Phoenix Fund

Our mission is to conserve the exceptionally rich fauna and flora of the Russian Far East, the only region where Amur tigers and leopards survive in the wild. These magnificent animals are threatened by habitat deterioration, poaching of the big cats themselves and depletion of their prey populations.
Jul 15, 2013

Anti-poaching activities in Zov Tigra

During the second quarter of 2013 the inspectors conducted 20 anti-poaching patrols and covered 2,801 km, including 502 km on foot, in order to reveal and prevent wildlife crimes in Zov Tigra National Park. As a result, three administrative citations were issued upon violators: one for camping outside of the designated campgrounds, one for violation of fire safety rules, and one for illegal presence in the protected area. Patrols were intensified on the North and South areas due to the start of the tourist season and revitalization of ginseng root gatherers.   

Within the past few years Zov Tigra National Park has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in Primorye, and as a result a large number of tourists flock to the protected area, and most of them prefer entering the Park without getting special permission at the Park’s visitor centre. For example, in May a senior lady was stopped in the Park and was issued a written warning for illegal entering the protected area. In June, a group of tourists was fined for setting up a campfire out of the fire pit area.

We are glad to report that the Park’s specialists found evidence indicating that the number of Amur tigers increased in the national park compared to previous year. It is worth mentioning that at the end of 2012 there was a drastic situation when wolf population began steadily growing within the Park. At least, a few litters of wolf pups were recorded. And there was a danger that wolves could completely destroy the ungulate population in the Park. Luckily, at the beginning of the year 2013 the Park’s employees noticed that the density of tiger tracks significantly increased on the North area of the Park indicating that more tigers appeared there; and as a result in winter the wolf population was displaced by tigers. According to images from camera traps installed in the Park, there are eight Amur tigers and approximately four cubs, all about one year and a half old, living there.

Besides patrolling, the inspectors also were involved in other activities. For example, in April, they cleared a fire break (11 km long between the Kovarny and Kamenka streams) from dry leaves and felled trees in order to prevent ignition there. Also, areas near the Central and Milogradovsky inspector’s stations were cleared from felled trees. Additional campgrounds were built in the Park.

“Generally speaking, a number of violations has decreased compared with the same period of time in 2012”, says Yuri Bersenev, director of the Zov Tigra National Park. “People have become aware of a high possibility of being caught and punished for their illegal activities here”. 

Apr 17, 2013

Best ranger serves the national park

We are glad to report that one of the best wildlife rangers of our region fights poaching in the Zov Tigra national park! In September 2012 during the celebration of annual Tiger Day festival in Vladivostok the names of the two Best Rangers of Primorsky province were announced following the result of the anti-poaching work in 2011-2012. For three years the Zov Tigra national park successfully implements law-enforcement monitoring program MIST which allows evaluating the performance of each anti-poaching inspector. This year two best wildlife rangers – Eugeny Terentyev state inspector of the Land of the Leopard national park and Sergei Marchenko state inspector of response team of Zov Tigra national park - were awarded with a trip to India. A visit to the fantastic tiger range country was sponsored by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

A few weeks ago Sergei return to his homeland and shared some impressions from the trip and tiger protection system in India with his colleagues. The program included visits to three tiger reserves, exchange of experience with Indian rangers and meetings with locals. During the travel Sergei saw a great number of wild animals walking freely around the protected territories and being under reliable protection of the Indian guards. He also mentioned that the protection system is arranged more effective there: camera-traps are placed everywhere, information is instantly transferred through satellite communication to the rangers’ computers. Without leaving a guard post Indian inspectors can see everything that happens in the reserved area. Locals treat the security guards with deep respect and rangers themselves never break the park rules.

Such an experience is very valuable for Russian state inspectors as they feel more appreciation of their effort to protect tiger. Also from seeing the new and different methods of patrol work they can introduce some improvements to the existing protection system of the parks and reserves here in Russia. 

Apr 15, 2013

Latest update on the rehab residents

In March Cinderella continued to hunt rather professionally. Her prey animals were deer and boars. The tigress is 18 months old now. At this age young tigers begin their independent life in the wild nature. The final phase in Cinderella’s hunting training is the search of a prey (deer) in the neighboring open-air enclosure. In spring white snow cover in the enclosure turned into a yellow blanket of last year’s fallen leaves with gray brushwood and bushes. In this landscape Cinderella became hardly noticeable and changed her behavior. She worries less and is ok with people’s presence in the center as the tigress can hide in her enclosure really well.

The three tiger cubs spend most of the daytime in their wooden lodge (8 x 4) where they were kept initially before the release to the quarantine open-air enclosure. Now they leave the lodge only in the morning and evening twilight – during their activity peak. After Cinderella’s release back into the wild the cubs will occupy her enclosures, both rehabilitation and hunting ones.

The fifth tiger cub Ustin is living in the spacious reserve open-air enclosure where there are two dens and other conditions for successful rehabilitation.

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