CARE

Our mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from our global diversity, resources and experience, we promote innovative solutions and are advocates for global responsibility. We facilitate lasting change by: Strengthening capacity for self-help Providing economic opportunity Delivering relief in emergencies Influencing policy decisions at all levels Addressing discrimination in all its forms Guided by the aspirations of local communities, we pursue our mission with both excellence and compassion because the people whom we serve deserve nothing less.
Jul 29, 2014

Connecting Girls to Inspire Their Success

It was time to take the girls away from the books and connect them to women who are striving for a better life. There were faces of mixed description – some with looks of curiosity, not knowing what to expect while others were excited for this once in a lifetime opportunity to travel to town. 

Once we arrived,  the reception we received was fascinating, making our girls feel at home. This was a trip organized by Join My Village as a way to encourage high performance among the scholarship girls. The girls were from different secondary schools that work with Join My Village. “This trip is historical not only to me but even my family, I really wish my parents could know that there are women out here who have gone this far,” said Triza from Khola Secondary school.

Echoing what Triza said was Mavuto who will be sitting for her form four examinations in a couple of weeks. “To get educated, one needs not only to be in class, adventures help to expose us to new things and helps to make one more knowledgeable,” she says.

During the day visit the girls met with students and teacher from Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (LUANAR) formerly Bunda College of Agriculture and Kamuzu College of Nursing in the capital city of Malawi, Lilongwe. The curiosity kept the girls going and they walked around the two campuses tirelessly. When it was all said and done, they went back to their respective schools with lots of stories. They giggled all the way feeling different from the rest of the students having witnessed what could be their future.

“My highlight of the day is the meeting with the vice chancellor of the LUANAR, Professor Phiri, which is something I never dreamed I would do. In fact, I didn’t know that this professor comes from Kasungu and as he shared things that he has developed and the plans he has for his home area, I feel proud of him,” said Alinafe who was also among the girls that made the trip.

While there is hope that some girls will make it to the University, many could not make a final choice of which University they may prefer studying. “Despite both Colleges having good structures, to me LUANAR is good because it is away from town giving students enough time to concentrate, but I can’t rule out the possibility of Kamuzu College of Nursing as I have seen young women, almost my age, taking us into different places, having laptops where they can surf the internet and learn about anything that crosses their minds. I also loved their uniforms because they look unique,” disclosed one of the students from Chilanga secondary school. 

When it was time to go back home the girls are no longer singing on the buses, instead they were all sharing what they like most about the trip; some said they love the environment of the classes, the rooms and the library while others appreciated the laboratories and other experimental places like the food science lab. The one thing that they did agree on was how grateful they were for Join My Village giving them the opportunity of a lifetime!

Jul 23, 2014

Education Can Make All the Difference

Freedom or lack thereof decides the direction your life will take. Saifunisa and her elder sister Hadinusha are a proof of this. Both the sisters, along with their five brothers, live with their parents in Batehra village of Shravasti. Still in their teens, the girls’ lives are a study in extreme contrasts. I met them at the monthly meeting of the Ekta adolescent group—one of the groups in which JMV implements its Girls’ Leadership Program.
Saifunisa has been with JMV since it came to her village a year ago. She attends all the meetings and brings in other girls from her neighbourhood as well. Saifunisa, or Saifu as she is called by friends, is studying in class 10 at a nearby college and, in the last few months, has started teaching at a school that her father started.
Her confidence—a trademark of all of the young women who participate in JMV’s adolescent girls groups—was evident. Saifu greeted me with a handshake and introduced herself. 
“We have been having meetings at the village for over a year. I have seen the change in myself and the other girls. They are so much more confident now,” she tells me. 
Saifu wants to complete her graduation and work as a teacher. “Teaching at my father’s school is sort of a practice for me. It keeps me abreast with my course.”
I was stunned to find out that while her younger brothers were all studying, her elder sister never went to school. In fact she was married off at a young age.
Surprised, I wanted to know more about her sister but Saifunisa had to go back to school to teach.
Within five minutes of her leaving, another girl came to the meeting with her friend. She was peeping from behind the door and seemed unsure whether to enter or not.  The shy girl was Saifu’s sister Hadinusha, who had overheard Saifu tell her mother that someone had come to meet the girls. 
Hadinusha had gone through unimaginable trauma. A child bride, she became a teen mother, but due to her young age and improper care, she lost her son a few months after he was born. The young mother was trying to come to terms with her loss, when her in-laws decided she was of no use to them and dumped her back at her parents’ home.
Hadinusha spends her day taking care of her parents and siblings. The only time she leaves home is to buy groceries. The school her father owns runs out of her home but she has never set foot in it. She doesn’t even know the letters of the alphabet.
Doesn’t she feel left out when she sees Saifunisa go to school to study and then teach other kids? 
“Education was not an option for me. How can I regret something I never knew? The only thing I miss is the fact that she can talk to city people like you more confidently and I can’t,” said Hadinusha.
Jul 22, 2014

The Difference Freedom Makes

Freedom or lack thereof decides the direction your life will take. Saifunisa and her elder sister Hadinusha are a proof of this. Both the sisters, along with their five brothers, live with their parents in Batehra village of Shravasti. Still in their teens, the girls’ lives are a study in extreme contrasts. I met them at the monthly meeting of the Ekta adolescent group—one of the groups in which JMV implements its Girls’ Leadership Program.
Saifunisa has been with JMV since it came to her village a year ago. She attends all the meetings and brings in other girls from her neighbourhood as well. Saifunisa, or Saifu as she is called by friends, is studying in class 10 at a nearby college and, in the last few months, has started teaching at a school that her father started.
Her confidence—a trademark of all of the young women who participate in JMV’s adolescent girls groups—was evident. Saifu greeted me with a handshake and introduced herself. 
“We have been having meetings at the village for over a year. I have seen the change in myself and the other girls. They are so much more confident now,” she tells me. 
Saifu wants to complete her graduation and work as a teacher. “Teaching at my father’s school is sort of a practice for me. It keeps me abreast with my course.”
I was stunned to find out that while her younger brothers were all studying, her elder sister never went to school. In fact she was married off at a young age.
Surprised, I wanted to know more about her sister but Saifunisa had to go back to school to teach.
Within five minutes of her leaving, another girl came to the meeting with her friend. She was peeping from behind the door and seemed unsure whether to enter or not.  The shy girl was Saifu’s sister Hadinusha, who had overheard Saifu tell her mother that someone had come to meet the girls. 
Hadinusha had gone through unimaginable trauma. A child bride, she became a teen mother, but due to her young age and improper care, she lost her son a few months after he was born. The young mother was trying to come to terms with her loss, when her in-laws decided she was of no use to them and dumped her back at her parents’ home.
Hadinusha spends her day taking care of her parents and siblings. The only time she leaves home is to buy groceries. The school her father owns runs out of her home but she has never set foot in it. She doesn’t even know the letters of the alphabet.
Doesn’t she feel left out when she sees Saifunisa go to school to study and then teach other kids? 
“Education was not an option for me. How can I regret something I never knew? The only thing I miss is the fact that she can talk to city people like you more confidently and I can’t,” said Hadinusha.
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