Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

The Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF; formerly the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation, NYOF) is devoted to bringing hope to the most destitute children in the beautiful but impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal. With a personal touch, we provide these children with what should be every child's birthright - education, housing, medical care, and loving support. Empowered to reach their potential, these children blossom, enriching the world we all share.
Jul 28, 2014

Thanks for your support!

Village students
Village students

Thank you for your support of our project to Send Deserving Children to School in Rural Nepal. Your generosity has changed the lives of some of the most destitute children in Nepal by giving them the gift of an education.

These children come from families so poor that the cost of school uniforms, supplies and even a modest school fee is far beyond their meager budgets. They live in remote villages where access to education is difficult. In addition, many parents need their children to work on the family farm or perform household chores and some believe school is beyond their reality, and sadly beyond their dreams.

In several rural districts in Nepal, NYF grants scholarships to children to cover their school expenses. This is the first generation in most of these areas to receive an education. The cost – about $100 a year per child – is an incredible investment. An education will best prepare these youngsters for the very difficult future that awaits them.

NYF supports children until they can support themselves. After they graduate from high school, we provide them with college scholarships or vocational training. There are currently 28 children in the program.

We asked some of the rural scholarship girls to reflect on their lives and ambitions:

Pushpa, a student in class five wrote; “Despite the … adversities, I am not hopeless… I am studying hard because I am determined to become a nurse and take care of the poor.”

Kamala, an 8th grader, said; “After getting this scholarship I have been able to go to school regularly and keep myself neat and clean.”

Menuka wrote; “I am happy that this scholarship has provided an opportunity for us to get education on an equitable basis with other rich and high class people. We can also become a renowned person if we get equal access of education.”

Your support gives young girls like Pushpa hope for a better future.

Namaste!

Village scholarship girls
Village scholarship girls

Links:

Jun 18, 2014

Olga Murray Reflects on Kamlari Freedom Day

Olga Murray marching with freed Kamlari
Olga Murray marching with freed Kamlari

Dear Friends,

The day of the Maghe Sankranti festival this year, January 15, 2014, was a very special one for the daughters of the Tharu community of Western Nepal. Unlike past festivals, they didn’t have to worry that their parents would sell them off as “Kamlari,’ or indentured servants.

“Kamlari Freedom Day” — celebrated with a march, and many speeches by government “thulo manchhes” (big shots) — was also special for me. It was a once-in-a-lifetime-I-never-thought-I’d-see-the-day event!

NYF ignited a movement
Since 2000, NYF has been working to eradicate this pernicious custom by liberating over 12,000 girls from bondage and bringing them home to live with their families, providing their parents with a piglet or a goat to make up for the girls’ wages, placing the liberated girls in school, and carrying out an energetic awareness campaign to turn the Tharu mothers and fathers against the practice. This, along with lawsuits against employers who persisted in enslaving their little girl servants and heavy lobbying with the government, has brought freedom not only to the present generation of child servants, but to their daughters and their daughters’ daughters as well.

As I sat on the stage for what seemed hours, I harkened back to the time of my first visit to Dang thirteen years ago, almost to the day. That time, the context was entirely different. I thought of the little orphan girl I saw that day sobbing relentlessly by her uncle’s side, begging not to be sent back to work for her callous employer — while her uncle told us, without shame, that he had sold her and her sister to pay for the cost of his son’s wedding.

Freedom for future generations
I was similarly clueless about what was being said by the many speakers on Kamlari Freedom Day, but I knew with certainty that that little girl did not spend the rest of her childhood as a kitchen slave, and that this was true of other Tharu girls of her generation and generations to come. The proof was before my eyes, as I looked down at a sea of faces of freed, assertive former Kamlari, including 30 who had just passed their college entrance examinations and were headed for higher education.

When it came my turn to speak, I wish I could have just shouted the Tharu equivalent of “You go girls!”

Thank you everyone, for supporting NYF through the years and helping to make this amazing new freedom possible.

With appreciation,

Olga Murray
Founder & Honorary President

Olga Murray honored at Kamlari Freedom Day
Olga Murray honored at Kamlari Freedom Day
Swastika was also rescued this year by NYF
Swastika was also rescued this year by NYF
Gita is one of 42 Kamlari rescued this year
Gita is one of 42 Kamlari rescued this year

Links:

Jun 18, 2014

Olga Murray Reflects on Kamlari Freedom Day

Olga Murray marching with freed Kamlari
Olga Murray marching with freed Kamlari

 Dear Friends,

The day of the Maghe Sankranti festival this year, January 15, 2014, was a very special one for the daughters of the Tharu community of Western Nepal. Unlike past festivals, they didn’t have to worry that their parents would sell them off as “Kamlari,’ or indentured servants.

“Kamlari Freedom Day” — celebrated with a march, and many speeches by government “thulo manchhes” (big shots) — was also special for me. It was a once-in-a-lifetime-I-never-thought-I’d-see-the-day event!

NYF ignited a movement
Since 2000, NYF has been working to eradicate this pernicious custom by liberating over 12,000 girls from bondage and bringing them home to live with their families, providing their parents with a piglet or a goat to make up for the girls’ wages, placing the liberated girls in school, and carrying out an energetic awareness campaign to turn the Tharu mothers and fathers against the practice. This, along with lawsuits against employers who persisted in enslaving their little girl servants and heavy lobbying with the government, has brought freedom not only to the present generation of child servants, but to their daughters and their daughters’ daughters as well.

As I sat on the stage for what seemed hours, I harkened back to the time of my first visit to Dang thirteen years ago, almost to the day. That time, the context was entirely different. I thought of the little orphan girl I saw that day sobbing relentlessly by her uncle’s side, begging not to be sent back to work for her callous employer — while her uncle told us, without shame, that he had sold her and her sister to pay for the cost of his son’s wedding.

Freedom for future generations
I was similarly clueless about what was being said by the many speakers on Kamlari Freedom Day, but I knew with certainty that that little girl did not spend the rest of her childhood as a kitchen slave, and that this was true of other Tharu girls of her generation and generations to come. The proof was before my eyes, as I looked down at a sea of faces of freed, assertive former Kamlari, including 30 who had just passed their college entrance examinations and were headed for higher education.

When it came my turn to speak, I wish I could have just shouted the Tharu equivalent of “You go girls!”

Thank you everyone, for supporting NYF through the years and helping to make this amazing new freedom possible.

With appreciation,

Olga Murray
Founder & Honorary President

Olga Murray honored at Kamlari Freedom Day
Olga Murray honored at Kamlari Freedom Day
Gita is one of 42 Kamlari rescued this year
Gita is one of 42 Kamlari rescued this year
Swastika was also rescued this year
Swastika was also rescued this year

Links:

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