Global Roots

Global Roots improves the lives of orphans and disadvantaged children with support of local humanitarians from all over the world. We feel the best way to bring about positive change is to offer assistance to the humanitarians who have already taken the first step to help the children in their local community. They are our heroes and it is through them that Global Roots works to protect the world's most valuable asset, its children.
Nov 17, 2014

Fruit Trees and Transparency Mission

A few of the Afghan girls we support
A few of the Afghan girls we support

An update from our manager on the ground (JJ)

The trees our staff planted three years ago are giving fresh fruits now and students are tasting it for the first time. There are a lot of trees at BCG now and most of them have fruit this year. Peach is the most successful of all. Last week the children celebrated their first peach tasting! When I asked them how it taste? the answer was obviously positive “very sweet".

Also there are many apple tree which have apples this year but now they are raw. and will be ready to eat in a month inshallah (god willing). so after this there are not only vegetables at BCG but fruits too. again I congratulate it to Global Roots and its honorable donors specially those who helped us to make this garden and give these fruits and vegetables to children (orphans) now. -- JJ

Oversight challenge. Due to the country’s ever-changing political climate, it is getting more and more difficult for local Global Roots managers to transmit video of the Baharak Children’s Garden along with precise measurement data.

There isn’t single high speed internet link between Baharak and Kabul. We had hoped for a while that the country’s largest telephone and wireless company, Roshan, would help provide a line but negotiations have been slow. We are hoping to eventually transmit videos of our project by way of a one way wire that connects a hospital in nearby Faizabad with a hospital in Pakistan. The Pakistani hospital is connected to the World Wide Web so it would be very easy for the hospital to forward the data to us in the USA.

We are waiting for the various players to sign off on the deal. The videos show children growing and eating food — so we hope no outside authority will interfere with the transmission.

Oversight Mission. We are paying the expenses (about $600) for one of our transparency managers to travel from Kabul up to Baharak to conduct careful project oversight this spring. The Afghan Air Force will give our manager a lift in a “return of remains” helicopter flight.

Project Expansion. We are seeking a major grant from US AID to expand our project. Please stay tuned and don't hesitate to write your congressman on our behalf.

Annual Report. the annual report for this program will available in two weeks and it will automatically be sent to all GlobalGiving donors. Please stay tuned for the metrics for the program you have so graciously donated to..

Thank you!

Global Roota Management

our orphaned children in Baharak
our orphaned children in Baharak

Links:

Jun 6, 2014

Our spring garden is feeding orphaned children!

clearing for replanting
clearing for replanting

We are pleased to report that our 2014 Baharak Children’s Garden (BCG) is already producing vegetables for local consumption by the 60 children it serves — including 20 who have been orphaned by war.

The BCG and Foster Child Network is providing a nurturing environment and food for otherwise destitute children as well as job opportunities for the local women who have few options to provide for themselves and their families. The promise of food from our vegetable garden and chicken egg farm convinces good but very poor local families to take in the orphaned children.

One of the orphaned children served by our garden had this to say:

“On the one hand, we live in a dry location and we do not have enough land and water to grow vegetables. On the other hand, we do not have money to buy vegetables from Bazar which is very far from us. The only way we have to get vegetables is to come to BCG and get it easily and without cost.”

Attached is a spreadsheet describing the true monthly cost of the Baharak Children’s Garden. Global Roots finances the garden for seven months a year and then we try to make a donation for the winter-time survival of the 20 orphaned children we support.

Details about our current garden

The Baharak Children’s Garden is a 1,000 meter garden laid down on dry earth near the town of Baharak We lease the land for $300 a month and we have erected a security wall to protect both the children and our produce.

We chose to lease more expensive land near the town because no child would come if it were too far away and in an unsafe location. The security wall protects our children from potential abduction by Taliban recruiters.

According to our local manager “The protection of orphaned children in Afghanistan is a pressing global humanitarian concern. The Baharak Children's Garden (BCG) helps find homes for orphaned children in Northern Afghanistan and protects them from forced conscription into the ranks of the Taliban and other dangerous affiliations.”

