Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

The Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF; formerly the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation, NYOF) is devoted to bringing hope to the most destitute children in the beautiful but impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal. With a personal touch, we provide these children with what should be every child's birthright - education, housing, medical care, and loving support. Empowered to reach their potential, these children blossom, enriching the world we all share.
Jan 7, 2015

The kids that inspire me

Rajan and Choodamani
Rajan and Choodamani

I often talk about all the extraordinary children we serve. I’ve often described their harrowing lives before they came to us – heartrending stories of neglect and abuse.

What I haven’t talked about often enough is how they’ve turned out and how utterly satisfying it is to witness their transformation from homeless waifs to confident and successful young adults.

Long after they have grown up and forged their own paths in the world, they come visit me in Katmandu to talk about their lives and introduce me to their spouses and children. As I sit in my garden chatting away with these capable, self-reliant young adults, I think back to the time they first came into my life and I am filled with gratitude and awe at what these kids have become.

When Choodamani was a boy he burned his foot and became partially disabled. His social worker wrote to us explaining that his school was far away, across a river – too far for the boy to limp there on his own. The letter quoted 12-year-old Choodamani saying he wanted to be “the Charles Darwin of Nepal.” So we brought this ambitious young boy to start a new life at J House, our home for boys, where school would be easily accessible and he would be well-cared for.

Choodamani eventually became our very first J House graduate, and we’re as proud as any family would be. After high school, he got a job in a hospital as a physical therapist while he took classes at college. He eventually became a leader in Nepal’s emerging disability rights movement, and served on Nepal’s National Federation of the Disabled.

Our Disabled Scholarship fund has helped hundreds of deaf, blind and physically disabled children students get an education and learn the skills necessary to live full, productive lives.

Often treated as discards in Nepal's caste society, we send the children to special schools which are set up to care for them physically and academically. Our students thrive. Last year, we welcomed 49 new students into our program, caring for a total of 110 students in preschool through high school.

Your dollars go far in Nepal. Thank you for your generous contributions to our project to Provide Education to 20 Disabled Children. This program’s accomplishments would not be possible without the support of people like you.

Namaste!

Olga with another NYF success story
Olga with another NYF success story

Links:

Jan 7, 2015

Reaching out to children in need

Women and children at an outreach camp
Women and children at an outreach camp

The staff at the Nutritional Rehabilitation Home (NRH) in Kathmandu screened 2,952 children last year for malnutrition during 10 outreach camps in rural communities throughout Nepal.

NYF staff referred the most severely malnourished children to the nearest NRH for treatment and educated the mothers of 1,420 others who were found to be mildly or moderately malnourished.

NYF staff conducts “Nutritional Outreach Camps” throughout the country every year to identify children who need treatment. Last year, we organized 10 such camps. NYF also conducted nutrition awareness programs in two schools from May 15-21, 2014 as part of the government’s School Health and Nutrition Week program.

In addition to treating malnourished children and teaching their mothers the basics of good nutrition, we offer Dietitian Training workshops for health professionals, focusing on diet counseling, menu preparation, nutritional awareness and improvement in kitchen management and cooking in hospitals. The 1,235 healthcare professionals and volunteers who went through the training sessions last year multiplied the effect by sharing their knowledge with other professionals in their teams.

NYF operates 16 NRH's throughout the country where severely malnourished children are nursed back to health and their mothers are taught the basics of good nutrition using affordable, locally available food.

Thank you for helping us to nourish these children.

Namaste!

Medical students attend a NRH training session
Medical students attend a NRH training session
Nutritional and health education for mothers
Nutritional and health education for mothers

Links:

Jan 6, 2015

Giving New Life to children with HIV/AIDS

Nutrition and Health Education for Mothers
Nutrition and Health Education for Mothers

HIV/AIDS is a rapidly growing problem in Nepal, fueled by ignorance about HIV prevention and brutal discrimination against people with AIDS. Many children with HIV are forced to leave their schools, and infected women are often abandoned by their husbands. Because of this stigma, many people avoid being tested and hide their symptoms of AIDS for as long as possible. According to a U.N. study, more than 80% of Nepalis with HIV have not been diagnosed.

New Life Center offers what its name promises – a new start for the 102 children with HIV/AIDS and their caretakers who were treated at the center in 2013-2014.  The program provides lifesaving treatment to children while teaching their caretakers, most of whom also have HIV, to live hygienically and cook nutritious meals. This training dramatically reduces the risk of acquiring the illnesses that make HIV develop into AIDS, and let’s infected people lead fulfilling lives. During the months that children and their guardians spend there, they receive food, housing, and all medical treatment for free.

Opened in 2006, the center can house 18 children and their caretakers for several months. Last year, the center admitted 91 new children, in addition to 11 children who remained from the previous year. More than half of these children were under the age of 5.

It is the only facility in Nepal that uses a comprehensive, holistic approach to helping HIV-positive children. Its nurses, nutritionist, doctor, and other staff provide:

For the children: education and enriching activities

For their caretakers: training in nutrition, health, literacy, and income generation

For both: nutritious meals, 24-hour medical care, and counseling to improve their self-confidence and help them manage the stigma of HIV/AIDS.

Most children who are admitted to the Center suffer from health problems such as malnutrition and tuberculosis. Rather than only treating their symptoms, the Center implements a three-pronged approach consisting of clinical therapy, nutritional therapy, and psychological therapy. While the nurses treat the patients’ health issues and give anti-retroviral drugs to reduce the effects of HIV infection, the professional nutritionist and cook plan and prepare healthy, well-rounded meals. Professional psychological counselors help the children and their guardians learn to live with the stigma of HIV/AIDS and improve their self-esteem. 

The nurses and nutritionist complement the treatment with a series of educational programs for the caretakers. The topics include nutrition, sanitation and hygiene, the dietary needs of children of different ages, reproductive health, and illnesses that commonly afflict people with HIV. This training enables the parents to avoid many of the diseases that are particularly dangerous to HIV-positive people and to eat a balanced diet using inexpensive, locally available foods to keep themselves and their children as healthy as possible. The children also participate in enrichment activities such as celebrating Nepali festivals and taking trips to the zoo.

After several months, when the patients’ health problems have been alleviated and the caretakers are fully trained, they return to their homes.

Many live productive lives for years by practicing what they learned at the New Life Center. If they need additional treatment or if their health worsens, they can return to the Center for free follow-up care at any time.

The Center’s staff has taken initiative to raise money for the program. In addition to requesting donations from visitors and supporters, they print and sell t-shirts and note cards. They formed a partnership with Heifer International, which contributed two cows, who are a source of fresh milk to nourish the children and sell for additional income.

Thank you for supporting these vulnerable children.

Namaste!

Classroom instruction for children at New Life Ctr
Classroom instruction for children at New Life Ctr

Links:

donate now:

Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $18
    give
  • $65
    give
  • $137
    give
  • $225
    give
  • $260
    give
  • $520
    give
  • $780
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $18
    each month
    give
  • $65
    each month
    give
  • $137
    each month
    give
  • $225
    each month
    give
  • $260
    each month
    give
  • $520
    each month
    give
  • $780
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF) on GreatNonProfits.org.