Sambhali Trust

Sambhali Trust's Goals We, being Sambhali Trust, a grassroots women's empowerment non-profit organization in Jodhpur who works almost exclusively with Dalit women and girls, are teaching our members how to become independent and self sustained. We do not offer pure handouts. This concept is what makes our organization and promotion of women's empowerment successful, which is shown through how Sambhali Trust was only created a few years ago and already is affecting the lives of over three hundred.
Aug 26, 2014

Post Project Funding: A Visit From a Traveler

Sambhali kids showing off their skill
Sambhali kids showing off their skill

The following is a postcard from Neeharika Tummala, GlobalGiving's In-the-Field Representative in India and Bangladesh, about her recent visit to Sambhali Trust.

I was super excited to visit this organization as my interaction with the founder – Govind, was so welcoming and friendly, I wanted to skip all the site visits in between and get to Jodhpur, Rajasthan directly. Unfortunately, a few days before I found out that Govind’s brother passed away and so I wasn’t sure if I would even get to visit the family. However, when I got there, despite the grief, Govind still make a site visit possible for me. Thanks to Govind, an amazing team of volunteers and staff, I got to meet the ladies and their children who benefit from the Sambhali Trust.

Sambhali is housed within a beautiful guest house that Govind runs. The NGO section is also beautiful with inspiring paintings, women learning sewing in one corner, and practicing in another corner. The best part is that the environment is really kids friendly – while mothers study, the children are free to play and stay occupied with books and games. You can see the enthusiasm for photos as they pose for my camera. By the time you leave Sambhali, you can’t help but feel really positive about the world and that good things are happening.

A major strength of Sambhali are its volunteers, who come from all over the world for extended volunteering stints. They contribute their design and organizational knowledge as well as skills and continuously improve the organization. After the training center, I went to the advanced sewing center, where women were busy fulfilling an order they had received. There they create the cutest stuffed toys which are not only sold at the Sambhali Boutique, but also go on order to other countries. These stuffed toys have great designs, thanks to ideas from the volunteers and the creativity of the women, and looked so tempting I wanted to steal a stuffed elephant and the mermaid lion, which was my personal favorite. Thank you Sambhali for the site visit and great memories! I definitely hope to be back there someday, stay at the guest house, volunteer and spread some Sambhali love! 

A beautiful work environment
A beautiful work environment
A class running on the side
A class running on the side
I get to spend some time with the kids
I get to spend some time with the kids
At the advanced sewing center
At the advanced sewing center
Aug 11, 2014

Sheerni Self-Help Group Project Update

Meera making dhal and palak in Nutrition workshop
Meera making dhal and palak in Nutrition workshop

In January 2014, a new group started (Group 9) with 12 new women. We explained to the women how the groups work and the rules, opening a bank account and starting to deposit monthly savings. Another 11 women were also keen to join in this project and so we established Group 10 in May 2014 and they also have recently opened a bank account. They are all keen to take loans through Sambhali, because the interest is low, (Per 100 rupees there is 1 rupee decreasing interest).

There are now 112 women in 10 Groups within this Project.

The women have attended the monthly meetings, taken by Manju Mehta, Sambhali Trust’s Project Co-ordinator, although some months the women have needed to attend to the crops in their fields, but the women in all the groups have attended regularly except unfortunately Solyankiyatala, who found it difficult to attend and who haven’t appeared to be committed enough despite repeated encouragement from Mrs Mehta. The Founder/Director of Sambhali Trust, Mr. Govind Singh Rathore, also travels regularly to Setrawa and has a discussion with the women and explains how Sambhali can help them.

Apart from Solyankiyatala, 99% of the women have been increasingly active and confident in wanting to take out loans to purchase goats, cows, flour grinding machines and start small shops and even to buy equipment to help with the construction of their house.  The groups have been very successful in paying their loans and the table below shows how many loans have been given out to all the groups in 2013-14.

Where some members have been unable to get loans, or cannot afford to take out a loan, with the help of Global Giving some donations have also been provided in the form of goats and cows which have been given to selected members of the groups which has also helped some members to pay their electricity bills where they have been unable to do so.  Those members who receive these donations are suggested by the members of each group, who agree that those women are in particularly difficult circumstances and need direct help.

The women are very happy, motivated and empowered by their increased ability to be able to help themselves by starting these small businesses and also many of their children are either attending Sambhali’s Empowerment Centre in Setrawa or are being sponsored through Sambhali to go to school. There are also now 20 children from Setrawa going to school in Jodhpur as part of the Sheerni Educational Programme which has considerably improved the educational standard of these girls as well as providing an optimistic future. The ongoing success and establishment of Sambhali’s Empowerment Centre in Setrawa has helped to be the central core around which many activities are provided by the staff and volunteers that also encompass the these women and their families. A second empowerment centre also opened in June 2014 approx. 5 km from Setrawa in an outlying hamlet which provides literacy and sewing classes to poor uneducated women and children of this rural desert area.  We have a local tutor, Pooja Kanwar who has been trained internally through Sambhali by shadowing our Hindi and Sewing tutors in the Jodhpur Empowerment Centre.

Volunteers within the Setrawa Empowerment Centre, have provided outreach programmes to the families, teaching them about the water cycle and hygiene, whilst we have also had a many groups of volunteers and interns taking a keen interest in the lives of the women in this rural desert area; one group from the U.S who were studying health and nutrition at university spent 10 days looking at the health and nutrition of these women and teaching them the value of nutritious foods, which local foods have various nutrient components in them; as well as purifying water.

