Blue Planet Network

Our mission is to exponentially increase the impact of safe drinking water programs for people around the world. Beyond health, accessing clean drinking water is the critical first step for communities to rise out of poverty, to gain education, and to ensure economic and political stability. Our goal is to enable safe drinking water for 200,000,000 people in the next 20 years and we need your help.
Feb 27, 2013

Update: Blue Planet Network members operating in East Africa

GWWI in Moyo - Many hands make quick work
GWWI in Moyo - Many hands make quick work

Thank you so much for believing in Blue Planet Network. Your donation directly funds the water projects of our NGO members. Blue Planet Network connects donors and local communities to peer reviewed and vetted NGO member water projects. Our NGO members manage, track, monitor, and share the progress of their water projects on our online platform and those results are shared with you- the movers and shakers of the activist community! This level of collaboration and result sharing is our most effective means of providing scalable and sustainable safe drinking water and sanitation to the 780 million people around the world that are still in need.

Here we would like to take a moment of your time and present two NGO members whose programs and visibility are supported by Blue Planet Network.

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Spotlight on:

Global Women's Water Initiative & Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled

Blue Planet Network members

Global Women's Water Initiative, fondly known as GWWI, is an astounding example of a Blue Planet Network member that is changing the world - one woman at a time. Since 2008, GWWI has supported women leaders in implementing water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions worldwide and has coordinated three impressive Women and Water Trainings that brought together 100 women from 11 countries in Africa and the United States. Participants left these programs equipped with all the skills necessary to successfully launch their own water service project from start to finish.

The photographs below, taken just 2 months ago, capture the community of Moyo, Uganda, building a rainwater-harvesting tank from the ground up. Graduates of GWWI's year-long training program lead the way and trained the villagers to do everything; from site planning and design, to mixing mortar and making bricks, to proudly laboring over the finishing details. Also included is routine need assessments, capacity training for residents and strategic networking that ensures environmental and financial sustainability. Here we see examples of how team work and determination form the bedrock of success. Teamwork in Moyo is not a tool, it's a way of life. 

Tanzania Mission to the Poor and Disabled, otherwise known as PADI, is one of Blue Planet Network's founding members. PADI began its work in 1999 operating in the Ruvuma Region of Tanzania, before expanding to the 21 regions that make up the country. The organization is undertaking essential development activities such as safe water programs, malaria control, entrepreneurship skills training, agricultural and small business loans, and bringing awareness to the vulnerable groups, such as the elderly, orphaned, disabled, and poor. Like GWWI, sustainability plans and local know-how rank high.

The photos below make us feel as if we are invited to follow the students of St. Gertrude Primary School back to campus after gathering water from the closest pond, two miles away round trip. The water will to be used for baths and the evening meal. St. Gertrude is situated in the village of Ndelenyuma nestled in the Tanzanian highlands, 200km outside the nearest city of Songea. While the school provides what it can for the children, all 450 students take turns making the arduous trip for water two to three times a day. Indisputably, it is a proposed location for PADI to build a well. A sustainable water source will surely bring a look of relief to these children's faces. This clean and convenient water source will afford them the basic privileges they deserve. Soon they will be able to devote more time and energy to learning and the things they love most.

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As always, Blue Planet Network will continue to keep you informed on our members work and the expanding services we offer to enhance water and sanitation programs worldwide. And mark your calendars for March 22nd, the 20th anniversary of World Water Day! If you are moved to participate further, an easy place to start is by simply sharing this page with a few friends, family members or colleagues. Thank you for making this all possible!

GWWI in Moyo- How to carry 5 gallons of water
GWWI in Moyo- How to carry 5 gallons of water
GWWI in Moyo - leveling each brick and each layer
GWWI in Moyo - leveling each brick and each layer
GWWI in Moyo- Metal wiring is applied for support
GWWI in Moyo- Metal wiring is applied for support
PADI/St. Gertrude- Filling up at the watering hole
PADI/St. Gertrude- Filling up at the watering hole
PADI/St. Gertrude - the walk with full buckets
PADI/St. Gertrude - the walk with full buckets
PADI/St. Gertrude- Challenging each other
PADI/St. Gertrude- Challenging each other

Links:

Nov 23, 2012

Update: Women and Water in California

Photos taken by Sara Cozolino on November 1, 2012
Photos taken by Sara Cozolino on November 1, 2012

When you look at the facts, what women stand to gain from access to safe drinking water is priceless - to themselves, their families and the world economy at large. Did you know that worldwide, it is estimated that on a single day women can spend over 200 billion collective hours fetching water? And yes, you guessed it, if they are lugging water, they certainly aren't tending to their families and they aren't in school or running businesses. 

But the fact that isn't as often profiled is that women aren't just the benefactors of clean water and sanitation, they are leaders that enable it rise to community discussion and action.

I'll take a moment here to talk about Community Water Center, a Blue Planet Network member, that is a prime example of the courageous work being done by women for woman.

