PATHWAYS Leadership for Progress

PATHWAYS mission is develop leaders in developing countries through university scholarships and direct involvement in and oversight of community development projects.
Feb 4, 2014

February 2014 Report

David counseling dental patients
David counseling dental patients

8th Report February 2014

 

Dear Friends,

We have done 2 more dental camps since November 2013. We served over 100 attendees, whose issues ranged from impacted teeth to dental caries. As you know, I fund these free community dental clinics, in part from the funds I raise in my reduced cost neighborhood clinics.

I recently acquired a prime location for a new reduced cost neighborhood dental clinic and I intend to have the clinic running by mid next month. Many persons who would not otherwise have access to dental care are served at these clinics. The first clinic I opened in a low income neighborhood, the Mihango Clinic, is doing all fine and we are seeing numbers going up. Currently, we now see about 80 patients every month. In Kenya there has recently been a change in the government healthcare system. We are now under the new county government system unlike previously where we were employees of the national (central) government. The new system has a lot of issues to be dealt with that’s why I have chosen to study Health Care Management and Health Economics. With this knowledge I hope to improve dental and medical services for the poor in Kenya.

Thank you for your continued support of Dentcare Kenya.

 

Have a blessed day,

David

Dental care volunteers examining patients
Dental care volunteers examining patients

Links:

Jan 30, 2014

February 2014 Report

Mr. Muchoki in maize field-note dying maize
Mr. Muchoki in maize field-note dying maize

February, 2014

 

Maragua Division, Kenya

 

Dear Friends,

It is yet another frustrating season to the Kenyan farmer. The season started well with farmers planting crops as rains began to fall in October last year. However, the rains subsided two months later in December. A maize/corn crop requires five months of rainfall to mature. This pre-dominant staple food has already began to wither and die off prematurely while in the field. County governments across Kenya have started issuing famine alerts such as “Food security among an estimated 45 percent of the population of the southeastern and coastal marginal agricultural livelihood zones will remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) during the post-harvest period due to a far below average short rains harvest and its effects on agricultural labor and staple food markets.” However, farmers in our cassava project catchment area are cushioned from total losses.

In the photos is a local farmer, Mr. Francis Muchoki inspecting his drying maize crop. He is again seen admiring his cassava crop which has been able to withstand the drought conditions. He says, " I have learnt a lesson. I will henceforth do cassava cultivation only."

Thank you for your continued support to help us achieve food security and to spread the word about the benefits of cassava.

All the best.

 

Michael

Mr. Muchoki in cassava field-note healthy cassava
Mr. Muchoki in cassava field-note healthy cassava

Links:

Dec 6, 2013

December 2013 report

Community group with their goats
Community group with their goats

December, 2013

 

Dear Friends,

Thank you so much for supporting Jemimah, Dennis, and Michael.  Dennis and Michael are graduating today (December 6, 2013) from the University of Nairobi.  We are very proud of all they have accomplished both academically and with their community projects.  I want to introduce Hussein, a third year PATHWAYS scholar majoring in actuarial science.  His project is to alleviate poverty in his community by providing community members with a goat.  Please see his report below.

It is now a year and a month since this project has commenced, and here is a brief write up on what has been going on:

We were glad to meet with most of the beneficiaries during our field visit; all being very well and sound. We were also glad to meet the goats too; all hale and hearty, living quite felicitously under the caring arms of 18 devoted women and 2 strong men.

The goat number now stands at 23, with 12 adults and 11 kids. The number of kids born since the initialization of the project is actually 14, but 3 have passed away, as indicated in our previous quarterly reports, for one reason or another. In the past one year each of the 10 female goats we supplied initially has given birth to at least one goat, others blessedly two.

We gathered from the beneficiaries a few vital and very critical facts: One, it would take a goat about 5 to 6 months after giving birth before it conceived once again. The second bit of truism we gathered was that it would take about 6 to 7 months before a dependent kid became permanently and self-sustainably detached from its mother. This piece of statistic will by all odds come in handy in our future planning and execution of our assumed mandate to distribute to as many families as possibleógoats that will aid poor folk here or there and in one way or another, as we battle to outdo and chase away poverty from our midst.

Thankfully there have been only a few cases of goats ailing. In the past 4 months there have been zero complaints. In the past one year, about 4 remotely-mentioned cases, three of which were the concern to one particular goat. This goat is under the custodianship of Mama Nyakondo and her project partner Bwana.

My group keeps encouraging Mama Nyakondo to keep her custodianship to her goat who is sickly plus her faith to it, and to still get involved in the project. By the end of this first phase of our program we plan to come up with the appropriate ways to indemnify her.

Talking about end of phase, I want to report here that as a group, we have resolved to take back from the beneficiaries, the parent-goat stock by early June, or latest August 2014. Our projection is that by this time each of the initial (parent) goats would have a minimum of two birthed kids. These kids will remain irredeemably under the ownership of the respective beneficiaries, to carry forward this whole business of goat-keeping. Our primary goal as a group is to alleviate poverty, and we are working to train and influence the villagers to work through the rest of the stages of this initiated program in line with this aspiration.

 

Future Plans With The Program

We have a vision as a group to see this program grow and turn into an excellent, helpful social businessóin line with the model of business proposed by Muhammad Yunus , founder and Managing Director of the Grameen Bank in Dhaka, Bangladesh and also the recipient of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize.

 

Report written by Hussein Said, Project-Manager-Nguuni Youth Group.

Project sponsored by Pathways Leadership for Progress

Beneficiary with her goats
Beneficiary with her goats

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