Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Fellow Mortals is more than a place. It is a living philosophy based on the belief that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity. Fellow Mortals provides excellent medical care to injured and orphaned wild animals entrusted to the hospital by the public. Fellow Mortals continues to advance treatment for the most critically injured and compromised animals admitted for care, demonstrated by a continued high rate of recovery and release back to the wild. Fellow Mortals also attempts to limit the number of animals admitted for care each year by offering public education to prevent unnecessary injury and orphaning, thereby reducing the total n...
Apr 16, 2013

One Wild Bird's Story

Merganser when it was admitted to Fellow Mortals
Merganser when it was admitted to Fellow Mortals

Every individual animal that comes to Fellow Mortals has a 'cycle of healing.'  This is one month in the life of a Red-breasted Merganser.

The merganser was found on March 5 in the road.  He was nearly 25 percent underweight, and had just been hit by a car.  X-rays taken back at the hospital show a skull fracture and fractured leg.  He was in very critical condition.

The next few days, the merganser was tube-fed (a tube is put down the animal's throat and nourishment provided to the stomach when an animal cannot feed itself).  A few days later, the merganser ate a live minnow for the first time!  The skull fracture had not affected his ability to see and procure food.

While the merganser's leg was healing, he could not be in the water, and so we had to give daily small baths to keep his feathers clean, resplinting the leg after each bath.  After 14 days, the fracture had stabilized (callused) and he was able to stand for the first time.  The splint was removed!

Recovery came quickly after the splint came off and the merganser had access to water, and fish and bathing 24 hours a day.

6 weeks later, the merganser is healed and acclimated to the outdoor temperature, and will soon be released.

Every animal has its own 'cycle of care' from critical to release.  This is one story.

Thank you--for making happy endings possible...

X-ray of merganser showing fracture of skull
X-ray of merganser showing fracture of skull
The splint is off--time for a bath!
The splint is off--time for a bath!
Standing again
Standing again
Getting ready for release
Getting ready for release

Links:

Mar 5, 2013

Thank you for providing A Place to Heal!

Beaver on
Beaver on 'Wild Cam' (raccoon friend nearby)

Fellow Mortals provided care for 1692 animals at the hospital in 2013, more than in 2011.  71 percent were successfully rehabilitated and released.

Our busiest months were May, June and July, when we admitted 1,042 of our patients.

Animals came from 90 different cities and 14 different counties.

Every success is cause for celebration, but we are especially gratified at the successful rehabilitation, release and subsequent successful integration into the wild of two beaver admitted in 2009--one an orphaned female and one an injured male yearling, who were introduced after the male had healed from his injuries and then released together last summer.   The pair recently made an appearance near their lodge during a warm spell, after making it through their first winter in the wild.

This story--and many more, have been made possible thanks to your gifts.  Often, when funds are low, it is the donations received from Global Giving that provide a 'safety net' and provide the funds for food and supplies needed by our wild patients.

Thank you for your support.  We look forward to what we can accomplish together in 2013!

Male Beaver while in care
Male Beaver while in care
Female Beaver at one month old
Female Beaver at one month old

Links:

Dec 20, 2012

A Place to Heal

Great-horned owl raised by Alberta
Great-horned owl raised by Alberta

The first babies to be admitted every year are also the last to be released.

Our foster great-horned owl, "Alberta," raised seven injured and orphaned owlets in 2012.  Great-horneds are already starting to court in the wild this time of year in the midwest, and if you're lucky enough to have owls in your neighborhood, you will hear their resonant 'hoo, hoo-hoo-hoo-, hoo-hoo!'

The eggs are incubated by the female owl for 28-30 days before the owlets hatch.  During their incubation and while the downy babies need the parent's warmth, the male owl will hunt for the entire family.

If a baby falls from the nest and is  injured (broken wings and broken legs are common), or something happens and the parents cannot provide for the young, orphans may be found by caring people and brought to Fellow Mortals for care.

Alberta came to Fellow Mortals in 1994, when she was already 14 years old.  She had been raised illegally and was imprinted on humans, so could not return to the wild.  Still--she has been able to have numerous families in captivity and is an important part of our foster-parent program, making sure that owl babies that come to Fellow Mortals learn how to be owls from another owl and grow up wild!

The pictures show two of the 7 babies Alberta was mother to in 2012.  All healed from their fractures, trauma and emaciation and were released as big beautiful wild birds in late fall.

Thank you for remembering the wild ones in this season of hope.  Our best wishes to you for a safe and peaceful holiday with family and friends,

Yvonne--for the wild ones

Great-horned owlet at admit in spring of 2012
Great-horned owlet at admit in spring of 2012
Release of great-horned owls raised by Alberta
Release of great-horned owls raised by Alberta

Links:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
  • $25
  • $50
  • $75
  • $100
  • $200
  • $500
  • $1,000
  • $10
    each month
  • $25
    each month
  • $50
    each month
  • $75
    each month
  • $100
    each month
  • $200
    each month
  • $500
    each month
  • $1,000
    each month
  • $
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital on GreatNonProfits.org.