International Medical Corps

International Medical Corps is a global humanitarian nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through healthcare training, disaster relief, and long-term development programs.
Sep 9, 2014

Empowering Women in DRC through International Medical Corps' Women in Leadership project

WiLead project participant
WiLead project participant

International Medical Corps’ Women in Leadership (WiLead) project began in August 2012 with the goal of strengthening existing and creating new women leadership roles and promoting an environment that supports and encourages future women leaders in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This project was designed to train women in organizational development and management skills, empowering them to become more effective leaders; increase the understanding of women’s leadership roles in their communities; and teach communities the importance and benefits of establishing women-friendly leadership structures.

The WiLead project partnered with 434 religious, traditional and political leaders (159 of which were women) and challenged them through training sessions, workshops, discussions and debates, to change traditional laws that discriminate against women and girls and create space for women’s participation in leadership positions.  After the program, and with the support of local women’s associations, women experienced tangible gains in their communities: 21 women were nominated in the council of elders in Kalonge; religious leaders offered a piece of land for women to construct a small hut for meetings instead of meeting at the river or farms where they are at risk of attack by armed groups; one women was nominated to the tribal council in both Bukavu and Bunyakiri; and women representatives are now attending security briefing meeting held each week at the Bunyakiri Administration office.

To further nurture future women leaders and educate adolescents on gender equality, International Medical Corps supported the creation of adolescent clubs where mentors worked to develop a positive perception of women and girls in their community. In total, 28 adolescent clubs were created and educated participants through open discussions between boys and girls on gender issues, good citizenship, peaceful coexistence, and positive ambitions. Girls-only sessions helped young women develop positive ambitions and draw on female leaders from their communities as role models. A total of 672 adolescents (332 girls) participated in the adolescent club activities.

Below is a story from a female participant in an International Medical Corps-supported adolescent club:

I am a 16 year old student at Cholobera institute, and I started participating in adolescent club discussions in August, 2014. It was the first time that I participated in a discussion where everyone was expected to express their own point of view. At the beginning, it was difficult for me and all the girls to speak before the boys and give a different opinion, because it is against our culture to disagree with boys in front of other boys. Little by little, the facilitator encouraged us to express ourselves, and I started gaining enough confidence to do so without feeling shame or fear. We continued having discussion sessions, and as we went along, I realized the sessions were helping me recognize my potential as a leader instead of simply helping me express myself in front of others.

Before joining the club, I had no ambitions and lacked knowledge regarding many things. I never knew what rights men and women had, nor did I know that there were special laws that protected children. I was also never taught about hygiene; sexually transmitted infections; the consequences of unwanted pregnancies; or even the menstrual cycle, because these subjects are not taught in school. The mentors at the adolescent club taught me about these legal and health subjects, which empowered me to take ownership of my future and become an active participant in my community. If I had not joined the adolescent club, I may have taken a very different path.   

When I was 14 years old, I thought about dropping out of school to get married just as my older sisters had done. Fortunately, the Women in Leadership project started and I realized that it was not the time to think about marriage, because there were more important things to do. After participating in the program, I decided to get my certificate and then go to university in Bukavu. I started taking my studies more seriously and I became the second best student in my class. My parents noticed a change in my behavior and achievements, and are now giving me the same responsibility as my older brothers. My father wants my sisters to join the adolescent club, and he is encouraging me to avoid relationships with boys so that I can focus on my dreams. When I am done with university, I plan on coming back to shape the future of Kalonge.

I believe that I can truly make a difference in my community, because International Medical Corps already helped us deliver a project rehabilitating water sources in Kalonge. Access to clean water represents one of the biggest needs in Kalonge, and through this project, we were able to show the community that young people had an important role to play in its development while helping resolve a problem that even adults had not been able to solve.

With the support of Kalonge women leaders, our club decided to expand into the neighboring village to continue safe-guarding our leadership ambitions, and to give a similar chance to young women in other communities.”

