Imagine a community of 900 people sharing one hand pump.  This is the reality in the rural areas. There is an overhead tank served by a piped water supply from the local government, but it is unreliable – often failing for days or months at a time - and unsafe. The villagers must use irrigation canal water for bathing and washing clothes. With no latrines, open defecation is routinely practiced.  Cholera, dysentery, and typhoid are common during seasonal periods.

Critique:  Be specific about WHERE the problem is being addressed.  Always remember to include the solution you are offering the beneficiaries.

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How will this solve the problem?

In this section, explain the activities the project will undertake in order to reach the expected outcomes or goals.

Tips:

Good examples:

Building of bee boxes, training and education for young unemployed (training in hive construction, site selection, harvesting, honey & wax processing, packaging, marketing, business skills and value-added production).

Critique: This uses very specific and detailed actions.  It is easy for the donor to imagine what exactly is being taught to the beneficiaries

Bad examples:

If we provide this house, more kids will have the opportunity to make a positive impact. With this opportunity, we remove the risk of child soldier recruitment and trafficking for our kids. By providing this home, quite simply we provide hope.

Critique: This is not concrete and not clear.  It is hard for the donor to imagine what this house will provide for children.  Focus on the actions of your project.

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Potential Long-Term Impact

Explain the potential long-term impact of your project as opposed to the more short and medium-term, concrete desired outcomes. Answer the following questions:

Tips:

Good example:

The project will educate 200 women allowing them to rise out of poverty, which will provide for their families’ health and well-being.

Critique: Very specific.  The donor knows exactly HOW MANY people are being served, what PROBLEM is being solved, and what this solution leads to overall (its IMPORTANCE).

Bad example:

To provide The Presidency Girls School, with a stable infrastructure that will support sustainable development in the area.

Critique: Very unclear.  Donors like impact statements that are specific so they know exactly what they are contributing to.  Always include the “WHY IMPORTANT” aspect of your impact.

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Additional Documentation

Additional documentation is optional unless you are requesting $100,000 or greater. Regardless of the amount you are requesting, further documentation is a good opportunity to provide your donors with additional information about your project and organization. Examples of documents uploaded include project proposals, project budgets, business plans, etc.

Tips:

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Primary Photo and Photo Gallery

Your project photos are one of the most important components of your project page. Photos grab the attention of potential donors and help them understand your organization, beneficiaries and the community that you serve.

Primary Photo Tips:

Photo Gallery Tips:

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Web Resources (Optional)

You may list up to four websites that are relevant to your project. This can include your project homepage, additional information about the country the project is in, an online article about the project or organization, a link to an online video or slideshow, etc.

Tips:

 

How to Post a Project