Inside the Outdoors Foundation

The Mission of the Inside the Outdoors Foundation is to provide financial, educational, and advisory support to the Inside the Outdoors Science Study Programs. Inside the Outdoors programs empower students, teachers, parents and the community through hands-on educational experiences in the natural world to expand their knowledge, understanding and stewardship of the environment.
Aug 26, 2015

The Wonder of Nature Comes Alive for Students

Wildflower Butterfly Garden starter kits
Wildflower Butterfly Garden starter kits

On Sunday, August 16, 2015, Inside the Outdoors Foundation partnered with Disney Citizenship and Disney VoluntEARS at the D23 Expo to host a volunteer project involving guests at the event.  Attendees worked their way through an assembly line constructing 3,500 wildflower butterfly garden started kits and picked up water saving tip materials and resources, provided by the Municipal Water District of Orange County and Anaheim Public Utilities, along the way.  These kits, including California native butterfly mix seeds, peat pots, soil pellets and growing and planting instructions, were also hand decorated by D23 patrons. 

The Wildflower Butterfly Garden starter kits will be donated to schools in underserved communities to be used as a fundraising option.  All proceeds from the sale of the starter kits will be used to support student field trips and activities providing powerful hands-on experiences that leave children with a lifelong enthusiasm for the environment. 

Watch the wonder of nature come alive in your garden.  Each started kit includes water-wise tips and resources and the following information:

Why do butterflies matter?

Butterflies vivid wing coloration and fluttering flight path lend a special touch of beauty to nature.  However, butterflies do more than just paint a pretty picture.  They help flower pollinate, eat weed plants and provide a food source for other animals.  Their presence or absence can also tell us a lot about the local environment.

Butterflies are indicators of a healthy environment and healthy ecosystems.  Like bees and other pollinators, butterflies pick up pollen while they sip a flower’s nectar.  Once they’re off to another plant, the pollen goes with them, helping pollinate the plant species.  One third of the food we eat depends on the work of pollinators such as butterflies.

Why are native plants important to water conservation?

North American native plants are disappearing at an alarming rate due to human activities, urban development, and the introduction of invasive species.  The loss of native plant communities has reduced wildlife habitat and the genetic diversity necessary for balanced ecosystems. 

Native wildflowers, such as Goldfields, Plantain, Sky Lupine and Owl’s Clover, do much more than add beauty to the landscape.  These plants help conserve water, provide habitat for birds, butterflies and other wildlife, protect the soil and save money by reducing maintenance costs and the need for fertilizer and pesticides.

Native plants are easier to grow because they are already adapted to the soil and climate of California and their water needs are more in balance with what nature provides.  Replacing a portion of your lawn with native plants can save 120 gallons of watering for every 1000 s/f of turf removed, which is equivalent to (4) six-minute showers.

Inside the Outdoors Foundation is grateful to all of our partners on this project for helping to build environmental stewards for tomorrow.

D23 Expo visitors volunteer to support students
D23 Expo visitors volunteer to support students
Sponsorship to support K-12 environmental programs
Sponsorship to support K-12 environmental programs
3,500 kits scheduled to be delivered to schools
3,500 kits scheduled to be delivered to schools
May 28, 2015

The Arts and Science Bring Thousands Together

Thumbprint Tree
Thumbprint Tree

Along with help from Inside the Outdoors Foundation, Disney VoluntEARS, Anaheim Public Utilities and others, the Anaheim City School District (ACSD) hosted its 1st Annual International Arts Festival on May 6, 2015 at Lincoln Elementary School.

The turnout and energy was phenomenal.  An estimated 2500 Anaheim City School District students, families and community members attended the afternoon and evening festivities which included an Inside the Outdoors Foundation booth providing fun and creative arts-infused science education, and a water conservation element in partnership with Anaheim Public Utilities.

The Inside the Outdoors (ITO) booth was quite a natural fit to the arts festival.  Disney VoluntEARS were on hand to help with activities, including making a water cycle bracelet by giving context to students on the stages of the water cycle with each colored bead added.

