Save the Children Federation

Save the Children is the world's leading independent organization for children. Our vision is a world in which every child attains the right to survival, protection, development and participation. Our mission is to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives.
Jan 16, 2010

Your donation is urgently needed to help Save the Children support Haitian children and families.

The January 12 earthquake and multiple aftershocks created enormous devastation and loss of life in the heavily populated city of Port-au-Prince, one of the centers for programming for Save the Children in Haiti. While staff safety and security are of immediate paramount concern, we have begun on-the- ground assessments and are designing a vigorous response strategy.

Save the Children has its main office in Port-au-Prince and sub offices in Jacmel, Massaide and Gonaives. While the main office in Port-au-Prince sustained damage and flooding from ruptured water lines, as well as damage to the perimeter wall, its condition relative to heavily damaged nearby buildings allow the property to serve as a center of activity and coordination. The three sub-offices were largely unaffected by the earthquake, most of the severe damage occurring in the actual city of Port-au-Prince.

46 out of 59 Port-au-Prince staff are accounted for as of today. Today we had teams of staff going to the areas where the unaccounted staff live to look for them.

“The destruction is everywhere and it’s still hard for emergency responders to reach many injured people at this point. Countless children and families need safe places to stay as well as basic household items to help them meet their immediate needs,” said Ian Rodgers, Save the Children’s emergency response adviser, who is currently in Haiti. “This is a major disaster that will require an intensive long-term response.”

Nov 19, 2009

KAISHAR Program- Bangladesh Progress

The KAISHAR Program is being implemented in Nasirnagar to improve adolescent health behaviors. The program will continue to ensure adolescents’ access to reproductive and sexual health information including HIV/AIDS through linking them with existing government, NGO and other community-based services. The ARSH program uses the strategy of peer education to enhance sexual health and awareness among adolescents. In FY06, the ARSH program achieved the following:

•880 male and female adolescents were oriented as peer educators and they facilitated 28,958 peer education sessions on ARSH for 8,800 male and female adolescents in the community

• 17,022 parents, in-laws and husbands received ARSH related information through 1,176 workshops

• 20,872 adolescents practiced organization and communication skills through 76 get-togethers and Adult-Adolescent Dialogues • Information regarding services was provided to 5,441 adolescents through health education sessions at satellite clinics and counseling sessions at health facilities

• TT Vaccinations were given to 3,446 female adolescent girls by government health service providers ARSH Circle at a community based information center in Bangladesh; Photograph by Bangladesh Field Staff

• 200 Health Service Providers and Village Health Practitioners received training on adolescent-friendly health services.

Strengthening Girls’ Voices In FY07, with support from the Nike Foundation, a unique cross-sectoral project for adolescent girls, named Kishoree Kontha will be implemented in three sub-districts of Barisal division. This program will strive to improve the well-being of rural adolescent girls by improving their knowledge, life and livelihood skills with the goal of poverty reduction. The experiences and lessons learned from KAISHAR program implementation will continue to be applied to this girls empowerment project.

Innovation The start of the Nike-funded program has provided a unique opportunity to partner with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to test and determine program components that can have the greatest impact on adolescent girls’ empowerment. This will add to the evidence base for effective multi-sector programming to reach adolescent girls.

Nov 19, 2009

Success Story - Education Programs in Afghanistan

Ronah (from project update)
Ronah (from project update)

Rebuilding Education in Afghanistan

Save the Children to renovate 10 schools: In districts north of Kabul, Save the Children is currently assessing facilities that will be renovated or rebuilt into 10 new schools. The assessment takes into consideration the number of school-age children in the area; whether there are large, safe places to play nearby; the level of community support and interest; and whether girls will be allowed to attend school as well as boys.

