Krishi Avam Paristhitiki Vikas Sansthan (KRAPAVIS)

KRAPAVIS is a grass-roots organization concerned chiefly with the community-led revival of village forests, or orans, working in the arid of Thar Desert and semi - arid of Aravali hill bio-regions in Rajasthan. KRAPAVIS mission is clear: the betterment of ecology, agriculture and livestock practices, with a view to the sustainable livelihoods of rural pastoral communities in Rajasthan.
Aug 26, 2014

Listening to the Sounds of the Forest

My guides as we walk through a restored land
My guides as we walk through a restored land

The following is a postcard from Neeharika Tummala, GlobalGiving's In-the-Field Representative in India and Bangladesh, about her recent visit to Krishi Avam Paristhitiki Vikas Sansthan (KRAPAVIS).

Of the 50 odd organizations I have visited, KRAPAVIS has a unique mandate of community development. They closely understand the relationship of people to the environment and how preserving one can benefit the other. Like millions of people in rural India, people are dependent on agriculture and raising cattle. But with lack of understanding and neglect, several grazing lands are being eroded and spoilt. As a result, birds don’t nest there, animals leave and biodiversity decreases. KRAPAVIS showed me that the damage is not permanent and with effort, grazing lands can be restored. I visited several such restored sites and my guides were two local KRAPAVIS ladies who have now become informal biodiversity experts! They showed me the nursery, where new plants are grown and then sold at nominal prices, taught me the names of certain plants and even showed me how to protect ants. No species is ignored! In one of the restored areas, I was told that tigers come at night to drink water, something that did not happen before and a great sign of conservation success. Conservation includes things like building bunds so that rainwater is conserved and available for community use.

The founder Aman would walk me through a site and would say ‘can you hear that?’ and I would say ‘what?’ and he said ‘the sound of birds chirping!’ I took these sounds for granted but realized what a disturbing world it would be if I woke up to hear silence instead of birds in the air.

The impact of restoring these grazing lands is that cattle have food and access to water which provides herders with increased access to milk and therefore income. One of the best examples of sustainable development that I have seen!   

The Nursery
The Nursery
Protecting the Ants
Protecting the Ants
A community member who stops to say hi
A community member who stops to say hi
Walking on one of the rainwater harvesting bunds
Walking on one of the rainwater harvesting bunds
Women collecting water for cooking and drinking
Women collecting water for cooking and drinking
Jul 7, 2014

Johad in Oran: Traditional Rainwater Harvesting

Under construction of a rain water harvesting
Under construction of a rain water harvesting

During the reporting period, ‘Johad’, a traditional rainwater harvesting structure has been built in ‘Oran’ sacred forest of Binak village, located in Sariska Tiger Reserve of Rajasthan (India). Intervention in a Oran depends upon its topography and villagers’ consensus. Also the amount of rainfall has been an important deciding factor. KRAPAVIS, the project organization follows a holistic approach of conserving flora and fauna in Oran, making livelihood sustainable for pastoralist communities of Binak village. Oran protects watershed and is of utmost importance as vital source of water. 'Johad' in Oran in turn stop soil erosion, recharged groundwater, nurtured vegetation in orans, and provided grazing and resting places for wild and domesticated animals.

Ecological Traditions of India, Rajasthan
Ecological Traditions of India, Rajasthan
Apr 4, 2014

Restoring sacred grove strengthens ethnoveterinary

Preparation for growing medicinal plants
Preparation for growing medicinal plants

Restoring sacred groves strengthens ethno-veterinary practices

 In the project area of Rajasthan (India), the major livelihood of rural communities is rearing livestock and followed by agriculture. Due to lack of animal health care facilities in rural communities, people depend on locally available medicinal plants. Thus the project communities are engaged in restoring their sacred groves, which locally known as Orans. These Orans are also good micro biodiversity reserves; more importantly are good refuge for wildlife in an otherwise densely populated landscape. The people depend on these lands to procure access food, fodder and medicinal plants. In many cases, they are used for community gatherings during festivals.

 In an in-depth investigation on medicinal plants in Orans, revealed that about 37 species of plants belonging to 32 genera under 24 families have been noticed which they use for veterinary health care. A total of 27 healers and herbal practitioners were interviewed during the study. Total of 47 remedies were recorded for 19 veterinary disease conditions of which 21 remedies were recorded under digestive disorders. Precisely, this project “Restoring sacred groves” strengthens the ethno-veterinary practices.


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