PATHWAYS Leadership for Progress

PATHWAYS mission is develop leaders in developing countries through university scholarships and direct involvement in and oversight of community development projects.
Aug 12, 2013

August 2013 report

Girl beneficiary sharing with another girl
Girl beneficiary sharing with another girl

August 2013

Nairobi Kenya

Dear Global Giving Friends,

The girls who have passed through the program have continued to inspire others in their communities in a great way.  The more exciting bit is the multiplier effect because peer mentorship seems to be gaining momentum even faster than what we thought when we conceived the project.  Our visit to Meru community where Caroline, our project officer and beneficiary of the project comes from revealed that already 18 girls have formed a group where they meet to have talks on business and careers (some are students others have just completed high school and want to venture in business). They are then facilitating girls seminars at the church under their group theme "Mentor a Girl, save the Nation".  I attended part of their seminar on July 21st 2013 and impressed by the talks the girls had organized. they concluded the seminar with a drama titled 'The journey from Ignorance to Empowerment" where they showed how a girl (caroline) chosen from the village to participate in the intensive SAWA mentorship program has 'opened' their eyes and empowered them.  The parents, most of them mothers requested SAWA to consider training at least two more girls for greater impacts.

So far we have had 15 girls graduate from the program and many more have benefited from the direct mentorship of each of the girls trained by SAWA.

With my sincere gratitude for your support in this effort to improve the opportunities for young girls,

Catherine Kaimenyi

Project Leader

Catherine talking with girl beneficiary
Catherine talking with girl beneficiary

Links:

Aug 7, 2013

August 2013 report

Researchers visiting our cassava project
Researchers visiting our cassava project

August, 2013

Maragua Division, Kenya

Dear Friends,

One of the major causes of hunger in Kenya is the over-reliance on corn and beans as the staple foods. These are crops that cannot withstand adverse weather conditions such as drought. Our community has however successfully adopted cassava to enhance food security. The good news has spread far and wide. We recently hosted a group of researchers from the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute who wanted to know the impact that cassava has had on the food security status of our community. We showed them around and gave them a presentation on our work as well. We hope that they can learn from our experience and initiate a national program on cassava cultivation.
The attached photo shows a community member explaining how she has benefited from the crop. In front of her are young cassava tubers.

Having already left the university, I am back in the village where I am volunteering in the planning of my county's (Murang'a County) Agricultural Show, next month.

Thank you for your continued support to help us achieve food security and to spread the word about the benefits of cassava.

Michael

Community giving a presentation on our project
Community giving a presentation on our project
Aug 2, 2013

August 2013 report

David giving exam to patient
David giving exam to patient

6th Report

Nairobi Kenya

 

Dear Friends,

We are so happy to report the overall success of our new nonprofit, DentCare Kenya, and also the individual

success stories of those who we have had the privilege to serve. In addition to focusing on teeth, we also provide information to individuals on their overall health. I would like to share with you the

personal stories of some of the beneficiaries of our free dental services.  Please read below the stories of

Raymond, James, Sylvester and Peninah.

 

Raymond Mutinda

 

Raymond suffered from gum disease which is an infection in the gum tissues and bone that has

been linked to heart disease and strokes. He is also diabetic

so this contributed to the disease as it makes teeth more susceptible as it reduces the body’s

resistance to infections. Further, high glucose levels promote the growth of bacteria. He was

treated and advised to take proper care of his teeth especially owing to his vulnerability from the

diabetes. He was also advised to be keen in maintaining control over his blood sugar.

 

James Omoke

 

I had gone to see another dentist and I was advised to have a root canal treatment for my molar

tooth. I did not get much information from the doctor and so when I saw the camp going on at

Kenyatta National Hospital, I decided to attend. I wanted to know what a root canal was. I was

informed that human teeth may have one to four (1-4) root canals, depending on the anatomy of

the tooth. Molars may have 2 to 4 canals. The doctor went ahead to say that these canals contain

the pulp of the tooth also commonly referred to as the nerve, which originates from the pulp

chamber. Any trauma or infection of the nerve will result in the need for root canal therapy. I got

to know of the common reasons for root canal therapy which include:

 

Tooth decay invading the tooth, penetrating through the enamel and then the dentin into the pulp.

A tooth has become abscessed or infected from decay.

Trauma from a chipped or broken tooth that results in the exposure of the nerve.

A tooth that is slowly dying, due to aging or past trauma that did not result in the need for

treatment at the time of injury.

 

I was informed that root canal therapy can be performed in a single or multiple visits. The

doctors started me on antibiotics as I had an infection. I was advised to complete the dosage

before the root canal treatment could be commenced. I hope to go back to the dentist’s again to

have the treatment completed.

 

Sylvester Mbugua

 

I have been having oral ulcers every month. They come and after about two weeks they heal.

It is really frustrating and that’s why I decided to come to the dentist when I heard of the free

dental camp. The dentist told me that my condition is known as recurrent oral ulcers. The ulcers

are small, round or oval shaped and they have a pale yellow color to them and the surrounding

area will be swollen and red. They are associated with a lot of pain and even eating becomes a

gruesome activity. I was advised to use some oral ointment that will relieve the pain and promote

faster healing. At the same time I was asked to have my blood checked for any conditions that

could be associated the oral ulcers. I just hope that I will find relief and I will have this problem

solved.

 

Peninah Amolo

 

My little girl, Teresa Achieng, 11years old, has her teeth growing badly. The milk teeth would

not loosen enough to be removed and the next set of permanent teeth were already showing. I

was told by a friend about Dentcare Kenya and I attended their free medical camp. My daughter

was assessed and treated. Two of her lower ‘milk’ teeth were extracted. The dentists said that

her teeth had really long roots and that is why she had that problem. Thank you Dentcare for that

help. I look forward to attending more of your medical camps.

 

We are very grateful to you for supporting us in our efforts to improve the oral health care of the needy in Kenya.

You are making a huge difference!

 

With gratitude,

David

Free clinic serving patients
Free clinic serving patients

Links:

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