 

 

 

Manju Mehta with the Sheerni women
Manju Mehta with the Sheerni women
Sheerni women
Sheerni women
Rural district of Setrawa
Rural district of Setrawa
Pooja Kanwar, tutor at our new Centre
Pooja Kanwar, tutor at our new Centre
Hygiene class in Setrawa
Hygiene class in Setrawa

Attachments:
May 12, 2014

Sheerni Educational Project Update

Chinu
Chinu's 2 daughters Alfisa and Nosil

Sheerni Educational Project Update

 

In February, Vimlesh Solanki, one of our existing tutors who was teaching the children in our project at Balikah Grah, the government boarding home, was appointed to come to the boarding house to help support the girls with their Hindi and other subjects.  The volunteers help with English and Maths homework on a daily basis when they go to the boarding home for a couple of hours a day and Nirmala the housemother, now needs the assistance of a Hindi speaking tutor with the 20 girls.  A structure was established to do homework all together first, then have a group activity or task related to Maths/English and then they would all go to the park nearby for sports and games.  In March volunteers were taking dance and theater classes and the girls enjoyed these very much.

Gerti, one of the Sambhali volunteers who has returned for a second time, had put together some First Aid boxes with a lot of equipment in them and held a First Aid workshop for the girls and Nirmala. They now have a first aid box and knowledge about what to do in cases of injuries and burns.

In school, the Principal checked the notebooks and homework of the girls and most girls got good marks, but Samta and Vishnu had poor writing and were missing exercises; Rekha also has problems in school. Vimla, Santosh, Priyanka and Kaushalya spent some days in the village because of a wedding.
On 27 February Anne Vincent from the Global Foundation for Humanity visited the boarding house with two other guests to check on the progress of the girls.

In March the girls were preparing for exams.  The volunteers concentrated hard working with the girls in Maths.  All of the girls know written addition and subtraction now. Pankaj shows an ability to solve problems that even girls in class 4,(the class above her), have problems with.  Pankaj has shown to be very bright.

After January (the winter holiday) the girls behaved quite badly, which was beginning to disrupt the group, and so Mrs Manju Metha, Sambhali’s Project Co-ordinator and Mr. Virendra Singh explained to the girls how to behave,  and everything settled down again. They asked that all the staff and volunteers to spend half an hour every day, teaching the girls good behaviour.

Pankaj, Rekha and Vishnu are starting to read English. The girls reading in the 3rd Standard are reading English and are good at Maths. All of the girls have great results at school and have good grades. Asu is one of the best ones reading and drawing. Next year they will put her in 5th Standard class, instead of 4th because she is so good.  Samta is doing her best writing now.

All of the girls have received a follow-up session on Sambhali’s No Bad Touch Workshop by our Sambhali NBT Project team, regarding awareness about Child Sexual Abuse.  On 24 March all the girls had inoculation against hepatitis. The Boarding home have changed the arrangements and so now the girls eat downstairs on a long table, where they have more space.

In April, as the girls had their exams during this month, we did more studying and teaching with them than normal. While Vimlesh has been working a lot with the older girls, the volunteers took more care of the younger ones. Grade 3 and 4 had to learn different passages out of their books: some they had to be able to write, others they had to read well or know by heart.

Apart from this, there have been lessons when the older girls (starting from 5th grade) had been taught and repeated the tenses (with Vimlesh and a volunteer). In addition, Vimlesh taught them spelling of different words and checked if they could remember one day later. They also learned spelling in a game.

Anu was struggling with English, so we had some extra reading and writing lessons and we are encouraging her to speak English as much as possible so she can gain confidence in her abilities. Pushpa is struggling a lot. While she is able to say the necessary things in English, it is really difficult for her to write or read. She needs more help with English and she is motivated to learn. Rekha’s spoken English is good enough to be able to talk to her and have a conversation but needs more help from the volunteers to help her write English. Priya seems to do very well and understands fast, if she gets taught something new. Two girls had a lot of problems reading Hindi, so Vimlesh was helping them and taught them how to read with great success. She also taught them strategies how they can learn best.

Nirmala, the housemother, taught the girls how to pronounce the vowels and helped them in reading Hindi. She also assisted the older girls in social studies and environmental studies as well as in science and moral science. Nirmla explained to them the stories they have read in school and discussed the moral of it.

In Maths, Vimlesh has taught them fractions (how to add and subtract them). Also the smaller girls (1st to 4th grade) were taught how to multiply, divide, add and subtract. All of the girls had to learn tables and a competition was created to check who can learn them the fastest. A few girls were able to do them up to 20 easily. The older girls (6th to 8th grade) were taught areas and parameters of squares and rectangles. The same topics that Vimlesh has been teaching during the afternoon, Nirmla repeated after Vimlesh and the volunteers have left. She practised Addition and Subtraction with the girls.

Just a few days before the end of the month, two new girls joined the boarding home (Alfisa and Nosil). They adapted very well within a few days and seem to be well and comfortable. The other girls take good care of them.

 

 

Group photo with Nirmala
Group photo with Nirmala
Homework tutorial
Homework tutorial
Sangeeta
Sangeeta
Helping with homework
Helping with homework
Studying
Studying
skipping games
skipping games

donate now:

Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $15
    give
  • $30
    give
  • $85
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $115
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $250
    give
  • $300
    give
  • $15
    each month
    give
  • $30
    each month
    give
  • $85
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $115
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $250
    each month
    give
  • $300
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?