________________________________________________________________

Ongoing challenges in 2014

As stated previously, the Baharak Children’s Garden is located on arid land and there is no irrigation nearby. This means that we must buy expensive fuel for a water pump.

To reduce fuel costs, we have found a solar pump for sale in Kabul. The pump will cost between $900 and $1000. We are looking for one generous donor to finance the purchase of this pump. The donor will receive a photo in the next Global Giving report. Our local manager will hold the pump with the name of the donor on it.

This pump can produce up 1.5 cubic meter water per hour which is enough for BCG. It would then be easy to water the garden daily. The pump has a five-year guarantee for solar and one year for motor. It will cost less than fuel because for generator we need almost $2000 for the whole year, 200 per MONTH plus pipe and generator cost..

Sustainability and Long Term Impact

Our Children's Garden in Baharak turned into a Foster Child Network when our local manager rescued 10 orphaned children with Global Roots funds two years ago on the border of Afghanistan and Tajikstan. 

Each of the 10 orphaned children (including four girls) would have fallen into the hands of the Taliban without Janagha’s quick move to protect them.

With your support, we can expand our Foster Child Network to nine small villages and one major city (Faizabad).

Afghanistan is a land where clan is king. If you’re not accepted inside a clan, you will not be trusted and you will fail at any endeavor you embark upon.

Global Roots is already a trusted member of the Baharak community. Our garden supports 60 children — but we are ready to support 600. 

Thank you for supporting our program!

The Baharak Children’s Garden — a model of transparency

BCG monthly itemized expenses, April - Oct, 2014 (in US Dollars)

BCG rent per month: 300

Security guard: 200

Water pump fuel for watering: 200

BCG Guard & gardener lunch food expense: 300

Food for chickens: 100

Gardener salary: 300

Garden and Foster Child administration: 280

Grand total: 1,680 per month for 7 months

We are hoping to expand the BCG in 2015. Prices will then decrease dramatically because garden expansion will allow for income generation and eventual self sufficiency.

We thank you al for your support!

clearing for replanting
clearing for replanting
clearing for replanting
clearing for replanting
hot climate, shade protection
hot climate, shade protection
the Baharak Children
the Baharak Children's Garden

Attachments:
Jun 6, 2014

Our Children's Garden is raising test scores!

Ritchie
Ritchie's rescued children

Matulani

Our Children’s Garden in Mtito Andei is not only convincing parents to send their children back to school, it is saving lives!

The story of Muuo

Finding himself in a life or death struggle at home, twelve year old Muuo took it on himself to run away to the small town of Emali where he hoped he find some small jobs. He decided to hide himself in a Mombasa-bound container. Unbeknownst to Muuo, the lorry driver decided to rest for a few hours in  Mtito Andei, one of the poorest towns in Kenya.Fortunately for Muoo, it is the site of our Children’s Garden at Matulani Elementary School.Muoo alighted from the lorry in middle of the night and he was noticed by a night watchmen who questioned him. Muuo explained that he was desperate, hungry and he had nowhere to go.The kind night watchman took Muoo immediately to a very poor, local rescue center for children. He couldn’t be taken to school without a local sponsor and there was no food at the center. Once again, Muoo took it on himself to walk to Matulani Elementary School after he heard a rumor from other hungry runaways the school had a successful lunch program. Upon arrival at the school, he told his story and he received a school uniform. Muoo is now eating a daily lunch and Global Roots is paying his school fees!Ritchie Mutua of Global Roots met Muuo the first time at Matulani and he tried to interview him but Muuo wept too much. On a second occasion, with the confidence afforded by a full belly and new clothes, Muuo told us his story.Muuo is from Kati Komu — a village far from Mtito. He was raised by his grandparents after his dying mother abandoned him seven years ago. His grandparents, however, have fallen on hard times and they, too, are unable to care for him. Muuo’s human survival instincts kicked in when he knew deep down he would starve to death if he stayed at home.Now all he wants is to find a way to care for his grand parents!Muuo is a beautiful boy and he is the reason we do what we do. That our garden saved his life is a testament to grassroots aid work!

