Mali Health Organizing Project

Mali Health empowers Sikoro, an impoverished urban community in Mali, West Africa to transform maternal and child health sustainably. We do so by: -Fostering the agency of residents and community structures to mobilize to address community health needs. -Promoting health education, prevention, and early care seeking. -Enhancing financial, geographic, and cultural access to health care for poor families.
Jun 11, 2012

Evaluating our Prenatal Care Pilot

Health Education Lesson
Health Education Lesson

Late last year, we introduced to you to our expanded maternal health program, an initiative within Action for Health aimed at empowering women with the critical knowledge and access to services they need to ensure a safe pregnancy, delivery, and recovery, in a country where 1 in 22 women will die from complications during childbirth. After a six-month pilot, our medical coordinator, Dr. Diak Traore took some time to reflect on the current program and where to go next.

In all, 43 women took part in the program. All of them received frequent and focused visits from our team of Community Health Workers, encouraging safe decisions and relaying warning signs throughout the courses of their pregnancy. 84% of women (36) also elected to participate in prenatal consultations at the Clinic. Among these participants, 35 have either completed, or are currently on track to complete, their own individual series of 4 consultations. At this time of Dr. Traore’s report, 12 women had given birth, 8 of whom in a health facility. The entire team was rightly proud of their work, most notably in the case of a woman who experienced complications during labor and delivery but was able to receive the medical care she needed, with her election to deliver at the health center.

Overall, we were encouraged by the participation and impact of the program. The pilot, however, shed light on areas to improve, largely related to restrictive cost barriers. While the program does in fact cover some associated fees, others were left to be financed by the husband, as is customarily the case in our community. However, the 7 women who did not participate in prenatal care cited high clinical costs as a barrier. Further, of the 4 women who gave birth at home, 3 identified related costs of delivery in a health center as a primary deterrence, and one, tragically, experienced a miscarriage.

This summer, we will be doubling the size of Action for Health, and with it, expanding the prenatal care program.  We are currently considering the most effective ways to reduce these cost barriers while reaching more women.

As our program grows, so too can your impact. This June, to support our efforts, all funds given will be matched, dollar for dollar. And, through Global Giving’s additional support, this Wednesday, June 13, all donations will be matched a further 50%, turning a $20 gift into $50 for our program. To give, just follow the link below.

Thank you for your continued support as Action for Health grows in both depth and breadth, and I look forward to sharing continued updates of its expansion. I hope you will consider participating, and help us reach more women with this program.  

Waiting at the Clinic
Waiting at the Clinic

Links:

Mar 7, 2012

Community-Led Development

Bandiagara Coura
Bandiagara Coura

Since May 2011, the 10 members of the Bandiagara Coura Action Group have been hard at work making their hill-side community healthier. Bandiagara Coura is named after the famous Dogon escarpment, and its steep hills and rock-homes evoke Mali's famous tourist destination. Given the difficulty residents have accessing water, electricity, roads and schools, it is also one the most underprivileged parts of the Sikoro neighborhood. 

After an intensive training on community activism by Mali Health’s Mobilization Coordinator Dramane Diarra, the Action Group members went to work developing programs to improve the health and well-being of their neighbors. One of their first activities was to conduct a census of the population of Bandiagara Coura. The members of the Action Group realized that without a clear picture of who resided in the neighborhood, and the number of people living there, they would be unable to plan and execute activities. The Action Group surveyed over 1200 families living in Bandiagara Coura and gathered valuable information about the population (such as the fact that certain households essentially as dormitories for people who work in downtown Bamako) and community relations (for example, some residents have a negative view of the sector chief, dating to the time when the land was divided). All of this information will allow the group to effectively plan and implement activities.

Following the census, the Action Group began work on their first community improvement program: paving the three main roads in Bandiagara Coura. Ama, the Action Group president said, "Paving the roads will make it easier to leave Bandiagara Coura. Today, if someone falls ill, they have to climb down the hill, or someone has to carry them down the hill, to the main road before they can find a car or bus, as these vehicles cannot drive up the hill.” In addition to reducing access to health care, the poor road quality means that women and children have limited access to piped water, which is only located in the valley. More than 5 years ago, the sector chief had directed an activity to pave some of the roads, but others remain unfinished. In order to improve access between Bandiagara Coura and the rest of the neighborhood, the Action Group plans to pave 3 roads. In order to make these roads usable for motor vehicles, they have to do everything from dynamiting rock to make the road wider, building retaining walls, and filling in sunken land.

To achieve their goal, the Action Group has solicited donations from community members to pay for cement and sand, and youth have contributed labor to the project. This is an ongoing project, but the start has been very fruitful and close to 70% of Action for Health families have participated in the project. The sector chief says: "It has been a dream of mine to see public transport in Bandiagara Coura, and we need good roads for this to become a reality." (Bamia, chef de secteur).

Bandiagara Coura
Bandiagara Coura
Dec 9, 2011

Transforming Maternal Health

Health Worker Ami Keita with her youngest daughter
Health Worker Ami Keita with her youngest daughter

Over 18 months ago, Action for Health launched to address child health by providing free services for children, health education, and opportunities for families to engage in local health projects. Today we’re excited to announce the start of our expanded maternal health initiative, designed to empower women with critical health knowledge and services to ensure a safe pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum recovery.

1 in 22 women in Mali die of maternal health complications (UNICEF). Most of these deaths are caused by preventable and treatable conditions, like hemorrhaging, infections, high blood pressure, and obstructed labor. Under our new maternal health initiative, we are excited to offer enrolled mothers expanded health education, free prenatal consultations, accompaniment, and follow up to connect them with medical providers. The heart of the initiative is our Community Health Worker team, composed of local residents (most of them mothers themselves) with training in health promotion.

Our Community Health Workers work one-on-one with women in their homes, reviewing lessons such as maternal nutritional needs, birth spacing, the purpose of prenatal visits, and recommended breastfeeding practices. Under the new initiative, Health Workers also accompany mothers on prenatal consultations (now free of charge), work with them and their husbands to plan for transportation and logistics of the birth, and are on-call for deliveries. An emergency fund is now available for complex pregnancies requiring specialized services. Executive Director Anna Ninan states: “Health knowledge and agency are infectious: when one women learns to safeguard her health she shares that information with her family and friends, empowering others around her. At the same time, we have to recognize the critical role of health services, especially for those who might not be able to afford them as is the case for much of Sikoro. We’re excited to be breaking down those financial barriers to care by providing free services.”

Want to support Action for Health further? Consider making a contribution in honor of a loved one as a holiday gift. To give, click below to give and select "gift in honor of."

http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/actionforhealth-prevent-90-of-child-death-mali/

Health Workers education cards on prenatal care
Health Workers education cards on prenatal care

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