International Medical Corps

International Medical Corps is a global humanitarian nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through healthcare training, disaster relief, and long-term development programs.
Oct 30, 2012

We Are So Close

We are only $24,307 away from reaching our campaign goal of $185,000! And thanks to an exciting campaign through Global Giving, this is our chance to reach it.

Between November 1 and 15, Global Giving will match your donations to our Japan projects dollar for dollar. If you donate $50, it becomes $100. If you donate $250, it becomes $500. You get the picture. Here’s why it matters:

As you well know, International Medical Corps was on the ground 48 hours after Japan’s tsunami and earthquake. We delivered essential items and health services to thousands of displaced families and evacuees—everything from food to household items to heaters and stoves for the cold winter months.  And we stayed—because healing hearts and minds doesn’t happen overnight.

In the past several months, International Medical Corps has focused on addressing the trauma of Japanese citizens by providing vital mental health services and training local health providers. For example, we trained 86 staff members of the Tokyo English Life Line and 93 other frontline workers in psychological first aid and held 8 workshops for 300 parents and teachers on how to create a supportive environment for children.

International Medical Corps has also created several safe community spaces and forged long-term partnerships with local NGOs to link evacuees with critically-needed social services and support networks.  For example, we run a daycare facility, in partnership with the International Volunteer Center of Yamagata, for the children of Fukushima evacuees and maintain several community spaces where all persons affected by the disaster can interact with one another and obtain essential information regarding relevant services.

Through these efforts and many more, we are helping to bring host and evacuee communities together to engage in community-building activities and support each other through Japan’s rebuilding process.

But we need your help to keep going.

Making a donation between November 1 and November 15 doubles your impact and ensures that International Medical Corps can continue to provide critical services to the Japanese people.

This means that we can reach our goal and, together, we can help heal Japan.

So make your donation today to make your donation count twice!

The three main areas of Tohoku that were affected by the March 2011 earthquake/tsunami include Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima, where the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was damaged and people remain evacuated from their homes. All of International Medical Corps’ current projects focus on Fukushima. 

Global Giving’s “Tohoku Recovery Matching Campaign” will provide $100,000 in matching funds to projects that are related to earthquake and tsunami recovery activities in Tohoku, Japan. All (online ONLY) donations through Global Giving will be matched 100%, up to $1,000 per donor and $25,000 per organization. The campaign runs from 12:01am on November 1 to midnight on November 15, 2012.

Oct 30, 2012

Hurricane Sandy in Haiti: An Update

We’re writing to update you on Haiti in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which has caused at least 51 deaths across the island nation so far. Late last week, the powerful storm ravaged Haiti, where 370,000 people still live in flimsy shelter and tent camps following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Eighty-four displacement camps were damaged, as were countless homes, businesses, roads and bridges

New outbreaks of cholera have been reported in Haiti, with more expected in the coming days. Extensive damage to agriculture, livestock and fisheries across the country has raised serious concerns about food insecurity and malnutrition—which will hit children under 2 years old and pregnant women hardest. Other critical needs—such as health, shelter and supplies—will persist for some time.

International Medical Corps has been working with local government agencies on the ground to coordinate the emergency response. We are adding additional mobile medical units (MMUs) in the most affected areas in the south and west, and expanding the coverage of our existing MMUs to respond to both primary health care needs and cholera outbreaks. We are also mobilizing to address the urgent needs of approximately 10,000 internally displaced persons staying in temporary shelters.

We will continue to update you on the situation in Haiti as well as our emergency response there.

Further, as the hurricane hits the U.S., we hope that you and your loved ones stay safe and healthy.

With many thanks for your support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

Oct 28, 2012

Hurricane Wreaks Havoc in Haiti

Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy
Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy has been sweeping through the Caribbean causing extensive damage. We’re writing to let you know that International Medical Corps is mobilizing to respond in Haiti. 

Twenty one deaths have been reported so far and Haitian President Michel Martelly has declared a state of emergency. International Medical Corps’ Haiti teams are collaborating with local government and United Nations agencies to coordinate the emergency response. We're prepositioning emergency kits, fuel and flashlights at all of our sites. In addition, we have Mobile Medical Units on standby to assist in reaching affected communities.

Thousands of people still live in tent camps following Haiti’s 2010 earthquake and heavy flooding from the hurricane has only exacerbated their vulnerability. Roads are badly damaged, bridges have been swept away, and the main hospital in Les Cayes remains flooded. Heavy rains continue and the Gray River, located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, has overflowed—taking away homes and businesses. The main road linking Haiti to the Dominican Republic is also badly damaged, making it nearly impossible for vehicles to cross the border.

As crops throughout the country have been severely damaged, there are serious concerns about food insecurity, adding to the already precarious nutrition status of the population—particularly for children under 2 years old.

As a stakeholder in International Medical Corps’ Haiti relief efforts, we know that you are deeply concerned about the health, safety and wellbeing of Haitians. We will continue to update you as the situation progresses.

Many thanks for your continual support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

donate now:

An anonymous donor is matching all new monthly recurring donations. Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $65
    give
  • $135
    give
  • $600
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $65
    each month
    give
  • $135
    each month
    give
  • $600
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of International Medical Corps

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about International Medical Corps on GreatNonProfits.org.