Karuna Trust

Our vision is of a world without prejudice, in which every human being has the opportunity to fulfil their potential, regardless of their background or beliefs. We aim to do this by challenging the ignorance and prejudice that trap people in poverty.
Jul 5, 2011

A rough deal for girls

Recent research by UNICEF verifies how girls in India face a rough deal when compared to boys. Here are some key findings from a recent uncef report - 


"Almost 47 percent of the girls in the age group of 11 to 19 years are underweight in India, which is the highest in the world," says the report which considered three criteria -health, nutrition and education - to comment on the state of adolescents globally.


“This is of concern as anemic girls being undernourished are the first to drop out of school and are married off early,” - Karin Hulsof of Unicef India.


“The adolescent birth rate also stands at 45 - the number of births per thousand women between the ages of 15 and 19 years,” according to the report titled ‘State of the World's Children 2011’.

“About 57 per cent of the poorest children in India are underweight compared to 20 per cent of the richest.”

Jun 27, 2011

Adolescence in India

I came across some insightful information on a UNICEF blog about adolescents in India. Here are some interesting facts from that blog:

* India has the highest adolescent population in the world

* It is still the case that boys enjoy a higher quality of adolescence than girls

* The biggest health problem for Indian female adolescents is Anemia - about 50% of girls aged between 15-19 in India are anemic. 

* The risk of HIV is significantly higher amongst adolescent females than adolescent males 

Karin Hulshof, UNICEF India Representative concluded that - 

The available data shows that maximum adolescence today, do not get to enjoy or have access to quality education, basic sexual reproductive health care, support for mental health issue and disability and protection from violence, abuse and exploitation and a forum for their participation. 

Links:

Jun 27, 2011

Big Changes

 Prakash, leader of the project in India, tells us about the biggest changes that he has seen during his time there:

 

Question: What are the biggest changes that you have seen during the years of being involved in the project?

 

Answer: 

 When we started our work we could see many  young children are with their mothers in the Bidi factories when she was rolling bidies.  Children sleep, eat, play in the tobacco atmosphere which was hazardous for their health.  Not only that but children were exposed to tobacco dust since they are in mother’s womb.  But due to continuous awareness and motivation now bidi rollers understands the dangers of tobacco and keep their children either in pre-school centres or at home, when they role bidies. 

Earlier when we used to asked mothers about future of their children, particularly girls, they use to say that she will roll bidies.  But if you ask any woman in NISD Project area  she will say that I don’t want to bring my daughter in this hazardous work i.e. bidi rolling. 

Earlier Money Lenders were very common in these villages.  They used to give loans ( on very high interest rates) to these women and exploiting them.  NISD started Self Help  Groups in these villages and now there are around 100 Self Help Groups in our project villages.  These SHGs now cater the loan need of these women and money lending system is abolished completely in NISD’s project villages. SHGs not only fulfilled monetary needs but also built their unity and solved number of social and other problems of women and children of these villages

 

With your continued support, we can carry on bringing about meaningful and lasting change.

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