International Medical Corps

International Medical Corps is a global humanitarian nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through healthcare training, disaster relief, and long-term development programs.
Mar 1, 2013

The Transition From Relief to Self-Reliance

Injury Rehabilitation
Injury Rehabilitation

 With International Medical Corps’ help, Libya continues the transition from conflict to rebuilding. International Medical Corps has shifted attention from Emergency Medical Care to rehabilitation services for the injured and disabled (or those born with disabilities).

In addition to providing support to hospitals and clinics, International Medical Corps also worked with local groups for the disabled to strengthen the capacity of leadership, host community events, and provide vital information on health care and well-being.

One such group, The Blue Eye, was established in April 2012 in Jadu, Libya, to address the needs for people with disabilities in the Western Mountains.

“We said to ourselves that the situation has changed, and now we have a free Libya. Disabled persons need their rights, but before they get their rights, they need to know them and demand them,” says Anwar, one of the Founders of The Blue Eye. In addition to the capacity-building activities, International Medical Corps also trained senior members of The Blue Eye and provided the organization with tool kits and training to manage home modifications and home assessments for construction of ramps and accessible entrances.

“Our aim was to empower these organizations in the Western Mountains by providing them with the tools and knowledge about standard measurements for building ramps and modifying home entrances as part of their field work with the disabled persons in the Western Mountains,” said Fadi Daccache, International Medical Corps’ occupational therapy specialist.

This is just one example of International Medical Corps’ work in Libya. In 2013, International Medical Corps will continue to provide support to Libyan health facilities for rehabilitation and related medical and community activities. We thank you for your generosity, and hope you will continue to support our efforts in Libya.

 

 

Feb 28, 2013

Marking Two Years Since the Earthquake and Tsunami

It has been two years since a 9.0 earthquake devastated Japan, initiating a massive tsunami and radiation crisis. International Medical Corps is still responding in Japan, and this is your chance to support our work. Global Giving is matching donations one-to-one from March 1st to March 15th, up to $1,000 per donor. Your donation will immediately be doubled, amplifying International Medical Corps’ efforts two-fold.

It gets better. On March 11th, to mark the two-year anniversary of the earthquake, Global Giving will match donations two-to-one, up to $1,000 per donor. Your ten-dollar donation becomes thirty dollars. Your hundred-dollar donation becomes $300. Your $1,000 donation becomes $3,000. This unique opportunity to multiply your gift enables International Medical Corps to continue our critical efforts in Japan.

Today, International Medical Corps continues to work in Japan, partnering with local organizations to reach families with critical services in Fukushima Prefecture.

“Due to complications from the nuclear plant accident, many residents have been forced to evacuate their homes in Fukushima and are still living either in temporary housing sites or in rented apartments. Countless survivors are still struggling to rebuild their lives after the disaster without knowing when or if they can return home,” says Yumi Terahata, International Medical Corps’ Country Representative in Japan.  “International Medical Corps is committed to working with local partners to address the long-term needs of the Japanese people.”

Today, International Medical Corps has built on its collaboration with local Japanese agencies to address ongoing humanitarian needs and support disaster-affected communities in becoming more resilient.

  • International Medical Corps, with the Japan Volunteer Center, Shapla Neer, and the People, now run community spaces throughout Fukushima Prefecture where evacuees can meet other evacuees; receive psychological support and information about available sources; and, take part in recreational workshops and activities.
  • International Medical Corps is also focusing support on Fukushima’s evacuee-children. With the Association for Aid and Relief, International Medical Corps is installing playground equipment for Gangoya Temporary Housing Complex, which is home to 264 children. With partner IVY, International Medical Corps is supporting the first daycare center for children of evacuee families from Fukushima, hiring evacuee-mothers as the majority of IVY caretakers.
  • International Medical Corps is funding the NGO Center for International Cooperation to establish and maintain a collaboration space for non-governmental organizations in Fukushima to facilitate information dissemination, networking, and collaboration among local community-based organizations, nonprofits, and international NGOs to assist Fukushima survivors and displaced families.

This is your chance to help.

Only $100,000 is available for matching funds, so donate now!

International Medical Corps thanks you for your continued support and interest in our Japan programming. We look forward to giving you continued updates on the Global Giving site, and encourage you to visit www.internationalmedicalcorps.org for further information on our programming worldwide.

Feb 20, 2013

Changing Attitudes and Behaviors in the Congo

Women work on livlihood activities in the DRC
Women work on livlihood activities in the DRC

UN officials have called DRC the epicenter of rape as a weapon of war, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited rape victims in eastern Congo in 2009 in an effort to draw more attention to one of Africa’s most disturbing conflicts.

In the DRC, International Medical Corps takes a holistic approach to addressing violence against women, so that survivors have access to medical, psychosocial, legal, economic, and social resources needed to recover as well as work with communities to prevent and reduce violence against women.  We offer case management and  emotional support services for survivors of GBV. We also provide legal services, livelihoods training and economic opportunities to help survivors recover and become self-reliant. 

Over the last 2 years in North and South Kivu, International Medical Corps has: 

  • Trained 460 service providers in GBV clinical care for survivors.
  • Treated 1,762 GBV survivors in accordance with national treatment protocols.
  • Provided 842 survivors with post-exposure prophylaxis.

Justice for victims of violence is elusive in DRC. Perpetrators of violence walk free within days—if ever caught in the first place. What’s more, social stigma prevents women from seeking treatment or reporting attacks.

 

But, International Medical Corps is working to change attitudes towards women.

“Community leaders in Bukavu were called for training on women in leadership. When I heard, I was not interested in attending, but the M’ze (chief) sent me to represent him. For me, it was a women’s issue. Though I have daughters, I have never thought I have something to discuss with them. And these young women came (project facilitator) and talked about how girls can face problems outside of home, in schools, in the street and how they need our support as family heads, as parents. On the second day, we discussed the benefit of including girls at all level of decisions. 

I felt impressed and touched by the message. I have four daughters whom I had never find necessary to discuss something different from my food to be served. From this training venue, I think I will start to start.‘’

-60-year-old man , Bukavu

International Medical Corps’ efforts in the Democratic Republic of Congo focus not only on women, but also on their families. The participant quoted above took part in a training session on the inclusion of women in decision-making for community and religious leaders. The workshop included both men and women, and discussed topics from the principles of community mobilization to the legal instruments that protect women and advocacy. These topics are key to educating communities about women’s rights.

Workshops like the one described above bring together community leaders and empower them to create change within their own families. By educating community elders – and their sons, daughters, wives and husbands, International Medical Corps helps leaders set an example for the entire community, changing the way women and girls are treated.

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