Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon

To improve the welfare and reduce the population of feral and stray cats through spay/neuter programs and education.
May 14, 2015

Alumni Tails: Neutering Changed Blackie

Blackie
Blackie

Blackie found a wonderful caregiver in Helen L.. She sent us this current photo of him, looking healthy and fluffy. He had a very different appearance and demeanor when she first met him, but in the year since he was neutered at FCCO last July he changed. Neutering can significantly reduce behaviors associated with mating such as territorial fights with other cats and constant nightly yowling to attract fertile females. 

Helen describes Blackie:

Blackie progressed from a very wild kitty to a well-fed handsome boy. I used to feed him near the bushes where he hid. Today Blackie is friendly and very loyal to his people, who include me and my husband and another couple two houses north of us. He takes walks with us around the block or to the park and communicates affection in many ways. His regal manner is always on display: the fluffy mane, the ears swiveling back at an attractive angle, the tail carried high with big curl at the end. He accepts petting and brushing and makes brief entrances indoors for a look-see-sniff. My cat HollyBear gets along with him because he defers to her.
 
Blackie is a true success story for FCCO!
Feb 13, 2015

29 Cats from One Colony Now Spayed/Neutered!

Caregiver Mel "pre-baiting" traps for his colony
Caregiver Mel "pre-baiting" traps for his colony
     Brad J. is the neighbor of feral cat caregivers Mel and Judy J. They live across the street from each other in Scappoose, Oregon. Brad sees Mel and Judy feeding cats every morning. At first there weren't that many but now it seems like cats are everywhere. 
     Then Brad realized that Mel and Judy, both disabled seniors, have at times gone without food themselves so they could feed the cats. They have even had their utilities shut off. 
     Realizing that something needed to be done, Brad talked with Mel and Judy about spaying/neutering and how trap-neuter-return (TNR) works and even generously offered to do all the trapping and transporting. Then Brad called FCCO, made arrangements to get traps, and scheduled appointments for all their cats this week. Their first effort trapping resulted in 24 cats and the next day they had 5 more! With all those cats trapped it was easy for Mel and Judy to keep an eye out for others. Only one cat remained to be trapped and they are working hard right now to do so.
      The cats are feral but loved by Mel and Judy. They have many places to seek shelter including little houses for the cats to sleep in. Now that they were spayed/neutered and vaccinated this week they will be healthy but no longer producing more mouths to feed. Mel and Judy will finally feel like they have control of the situation.
     Because Mel and Judy didn't have anything to contribute for the cats' medical expenses, we had supporters step up and cover the care for all of the cats in this colony. It also warms our hearts knowing that Brad put so much effort into making so many lives better - Mel and Judy's, as well as all of the cats. Caring for feral and stray cats, often called community cats, is truly a team effort.
     Thank you for caring about the cats!
24 of the colony
24 of the colony's cats in traps awaiting surgery
One of the cats after surgery showing his eartip
One of the cats after surgery showing his eartip
Releasing (all came back for food the next day)
Releasing (all came back for food the next day)
Back home, now neutered and vaccinated
Back home, now neutered and vaccinated

Links:

Nov 18, 2014

Alumni Tails: Tux's Story

Tux - before and after his visit to FCCO
Tux - before and after his visit to FCCO

Rachel N. sent these 'before and after' photos of her formerly-feral cat "Tux" along with this update:

He was much scrawnier when we first met him; he's filled out a bit now... he eats like there's no tomorrow. We were feeding him outside for about a year before we brought him into FCCO, and during his recovery from his surgery we let him stay in the garage - which he LOVED. He was super lovey and wanted to sit on my lap almost immediately. Those few recovery days turned into slowly letting him in the house from time to time... and now he thinks he owns the place! He's been such a friendly cat we decided he could be a permanent resident. 

We have helped over 70,000 feral and stray cats and receives all funding from donors like you. Your support means a great deal to FCCO and the cats and caregivers like Tux and Rachel who we help. Thank you!

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