The Coral Reef Alliance

Healthy coral reefs are some of the most diverse and valuable ecosystems on the planet. Nearly a billion people live near coral reefs, with many relying on reefs for food, coastal protection from storms and erosion, and income from fishing, recreation, and tourism*. At a global scale, coral reefs have enormous intrinsic value as the ocean's richest biodiversity hotspot. In addition, coral reef biodiversity is increasingly becoming a primary source for the biological compounds used to develop new medicines. Yet coral reefs also represent one of the most imperiled biomes on the planet. An estimated 60 percent of the world's reefs are under immediate and direct threat from local activities suc...
Jan 7, 2014

CORAL's New Water Use Guide in Circulation

CORAL
CORAL's Hawaii Water Guide

“Hotel X” could save between $137,000 and $147,000 on its water bill each year by using recycled water while at the same time helping preserve Maui’s coral reefs, according to the results of a water-use survey CORAL conducted recently. The survey was part of our campaign to assist hotel and condominium property managers as they prepare to access recycled (“R1”) water from the County of Maui’s new purple pipes; using recycled wastewater for landscaping and other purposes will reduce the amount of treated wastewater that ultimately reaches the reefs. The water-use survey results, plus tips for connecting to the recycled water system and navigating the permit process, were just published by CORAL in Recycled Water for Reefs/A Guide for West Maui’s Resorts and Condominium Properties (downloadable at www.coral.org/hawaiiwater). The guide also includes information about using recycled water for landscaping, as well as how to get involved in the broader watershed stewardship movement, the West Maui Ridge to Reef Initiative, of which CORAL is a partner.

The County of Maui’s Steve Parabicoli says he’s excited to see Maui moving forward with recycled water use, not only for the benefits to reefs, but also because it will help extend Maui’s limited supply of potable water. “I’ve seen the need for years. We’ve looked at this as a wastewater disposal issue, but it should also be looked at as a drought-proof water supply issue.”

Lisa Paulson, Executive Director of the Maui Hotel & Lodging Association, says she sees recycled water use directly benefiting both reefs and the local economy. “Our reefs are integral to everybody’s visit. I would say ninety percent of the visitors who come here are in the ocean. We all realize that if we don’t maintain our island, we’re going to lose the main reason people come to visit us.” 

Thanks so much for your support of our clean water work in Hawaii--and best "fishes" for a wonderful New Year!

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Oct 18, 2013

News from the Reef--Indonesia

Fish on the way to market
Fish on the way to market

The biggest surprise for former CORAL Conservation Programs Director Rick MacPherson on his spring reef surveys off the north coast of Bali was that the nearshore reefs—which he expected to be teeming with life, “like the ‘Times Square’ of the Coral Triangle”—were instead very quiet. “Gone were the colorful reef fish grazing on algae on the coral rock, along with the usual underwater chorus of snaps and pops from their nibbling,” he recalls. The magnificent predator fish were gone too: no sharks, jack, snapper, or grouper.

Where he did find lots of fish, however, was displayed in front of the beach-long strip of restaurants in the village of Jimbaran just outside the Bali capital of Denpasar. There, hundreds of tourists were disembarking from tour buses and engaging in a feeding frenzy, selecting their favorite reef fish for dinner. Lobster and crab were on display as well. All of these fish and crustaceans play important ecological roles in keeping reefs healthy, so the fact that they were onshore, rather than on the reef, was disturbing. “The sheer volume surprised me,” says Rick. “I saw more grouper for sale on the beach than in one week of reef surveys.”

In nearby Amed, Reef Check Indonesia has worked for several years to discourage the practice of unsustainable reef fishing, while CORAL has complemented their efforts by building community support for a voluntary user fee system that would bring alternative income into the community through dive tourism. We have also been encouraging the community to take more ownership of their reef. In some other communities along the northern coast, locals have asserted their own access rights, establishing a “turf.” When poachers come in, they are chased out. In contrast to what he saw at Jimbaran, says Rick, those local “rights-based” fishery areas had visibly more abundant and intact fish communities. “It’s still obviously depleted, but you can see the recovery taking place.”

CORAL hopes that by building support from within communities like Amed, we can inspire replication of this kind of rights-based approach. At the same time, we plan to work with legislators and policymakers at the regency (local) or federal level to reinforce this type of ownership through legal decrees. Such a solution speaks to what CORAL is all about: bringing people—tourism operators, fishermen, NGO partners, government officials—together to reestablish healthy reefs.

Amed dive tag generates money for conservation
Amed dive tag generates money for conservation
Jul 31, 2013

Honduras Embraces Its Reefs

CORAL staff documenting the beautiful reefs
CORAL staff documenting the beautiful reefs

In Honduras, the groundswell of interest in conserving coral reefs continues. CORAL’s Field Manager Jenny Myton recently appeared on “Frente a Frente,” the most viewed show on national television, to talk about Cordelia Banks, CORAL’s voluntary standards for sustainable marine tourism, CORAL and partners’ responsible seafood guide, and why reefs are important to every Honduran. Since her appearance on the show, she has been inundated with calls, including from government representatives.

“The most important comments I’ve received are people telling me, ‘I now know why the reefs are so important’ or ‘I didn’t know you shouldn’t eat shark and turtle,’” says Jenny. “Now they know they have alternatives and can make better choices.”

Jenny also led a scuba and sustainable marine recreation training for Tela’s municipal and federal government officials and a local NGO, Prolansate, at the request of the Mayor of Tela, who is interested in having the coral reefs of Capiro Banks declared a Site of Wildlife Importance before the end of the year. To that end, CORAL and the Healthy Reefs Initiative recently assessed the reef using the Atlantic Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment standard protocols to verify and delineate its extent and condition—and to provide the necessary documentation and basis for designating the reef a Site of Wildlife Importance.

Jenny conducting a workshop for govt officials
Jenny conducting a workshop for govt officials
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