The Mountain Fund

The mission of The Mountain Fund is to eliminate poverty, its causes and symptoms, in developing mountain communities around the world.
Apr 22, 2013

The first class graduates and gets jobs

Women at the ceremony for graduation
Women at the ceremony for graduation

I was delighted to attend a ceremony for the first graduating class of women that took place in Nepal last month. 68 women graduates were all there. Of the 68 who completed the course, only 3 were still having problems getting a drivers license. 4 were now employed full-time as drivers and the rest have started a savings cooperative into which each will put some money. When there is enough money, they will buy a taxi, then 4 of the women will operate that taxi and use the income to help buy another one until all have work. 

The course they completed covered how to drive a car, how to repair a car and personal self-defense. We plan to start another class for 32 more women in May. See the photos from the ceremony. 

With Bishnu Gautam, the program director
With Bishnu Gautam, the program director
Apr 22, 2013

Housing built with volunteer labor nearly complete

The nearly finished house
The nearly finished house

This past month 34 high school students volunteered to build a house for women at Her Farm. Previously, one volunteer from Colorado had spent two weeks putting in the foundation for the first "earth bag" house to be built in this part of Nepal. The students then spent one week and were able to finish 50% + of the house. Consisting of 4 rooms, each one 18ft by 18ft, it's a large structure that involved hundreds of hours of labor to complete. Earth bag housing is built using rice bags which are filled with dirt, stacked as you would bricks or cement blocks with barbed wire acting as mortar, then compacted with a heavy tamper. A steel and concrete ring beam around the top of the entire structure ties all the walls together for strength. It's an environmentally great way to build and provides a home that is also free from chemicals. We finished our earth bag house off with mud plaster and a metal roof. We've just to finish the floors inside the rooms and it will be ready for occupancy. 

During construction
During construction
Walls getting higher
Walls getting higher
Our volunteers
Our volunteers
Applying mud plaster
Applying mud plaster
Apr 22, 2013

An unexpected surprise, and a nice one too

The award
The award

While I was still outside of Kathmandu at Her Farm (another project here on Global Giving) I received several messages that I simply must come to Kathmandu the next Saturday. The messages came from a couple of young people I knew in Kathmandu but the reason I "must" come was not clear. I wasn't even sure I'd be in the city on that day. As fate would have it, I did need to make a run from the farm to Kathmandu, so early on Friday I made the one hour walk from the farm to the town of Madavbesi where I boarded a local bus bound for Kathmandu. 

Saturday morning I had instructions to arrive at a place located near to a prominent government building for an 11am meeting. I set off by taxi for the location and owing to a communication breakdown between myself and the driver ended up somewhere near, but not actually at, the location I was to be at by 11am. As it was 10:45am when I left the taxi, or it left me, still not sure about that, I hurried off in what I hoped was the right direction. 

Why I hurried was of course a momentary lapse of memory. There's 11am, and then there is 11am Nepali time, which could mean anything from an hour or two different. I arrived at the destination and entered a room filled with exactly three people. Sure enough, in keeping with Nepali time, by 11:30am the room was full. 

I was the only non-Nepali in the room and frankly still wasn't sure why I was there. I did recognize several other people in attendance but before I could speak to them, someone took the podium and starting announcements in Nepali, a language I know only a few words of. 

One by one people were called to the stage and given awards for being social contributers. I supposed I had been invited by one of the recipients to witness their receiving this award. I was wrong. My name was announced, I was requested to join the others on the stage as the announcer told the crowd about my work for the past decade in Nepal and my current work at Nepal Youth Network. 

It's quite an honor for me to be awarded by the youth of Nepal and be recognized by them. I am certainly glad I made it and made it on-time and on Nepali time. (and yes, it does say for "her" outstanding performance. No, I am not a her, but it's Nepal and that's how it goes) 

Only non-Nepali on the stage
Only non-Nepali on the stage

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