Please visit our website to watch a video interview with Muuo

2014 spring update

Because Mtito Andei is one of the most corrupt environments on the planet we must move forward from year to year with a great deal of due diligence, oversight and transparency. Celebrating our successes too much could divert our attention from the constant forces of corruption in one of Kenya’s most forsaken areas.

We are pleased, however, to finally have solid evidence that our school lunch program at Matulani Elementary School has raised test scores. Please see attached spread sheet.

The following is an oversight report from our lead transparency officer in Kenya.

“The attached document is my take on the Matulani school grades metrics as per the data provided by the headmaster. 

The analysis is based only on the Primary School section and compares the academic performance of the first school term of this year with that of the last term in 2013.

The headmaster tells me that the total number of students enrolled at any given time tends to fluctuate from school term to term, in particular to the classes below Standard 7 due to the transient nature of the employment of some of the students’ parents. The proximity of the school to the Mombasa highway means that a good number of school parents derive their income from business or occupations related to the road and so they do tend to pack up and leave to follow other opportunities or jobs in towns situated along the road.

The enrollment of students in the nursery section has however increased by 38% from the end of last year. There are now 33 nursery students, up from 24.

An orphaned boy (Muoo) has also been enrolled as the school and is being housed by well wishers. He originally comes from a location approximately 100 kms from the school. When local residents became aware of his status, Matulani was made the school of choice for his placement due to its feeding program.

Cases of truancy have also reduced.The headmaster states that 90% of the students attend school on a regular basis. The 10% no-shows usually include the more sickly, H.I.V infected students.

The headmaster has also issued bylaws and opened up a register through which parents are encouraged to regularly visit the school, tour the gardens and to record their comments and suggestions. He is trying to get the school community to take more ownership of the project.

The student body usually spends their mid-morning break of 30 minutes a day working in the chicken shed changing the drinking water and looking for newly laid eggs.

In the afternoon, students will also assist in the gardens with harvesting vegetables and weeding where necessary. The headmaster intends to use them to help him clear more land for additional planting over the coming weeks.

The chickens are laying an average of 3 eggs a day, but now that the plastering work at the original chicken house has been completed, the chicken will be moved there from their current temporary home and he expects the chicken's productivity to improve. The room they are kept in at the moment is close to the classrooms and he thinks the noise and commotion from the students has been stressing some of the chicken.

I also spoke to the Chairman about the organizing committee. He echoed the headmaster's sentiments that all is going smoothly with the project. He repeated the headmaster's concern about the high water bill and their intention to install a water drip system. The Chairman divulged to me that World Vision has donated a water tank to the school and they intend to use it to store water for the drip system. I had already discussed with the headmaster that he would have to source funding for this initiative from the monthly allowance the school receives and I am glad to hear that they are making progress to achieving this objective.

The headmaster and the chairman are eager to open up an bank account and appoint signatories for more transparent handling of the monthly allowance. I would however suggest that we wait until your visit in July. It will give you the opportunity to meet these other members of the committee personally so that you can make your own assessment of their characters. Your presence will also provide the necessary 'gravitas' over formalization of their management roles.

Report from Richie Mutua. Global Roots Lead Outreach Officer, Mtito Andei.

The two children below joined Matulani primary school after the lunch program was introduced. They explained to me why they chose to come to Matulani without even the company of their guardian. Their mother got married to an old man at Matulani village and he never bothered to take them to school. In the evenings they would mix with other kids from Matulani at local playgrounds. It's by this mingling that Kyania and Maswili learned about the food at Matulani. Amazingly, they came to learn morning without books, guardian and uniform. Please have a keen look at their clothing. This is not school uniform but they school has taken them the way they are. We continue to appreciate Global Roots for helping Kenyan kids return BACK to school.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

We thank all generous donors for your support!

The Global Roots Team, Kenya

 


Attachments:

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