Sep 9, 2014

Basic Disaster Training and Emergency Evacuation Kits for People with Disabilities

Training Participants at Futaba-no-Sato
Training Participants at Futaba-no-Sato

Between July 23 and 25, 2014, International Medical Corps and AAR Japan provided basic disaster training and distributed emergency evacuation kits to individuals working and/or receiving services at the Kibou no Mori Welfare Association. Kibou no Mori runs several job-creation facilities for Persons with Disabilities (PWDs), as well as a rehabilitation center to help PWDs develop the skills they need to live independently in their community.

Over the three-day period, International Medical Corps’ Country Representative, Yumi Terahata, and AAR Japan’s Project Coordinator, Atsushi Naoe, visited 6 Kibou no Mori facilities to provide emergency preparedness training to residents and to distribute 212 emergency evacuation kits. During the training sessions, we emphasized the importance of being mentally and physically prepared for an emergency, such as: having an emergency plan with family and loved ones; stocking enough food, drinking water and water for daily needs in the home for at least three days; and writing out the names of medication, emergency contact numbers, and other important details, and always carrying around this information in case support is needed.

The Kibou no Mori facilities that employ PWDs and were visited by International Medical Corps for training and emergency evacuation kits included:

Keyaki Kyodo Sagyojo: Makes and delivers lunch boxes to regular customers, as well as, provides lunch delivery services for the elderly at the bequest of Iwaki City.

Kobo Keyaki: Under the philosophy of “Jisan-Jishou (produce locally, consume locally)”, this facility uses locally-grown soybeans to make “Iwaki-made tofu” and delivers this product to customers. This studio also runs a small café where customers can buy side dishes, tofu products and lunch boxes.

Atelier Kitayama: This facility uses the tofu and soy pulp produced at Kobo Keyaki to make donuts and cookies. They also make various side dishes. The staff also sells these products door-to-door.

Mori-no-Donuts: This shop makes and sells a wide variety of fried and baked donuts out of soy pulp. PWDs are on both the sides of production and customer service.

Futaba-no-Sato: The PWDs working at this facility collect old paper for recycling and create tin-buttons, rusk snacks, and small accessories.

Friends Kitayama: This facility assists PWDs in developing the skills necessary to live independently within the community. Here, they learn a wide range of life skills ranging from safety, both inside and outside the home; manners and etiquette; health and nutrition; simple budgeting, etc.

During the Tohoku Earthquake of 2011, the Keyaki Kyodo Sagyojo facility became an emergency evacuation center for the PWDs working there. More than 20 PWDs sheltered in the building, including 7 individuals who had to be evacuated from another Kibo no Mori facility located in Naraha, a town in close proximity to the nuclear power plant accident. Mr. Sugawara, the director-general of Kibou no Mori, spoke about his experience running this facility as a makeshift emergency shelter. 

"They all had to survive at Keyaki for a week until they received assistance from the local government. Fortunately, they had drinking water from a nearby well and collected water to flush the toilet from the river. They were also lucky in that they had food in stock, usually used for the bento services they provided."

This experience made Mr. Sugawara realize how Keyaki has the potential to also function as an emergency shelter for the community. Whereas during the Tohoku disaster they could only provide shelter and care for their users, Mr. Sugawara would like the facility to also be able to provide assistance to other vulnerable individuals in the community, such as the neighborhood elderly.

Yumi Terahata explaining disaster prep basics
Yumi Terahata explaining disaster prep basics
participant showing some evacuation kit contents
participant showing some evacuation kit contents
Participants examining a bag of emergency rations
Participants examining a bag of emergency rations
Sep 9, 2014

Preparing Persons with Disabilities for a Disaster through an Emergency Shelter Simulation

Yoshiyuki Komatsu explaining the day
Yoshiyuki Komatsu explaining the day's schedule

On July 26, 2014, International Medical Corps and AAR Japan, in partnership with the local PWD-support organization Iwaki Jiritsu Seikatsu Center, conducted an emergency shelter simulation focused on the needs of PWDs, the first exercise of its kind in Japan. Over 70 people took part in this exercise, including 21 PWDs (11 visually-impaired, 9 physically disabled, and 1 hearing-impaired), 20 caregivers, and 11 junior high and high school students. The event took place in the gymnasium of Iwaki City’s Nakoso Second Junior High School, as school gymnasiums are the typical venue for an emergency evacuation shelter in Japan.

