Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

The Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF; formerly the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation, NYOF) is devoted to bringing hope to the most destitute children in the beautiful but impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal. With a personal touch, we provide these children with what should be every child's birthright - education, housing, medical care, and loving support. Empowered to reach their potential, these children blossom, enriching the world we all share.
Oct 31, 2013

NYF hands over 8 nutrition homes to government

Jal at admission to the NRH
Jal at admission to the NRH

We began building Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes in 1998 as a way to restore severely malnourished children to good health while educating their caregivers about nutrition basics. Yet with half of all Nepali children suffering from malnutrition, we knew we would need the Nepali government to partner with us to create a sustainable solution for the problem. 

Today, the Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes (NRHs) are a model of innovation and sustainability. We have built 16 of these small hospitals throughout the country, and the government is now operating eight of them. Together, we have helped more than 20,000 children and have educated their parents about low-cost nutrition strategies.

It's a win-win program. We build the NRH’s, hire and train the staff, and help the hospitals develop a successful operating plan. After five years, we hand over management of the NRHs to the government, freeing up valuable resources so we can continue to build new facilities — such as the NRHs we're building in Baglung, Dang and Butwal.

When you meet the children we serve, you appreciate the miracles that happen at the NRHs. Jal Bahadur is one of the children who got a new start in life at an NRH. Last April, NYF workers found him during a Nutrition Outreach Camp. His mother had died four months earlier, and his deeply impoverished father struggled to care for Jal and his older sister. Three-year-old Jal was so malnourished he could not talk, walk or even stand up.

Within 20 days of care at the center, Jal had gained weight and regained enough strength in his legs to walk. His father learned the basics of good nutrition and took this information back with him to share in his rural village.

While poverty is pervasive in Nepal, the simple lack of knowledge about good dietary practices is often the cause of child malnutrition. NRH nurses and nutritionists teach parents to prepare food that is affordable and locally available. The families return home with a healthy child and the knowledge they need to keep all of their children growing strong.

Thanks to your support, children like Jal have a chance to lead a healthy life.

Jal at discharge from the NRH
Jal at discharge from the NRH
Children queuing up for screening at the NRH
Children queuing up for screening at the NRH
Weigh -in at an NRH
Weigh -in at an NRH

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Oct 17, 2013

I Can See with the Eyes of Education

Pratiksha thrives in school
Pratiksha thrives in school

Pratiksha is paralyzed from the waist down but her disability does not slow her down from her studies at her local primary school.

The happy and energetic eight-year-old is receiving an education through NYF’s Disabled Scholarship Program. She is one of 61 students currently enrolled in the program that helps blind, deaf and physically disabled students get an education and learn the skills necessary to live full, productive lives.

In addition to supporting her education, NYF also pays Pratiksha’s medical expenses.

Our disabled students did exceptionally well this year on the School Leaving Certificate, a rigorous test all Nepali students must take to graduate from 10th grade and continue their studies. Of the 11 children who took the exam in June, only one failed – a 91 percent pass rate!

We also had two new students enter the scholarship program this year.

NYF has paid special attention to blind, deaf, and physically challenged children, giving 190 of them scholarships since its inception. If they can enter regular school or college, NYF enrolls them there. For other children, the best place is a special school that meets their needs. The program has been highly successful – many of its graduates are now providing for themselves and their families. Some are paying their own way through graduate school.

More than 90% of the world's blind people live in developing countries; of these, more than 600,000 live in Nepal. In addition, a great number of these are children who, without special help, have very little chance to live full and satisfying lives. With your support, many of these children receive the gift of an education and become productive members of their society.

Thank you for your continued generosity.

Namaste.

Aug 19, 2013

Shortening the distance to education

New residents of the Gaurishankar Youth Hostel
New residents of the Gaurishankar Youth Hostel

Life in the rugged western region of Nepal – some 500 miles from Kathmandu – is a constant struggle for survival. People lack adequate food, safe driving water, decent schools and primary health care. Travel is difficult. There are few roads and those that exist are in poor condition.

The most striking problem I observed while visiting the area was the high number of students who drop out of school. They are not quitting because they do not want an education, but because of the long journeys they are forced to take to get to class. Villages tend to be small – typically around 10 households in each. Since it is impossible to build a school in each village, they are constructed more or less at equal distance from the surrounding villages. As a result, some children walk as much as eight hours a day to get to and from school, trekking along dangerous trails, through dense forests and across thundering rivers. The problem is especially acute for girls, who also risk physical assault.

We discussed the problem with local teachers, students and parents in various villages and came up with a plan to build student housing – dormitories where students could stay during the week. We chose a school that served a large population of students and selected the Gaurishankar Secondary School in Doti, which is the only high school in the area that serves 30 villages.

Local villagers donated land for the project, provided volunteer labor and managed the construction work. We built two hostels – one for girls and another for boys. The hostel was limited to students who had to walk three to eight hours a day to and from school. Teachers live with the students during the week.

During a recent visit, we were overwhelmed to see the joy and gratitude of the children – no more would they have to waste hours every day and risk their lives just to attend school. We hope this project will be the first of many that will ease the burden of students in this remote and impoverished part of Nepal.

Villagers welcome NYF to Gaurishankar School
Villagers welcome NYF to Gaurishankar School

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