The Butterfly Tree

The Butterfly Tree's aim is to improve the lives of vulnerable people living in remote villages in Zambia. To advance the education and improve the facilities in rural schools, giving every child a chance to be educated. To protect the health of patients by developing the rural clinics offering support sevices, medical supplies and equipment. To relieve poverty and improve the living conditions of socially disadvantaged communities teaching them how to become sustainable.
Aug 26, 2015

Educating Orphans

Donated Jumpers and Hats
Donated Jumpers and Hats

Zambia has 1.2 million orphans as a result of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. The Butterfly Tree has provided an orphan support program for orphaned children from remote villages since 2006.

Sadly it will be a whole generation before a significant difference can be made. In the meantime it is essential for these vulnerable children receive a sound basic education to enable them to be free of the poverty cycle.

River View School in the Sekute Chiefdom is just one of the many schools that receives support from The Butterfly Tree. This school is close to the border of Botswana. There is a high statistic of people living with HIV in this area due to it being a border town, where truckers can wait up to three days to cross the river. This puts a huge strain on the limited medical facilities and the NGO's working in the field on HIV prevention and support.  

Less than a mile from River View School a new town of Kazungula is being developed. The school has 1,181 pupils of which 180 are orphans. Every week the school receives new pupils with the every increasing number of people coming to the area for work. There is a bridge being built across the river which will take six years to complete and has attracted workers from all over Zambia.

In 2013 we opened a special education unit at River View and most recently donated funds to complete a pre-school for the very young children. It is hoped that by giving this support it will help to protect these children from the dangers of HIV and the issues related to poverty.

Last month we were able to give a donation to River View School to buy a considerable amount of text books. The Ministry of Education recently changed the syllabus, but were unable to provide sufficient books for each class. This year we have also donated blankets, school jumpers and hats, knitted by the ladies of Inner Wheel Clubs UK, to provide warmth for the orphans during the cold winter nights between June and August.

Your support is greatly appreciated, but much more is needed for River View School.  

Links:

Aug 26, 2015

More Schools to Receive Seeds

New Bore Hole and Indian Hand Pump
New Bore Hole and Indian Hand Pump

Bunsanga is a remote village in the Nyawa Chiefdom of Zambia. Up until now they have never received any support from charities. The Butterfly Tree recently donated a bore hole and Indian Hand Pump to Bunsanga School, which will enable them to have a sustainable feeding program. In October they will be able to plant a vegetable garden before the onset of the rainy season. It was humbling to hear that this was the first time the children and community members had ever tasted fresh clean water. 

Water is essential for all forms of life. It is four months since a drop of rain fell in Zambia, for many vulnerable families at this time of year there is a shortage of food. Children walk to school on empty stomachs relying on the school to provide a morning porridge. This is funded by the World Food Program, but sadly there is never enough for every school, some only receive the donation for one term out of three, others do not receive anything.

The Seeds for Life in Zambia project helps schools to become sustainable so that they do not have to rely on the World Food Program. Local women cook the food grown by the pupils, which is especially beneficial for those having to walk long distances to get to school. During the dry season if the school has a bore hole it provides a continual supply of fresh water, not only for drinking, but also for irrigating a school garden.

Having a feeding program helps to improve the children's performance and attendance. Zambians' staple diet is maize, but we are looking at alternative crops as maize is rain dependent. One school at Singwamba has started growing breadfruit and once the project progresses they will donate seeds to other schools. This is an excellent form of sustainability as it makes them less dependent on internatonal aid. Breadfruit is highly nutritious and the trees do not need a great deal of water.

We must reach out to more remote schools and give them the same chance as schools such as Bunsanga, which is the fitteenth school to receive a bore hole through Thr Butterfly Tree.

Links:

Aug 26, 2015

New Malaria Prevention Launch for Zambia

Mozzimort Coating for Malaria Prevention
Mozzimort Coating for Malaria Prevention

I have just returned from a very productive visit to Zambia with the highlight being the launch of our new innovative malaria prevention project. This took place at the Avani Victoria Falls Resort on July 29th and was attended by the Deputy Permanent Secretary, Government Health and Education officials, District Commissioners, Leading Members of the Communities, the Tourism Sector and the Chamber of Commerce.

After my opening address the Deputy Permanent Secretary gave a speech, followed by a presentation of the malaria prevention products by Stain Musungaila, The Butterfly Tree member who manages the project in Zambia. This was gratefully received by the Ministries and Heads of the Communities, and was subsequently reported in the national press.

 

Malaria remains the number one killer of man. 75% of all deaths occur in children under the age of five in sub-Sahara Africa. Every 60 second a child dies from malaria. With a vaccine yet to be approved by the World Health Organisation malaria prevention is essential. According to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine these advanced products, supplied by Vectorcide UK and manufactured in a cutting edge laboratory in Poland, are far superior to anything else currently available on the global market.

The first shipment has arrived in Zambia and is being distributed in villages in the Mukuni Chiefdom where there is a high prevalence of malaria. Chuunga, Kamwi and Syaflwebafweba reported almost four hundred cases of malaria last year. It is imperative that we get these village houses covered with Mozzimort before the onset of the rainy season.

 

The Ministry of Health, the National Malaria Control Centre, the Zambian Scientific Research Centre and the Environmental Agencies have been instrumental in helping us to get these products into Zambia.

We need further funds to reach out to rural communities to help prevent more loss of life.

Links:

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