Oregon Humane Society

To foster an environment of respect, responsibility, and compassion for all animals through education, legislation, and leadership. To care for the homeless, to defend the abused, and to fight with unrelenting diligence for recognition of the integrity of all animals.
Sep 9, 2013

Jail time for animal neglect

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An Estacada woman whose emaciated horses were seized by the Oregon Humane Society has been sentenced to 16 days in jail for animal neglect.

The ten rescued horses, many of them underweight by several hundred pounds and one with a halter embedded in its skin, were seized in March 2012 by OHS and Clackamas County sheriff’s deputies from a rural property on SE Randall Road in Estacada. Read the story here. The horses were seized under a search warrant signed by a Clackamas County Judge after efforts to persuade the owner to provide needed food and medical care were unsuccessful.

“We’re pleased to see this long legal battle come to end with a jail sentence for the offender and the horses regaining their health,” said OHS Executive Director Sharon Harmon. “In Oregon, letting your horse starve and suffer is against the law.”

Sentencing Includes Jail Time for Convicted Offender

The owner of the horses, Edith Mae Karlin, 65, was convicted last month of eight counts of second-degree animal neglect. She was sentenced on Aug. 2 in Clackamas County Circuit Court to 48 hours of jail time for each count of neglect (a total of 16 days), plus 60 months of supervised probation on each count. Monetary restitution is to be determined later. Karlin was also barred from owning horses or livestock for five years.

Clackamas County Deputy District Attorney Rose Gibson successfully argued that each neglected horse was a separate victim of neglect and that consecutive penalties for each conviction were warranted.

Since the 10 horses were seized last year, seven have been adopted, one was humanely euthanized because of unresolvable health issues, and two more horses are still seeking homes.

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Jun 7, 2013

Stranded Dog Rescued

OHSTAR members hiking in to the remote location
OHSTAR members hiking in to the remote location

The OHS Technical Animal Rescue Team (OHSTAR) responded to the call for assistance from the Clackamas County Sheriff at approximately 5:30 pm. JD had been on the river with his owners when he was swept away by the current below the site of the old Marmot Dam. The dog found refuge on the steep shore and then scrambled up to an otherwise-inaccessible rocky shelf about 20 feet above the water.

OHSTAR members hiked 30 minutes to get within sight of where JD was last seen. Team member Jennifer Stangel then rappelled down approximately 50 feet to the rocky shelf. After locating the shy dog, she used cheese treats to gain his confidence. Stangel was able to fit JD with a safety harness and rope. Her fellow OHSTAR members then raised JD to safety as darkness fell.

OHSTAR members train throughout the year to help animals who are stranded and need human help to survive. They have rescued pets stranded on cliffsides, riverbanks, and other areas and structures that can only be accessed safely using ropes, climbing equipment and other technical rescue equipment. This work is supported entirely by donations to OHS.

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May 3, 2013

Rescue Alert

The latest chapter of a year-long animal rescue saga came to pass today as the Oregon Humane Society removed 10 shar-peis from a Goldendale, Wash., resident who pleaded guilty last month to animal cruelty charges.

In May of 2012, OHS rescued 41 shar-peis, nearly all of them in need of medical treatment, from Goldendale, Wash., resident Eric Calvin. The evidence presented by OHS to the Klickitat County prosecutor was essential in reaching last month’s plea agreement.

Calvin pleaded guilty on April 15 to one felony count of animal cruelty and was sentenced to five years of probation and must pay $2,378 in fines and fees. Under the agreement, he must not possess any dogs other than two altered shar-peis.

Many of the 10 shar-peis taken today by OHS will require treatment for skin infections and entropion, an eye condition. They will be offered for adoption as soon as they are healthy enough for new homes.

The dogs rescued by OHS last year suffered from eye, skin and ear infections and required extensive medical treatment at OHS. With the help of local adopters and shar-pei rescue groups across the region, the final rescued shar-pei was adopted on Oct. 24, approximately six months after the rescue took place.

Although OHS Humane Officers do not have jurisdiction in Washington, the OHS shelter in Portland was the only facility in the Northwest with the resources to care for such a large number of neglected dogs. The medical team at OHS provided evidence to Klickitat County authorities that resulted in Calvin being charged with nine counts of animal cruelty.

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