Community Water Center (CWC) operating in San Joaquin Valley, California is bringing the public's attention to just how much work needs to be done in small towns, like Seville, CA, where the tap water system is laden with pesticides, nitrates from animal waste, and chemical fertilizers due to the heavy agricultural climate. The tap water is undrinkable and families resort to buying expensive bottle water - double the cost of tap water! Imagine needing bottled water to bathe, to wash clothes, to brush teeth? One might be tempted to drink from the tap once in a while to save a quick buck or some time otherwise spent lugging water jugs, however the negative health effects, such as thyroid disease, are just too risky.

Founded and directed by women, Community Water Center works to help families, such as Bertha Diaz's family of three women, featured here.  

Bertha Diaz, 43, discusses her frustrations with Abigail Solis of CWC regarding the water contamination in her home in East Orosi, CA, while her daughters Maribel Sanchez, 24, and Jessica Sanchez, 19, look on. The need for clean water is an emergency to Bertha, who has a spinal cord injury. She works long hours picking oranges in fields nearby, carrying buckets full of the fruit, which hurts her back. In addition, every 3 days she has to buy jugs of Sparkletts water and carry them, which adds to the pain. Her feelings on the need for clean water were clear when she stated (via translator), “When I go to any important meeting and speak to people of power and they ignore me because they feel my situation isn’t an emergency, to me it’s like a person being ignored when they go to the emergency room because the hospital doesn’t think it’s that bad and the person ends up dying because they were ignored.” Photos taken by Sara Cozolino on November 1, 2012

The bottom line here: with your donation you have enabled powerful Blue Planet Network members, just like Community Water Center, to do more than they could ever dream of doing alone.

And the pleasant dream of my neighbors drinking tap water without fear, just like I am privledged to do, is one dream I personally would like to make reality.

Thank you so much.

Photos taken by Sara Cozolino on November 1, 2012
Photos taken by Sara Cozolino on November 1, 2012

Links:

Aug 10, 2012

Real Stories of Women & Young Girls Benefitting from Safe Water

Eisha Shaban - Tanzania
Eisha Shaban - Tanzania

We are delighted to share with you some of the personal stories and reports of the women and young girls who are now living a better life due to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities in their communities. Their days spent fetching clean water and suffering from simple water borne diseases have been drastically cut due to the completion of water facilities that Blue Planet Network has funded. 

Thank you to all our donors for continuing to make these uplifting stories possible. 

However Blue Planet Network's work is far from done, and we will keep you updated each step of the way.

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Kalembo Secondary School, Songea Ruvuma, Tanzania
Project Implementer : Ruvuma Mission to the Poor and Disables (PADI)

"We students of Kalembo Secondary school, we send our greetings of thanks to you [Blue Planet Network], all our fellow Schools from USA, and all others who in one way or another have helped us access Clean and safe water in our school. The bore hole you have build for us has reduced several problems we have been facing for more than 6 years now. Among the problems we have been facing are: 1) Loosing several classes due to long distance moving to collect some water 2) Drinking un-safe water for our health as we were fetching from local dug wells 3) School building construction was also tough as we traveled the same distance in order to get water for the work. 4) The same wells we used to collect some water we were sharing with animals like pigs and dogs. Your assistance has made us free from above problems. We are now ensured with good health and improving our academic performance as most of our time will be used in academic issues.

Thank you very much for considering our need.

Yous sincerely,

Eisha Shaban - Head Girl "

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Chamasowa Village, Malawi | Litchenza Samuti and Chamasowa Project
Project Implementer : Water For People

"My name is Rhoda Chiputu, I am 10 years old. I come from Chamasowa Village and am in Standard 3 at Chamasowa Primary School....Now that there is a borehole in my community, the scarce drinking water has become easily accessible; the distance to the water source has been much reduced; and this rainy season I have not suffered from diarrhea. I now spend less time collecting water than before and have more time to do my homework and concentrate in school. My performance is improving."

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Kalampatzon, Guatemala
Project Implementer : Agua Para la Salud

Date of Visit: April 2010 | Report by: Jodi Moss | Photos by: Tristan Moss

Petrona Matrom Cobo’s life has changed significantly since the Guatemalan not-for-profit organization Agua para la Salud, installed a water distribution system in her village (Kalampatzon) in 2009 and 2010 with funding from Blue Planet Network. Before this, Petrona walked about three kilometers each way to a nearby river to collect water. Several trips each day were required to collect enough water for her family of seven. Petrona also carried her laundry each day to her relative’s house in their neighboring village.

Petrona now has a faucet with running water next to her kitchen. This leaves Petrona with more time. She is able to make her children’s clothes and she is better able to tend her crops. She composts, and uses the grey water from her faucet to irrigate her garden. Last year, she fed her family almost entirely from her garden and did not have to buy any corn (Guatemala’s staple food). All of these things save her money.

Kalampatzon’s new water system also is relieving population pressures in neighboring villages. During the civil war, Kalampatzon was destroyed and its residents were forced to flee from their homes. Only about ten of 55 families returned to Kalampatzon after the war. The others moved to overpopulated neighboring villages. Now that Kalampatzon has a water system, the families are starting to rebuild their homes and return to their land.

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Rhoda & Students - Malawi
Rhoda & Students - Malawi
Petrona & her daughter - Guatemala
Petrona & her daughter - Guatemala

Links:

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