Our other educational programs in Afghanistan: Save the Children has many years of experience in working with Afghan refugees in Pakistan. In recent years, Save the Children, in cooperation with UNICEF, has led a multi-agency campaign to improve the educational environment for Afghan children in Afghanistan and in refugee villages. An “Education for Afghans” initiative assessed educational needs and outlined a strategy for increasing children’s access to education, improving the quality of education, and strengthening the capacity of the education sector.

Subsequent work has involved leading a multi-agency initiative with UNICEF to develop Basic Competencies of learning in mathematics and language (guidelines on what children should know, understand and be able to do at the end of each primary grade) and teaching-learning materials that have been included in the Interim Authority Ministry of Education’s “Back to School Campaign.” Save the Children is participating in the “Back to School” program in areas where it operates – Faryab and Sari-Pul provinces in northern Afghanistan and in Kabul Province -- by distributing education materials, conducting a school-awareness campaign, establishing Parent-Teacher Associations and by reconstructing and building schools. Where the buildings are not yet ready for children, Save the Children is helping communities set up temporary tents to house classes.

Schools “are in ruin”: But there is much to be done. A visit in March to Kabul and the Shamali Plains, one of the areas most badly affected by conflict, by Save the Children Director of Education Fred Wood illustrated that much of Afghanistan’s educational infrastructure is in ruins. “It was much, much worse than I expected,” said Wood. “It’s like a World War I battle site. Schools, where they are standing, are less like classrooms for children’s learning and more like caves, stripped of whatever materials, furniture, roofs, window frames, and doors that once made them lively centers of learning.”

Save the Children’s field office in Kabul will work with the Interim Ministry of Education and local partners, including communities, to rehabilitate 10 destroyed educational facilities in the Shamali Plains area.

Meet two Afghan girls eager to attend school: Among those children that Save the Children will be providing basic educational tools to may be Ronah and Rita, both 12-year-old girls living for now in an internally displaced persons camp in Kabul. Ronah came to the camp a year ago after living in the Shamali Plains where her family had a house and her father was a farmer. “There was fighting there very close to our house. It is better to be here than in the fighting there,” she said. Ronah attends a Save the Children school in the camp and says, “I like all of my classes but I like math the most. I like when the teacher asks questions and I can give the [correct] answers. It is important to be educated. Then I can teach others what I have learned. If there wasn’t this school I would not have anywhere to go.”

Rita says, “In Shamali, there was only a school for boys not girls, so I didn’t go to school there. There is a school now. Before we could never leave the house. Now we can go to the clinic or to school. My life is better. We have history and math. School is important because you earn about everything. You become enlightened and can read. In the future I want to be a teacher. I want to teach other people what I learned.”

Our Education Plans for Afghan Refugees in Pakistan: - In 2002, Save the Children will target 4,000 women through Non-Formal Education (NFE) in Balochistan and Haripur refugee villages in Pakistan. As part of the NFE program, women attend informal groups where they develop reading, writing and numeracy skills and where they are able to exchange and discuss ideas and information relevant to their lives.

- Save the Children’s Child-Focused Health Education program targets about 800 children between the ages of 6 and 12 in Haripur refugee villages in Pakistan. In response to the unmet demand for primary education, Save the Children will open six three-room schools in Haripur refugee villages for grade 1 boys and girls that will provide access to education for around 420 to 450 students in 2002.

- The Quetta City Schools Project supports an association of self-help Afghan schools for unregistered refugee children by providing stationery supplies and classroom materials to 42 schools with 14,000 students, and by strengthening the organizational capacity of the association.

- Save the Children supports some 100 primary schools, including home-based girls schools with a total number of nearly 17,000 students enrolled in Balochistan in Pakistan. Save the Children provides teacher training, classroom resources, textbooks and stationery, teacher salaries, and some building materials. Save the Children also works with communities to develop and strengthen Parent Teacher Associations and to increase interest in education. A School Health and Nutrition Initiative promotes nutrition and hygiene education and supports schools to carry out vitamin A supplementation.

Rita (from project update)
Rita (from project update)

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