The day was divided into morning and afternoon sessions. The morning session, themed “Discovery,” split the PWDs, their caregivers, and non-PWDs into 4 groups and had them take turns participating in separate activities at 4 “checkpoints”. Each group had a “navigator” to explain the rules of each activity and to encourage the PWDs to take the lead in identifying problems and brainstorming solutions.

Checkpoint 1: “Barriers” – finding the various obstacles in a typical emergency shelter: People with different disabilities often experience obstacles in different ways. The participants explored the gymnasium and listed all the different barriers they found. They also discussed the various obstacles they faced in order to reach the gymnasium, such as navigating an extremely steep staircase and having to walk on slippery gravel. Those in wheelchairs had to be carried up the stairs by four people.

Checkpoint 2: “My Own Space”: A small-scale cardboard mockup of a “typical” emergency shelter was created in the center of the gymnasium, complete with narrow pathways, cardboard separations, etc. PWD participants were encouraged to explore the space and think about which spot in the gymnasium would be the best place to set up their living space. Individuals with visual impairments chose spaces near walls so that they could use them to feel their way as they walked around the gym, while individuals in wheelchairs tended to choose spaces near exits and toilets.

Checkpoint 3: “Items Available and Unavailable”: This exercise challenged participants to think about what necessary items they need depending on their particular type of disability, and check whether they could fulfill that need in the shelter. A selection of various objects and materials were then placed on a table in front of the participants, and they were encouraged to be creative in thinking how they would use different items to suit their needs.

Checkpoint 4: “Communicating”: PWDs were asked to think about what kind of assistance they would need (e.g., medication, specific assistance, dietary restrictions, etc.) and to practice conveying vital information at a mock registration desk. Additionally, participants wrote notes to check the status of loved ones, and taped them to a message board, which was a form of communication commonly used during the Tohoku disaster.

After the morning session, all the participants enjoyed a simple lunch consisting of “alpha-rice”, which is instant rice that can be made with either hot or cold water and often stored as emergency rations in places designated as emergency evacuation shelters. The participants commented that the rice tasted better than they expected.

In the afternoon, three additional activities were held:

Creating an “SOS Card”: All participants created their own SOS cards with their vital information, including emergency contact numbers, the names of their medication, allergies, illness or handicap, prosthetics, needed medical equipment, etc.

Making My Own Space: PWDs created their own “living quarters” in the gymnasium using various material available, such as gym mats, chairs, cardboard, etc. Other participants assisted the PWDs with using duct tape, cutters and scissors.

Supporting the Visually-Impaired: Mr. Wataru Murai, president of the Iwaki Social Welfare Association for the Blind, taught non-visually-impaired participants some pointers on how to guide visually-impaired individuals. A 30-foot obstacle course was also set up so that participants could use a blindfold and walking stick to experience a little of what it is like to be visually-impaired. In turn, visually-impaired participants borrowed the wheelchairs of those with physical disabilities and experienced what it is like to not be able to walk on their own.

At the end of the session, a final discussion was held where all participants could share their thoughts and lessons learned from the day’s activities. The lessons learned during this exercise will be utilized in the second emergency shelter simulation for PWDs that will be conducted in early October, 2014.

Discussing hazards posed by the slippery floor
Discussing hazards posed by the slippery floor
attempting to navigate the mock-up via wheelchair
attempting to navigate the mock-up via wheelchair
navigating the mock-up using a walking stick
navigating the mock-up using a walking stick
Junior-High School students handing out lunches
Junior-High School students handing out lunches
Sae (center) relaxing in her space with friends
Sae (center) relaxing in her space with friends

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