Save Endangered Zebras and Help Wild Dogs in Kenya

 
$1,180 $58,820
Raised Remaining

Save Endangered Zebras and Help Wild Dogs in Kenya

Save Endangered Zebras and Help Wild Dogs in Kenya
(view small | med | large | orig)

Less than 2,000 Grevy's Zebra remain in the wild!

Less than 2,000 Grevy's Zebra remain in the wild!
Also known as Equus Grevyi, these Zebra are mostly located in Kenya. Hunted for their skins and the destruction of their habitat, including lack of water, have caused them to be listed as endangered species. They are the largest of the Zebras and are easily distinguishable by their unique manes. (view small | med | large | orig)

There are only 2,000-5,000 African Wild Dogs left

There are only 2,000-5,000 African Wild Dogs left
Wild dogs are often killed by farmers and must compete with larger predators for food. Since they roam very large territiories it is difficult to protect wild dogs from extinction. (view small | med | large | orig)

Elephants under pressure from poachers

Elephants under pressure from poachers
Although elephants are flourishing due to efforts by the government and conservation groups, the elephants are still under attack by poachers. Local poachers use poison-tipped arrows, while more sophisticated poachers use trucks and guns. (view small | med | large | orig)

Mitigating against human-animal conflicts

Mitigating against human-animal conflicts
The biggest problem with wildlife conservation is the potential conflict with humans. As the animals become larger in numbers they are hard to keep in protected areas and oftentimes humans utilize the land set aside for wildlife for grazing. The conflict is often deadly. (view small | med | large | orig)

Animals dying due to lack of water

Animals dying due to lack of water
The giraffe and zebra are the biggest casualty of the lack of water. Due to the extreme drought which has lasted over 3 years, all the animals have to gather at the remaining water holes making it a predators paradise. (view small | med | large | orig)

Monkeys jump fence and eat trees

Monkeys jump fence and eat trees
Gorillas, baboons and even giraffe have been able to successfully hop our fence and eat our trees. The trees are so nutritious that the animals can smell them from miles away. It is like an oasis (or a fast food place for animals) in the middle of the desert. (view small | med | large | orig)

Sopranos actor helps preserve wildlife

Sopranos actor helps preserve wildlife
By protecting wildlife and planting trees, the rural Masai can generate over $200 USD worth of income each month through timber products, wood fuel and eco tourism. Sopranos actor/filmmaker, Turk Pipkin (in photo) visited our site and worked with the animals, trees and Masai women. These trees are only one year old and supply great shade for the animals and people. (view small | med | large | orig)

Grevy's Zebra multiplication program

Grevy's Zebra multiplication program
Through our intensive multiplication program, we aim to increase the population of Grevy's Zebra. Trained Masai go into the field with binnoculars and monitoring equipment to track and record the numbers and locations of the endangered species. (view small | med | large | orig)

Maneaters of Tsavo

Maneaters of Tsavo
Made famous by literally eating the British colonist and chinese railway workers, the lions are making a comeback as the ecosystem improves. These lions are sitting outside our electric proof fence as they wait for their next meal. (view small | med | large | orig)

donate now:

Retired Project

This project is no longer accepting donations.

Still want to help?
Find another project in Kenya or in Animals that needs your help.

Organization

Project Leader

Adam Tuller

Chief Executive Officer
Nairobi, Kenya

Where is this project located?