Yellow (The Sun): Creates all of the weather on Earth through the uneven heating of the Earth’s surface

Clear (Evaporation): Liquid water is heated by the sun until it rises as water vapor into the atmosphere.

Gray (Condensation): Water vapor molecules join together, becoming liquid in the form of clouds.

Blue (Precipitation): Water falling to Earth in the form of weather (including rain, sleet, hail and snow).

Brown (Groundwater): Water found beneath the Earth’s surface.

Green (Transpiration): The evaporation of water through plants. Water enters the plant through the roots, moves up into the plant and then exits through the leaves of he plant.

In addition, the ITO booth provided an environmental activity where kids created works of art featuring trees from around the world by adding thumbprint leaves onto the canvas, and learned how much rainfall those places get compared to Anaheim, CA.  The artwork will be donated to schools in the district and auctioned off to raise funds for Arts education in the schools. “From the caves of Lascaux to La Mer to Lincoln Elementary School’s thumbprint trees, art has always been a way to validate and celebrate our fascination and close relationship with the natural world”, stated by Inside the Outdoors Foundation President, Manny Kiesser.

A further budding relationship between Inside the Outdoors and the Municipal Water District of Orange County provided a food for thought activity, “Have a Drink of Hamburger”, where the community learned how much water goes into making a single hamburger – 698½ total gallons. Most didn’t consider that water is used in each step of the overall process, from raising cattle for the meat to the wheat grown to make the bun to all the fixings.

Anaheim Public Utilities provided bags and Water Wise tips and the Disney Environmental Integration team provided giveaways such as, Care for the Earth and Get Moving wristbands, Enviornmentality activity books, Get Out & Get Moving guides and a Nature’s Treasures worksheet. These materials engaged both students and families in protecting our planet.

The well organized and executed event was a wonderful celebration of students, and by students, acknowledging that ACSD heard the community’s call for more arts and environmental science education for their kids – and are doing something about it.  Dozens of youth artwork was displayed throughout the festival and nearly 350 student performers in dance and music wowed the crowds.

We are so grateful for the continuous support of your team at Inside the Outdoors. Your presence at our most recent event was yet another great success and demonstration of your organization's commitment to building and strengthening the Anaheim community through educationSincere thanks!" - Linda Wagner, Superintendent, Anaheim City School District

Art and Science pairing has amazing possibilities along with a wonder-filled relationship between schools, communities and corporate agencies. Inside the Outdoors Foundation is committed to helping build partnerships and environmental stewards for tomorrow by continuing to explore creativity.

Skins and skulls of native animals
Skins and skulls of native animals
Guess the native animal and their adaptations
Guess the native animal and their adaptations
Water Cycle Bracelet
Water Cycle Bracelet
Mar 6, 2015

Students, STEM and Stewardship

Outdoor living laboratory
Outdoor living laboratory

Programs including students, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and stewardship improve education outcomes and build leadership skills for youth. Inside the Outdoors is in its third year of partnering with the Orange County Department of Education’s alternative education students at Sunburst Youth ChalleNGe Academy (SYCA), and multiple community partners to inspire youth people to discover, engage in and advocate for the environment. Traveling Scientist classroom visits, Field Trips, Service-Leaning community projects, and advocacy connect classroom learning through STEM-focused environmental education.

Alternative education teacher Mike Gill described that the Inside the Outdoors STEM-learning interactive field trips connected his students to learning in a powerful way. “It was like a light bulb going off. My students realized that they could learn and it changed them,” Michael shared. During the three year partnership, over 1,000 at-risk youth from SYCA have benefited through a 20% increase in assessment scores in science, technology, engineering and math. Overall, academic knowledge in STEM disciplines increased 53% in male students and 100% in female students documented by pre- and –post assessment data.

These students are documented as “at-risk” and have little success learning in a traditional educational environment, the learning environment being provided with the assistance of a grant by the TK Foundation chances their previous learning failures into successes. Having a visual tactile interface (iPads) and using them in the field engages these students in a deeper way than traditional classroom activities. In addition to field study, iPads were used with a downloaded educational app to dissect frogs virtually, allowing students the experience where a live animal lab was not possible. As a result, students began to make connections to the usage of technology in real life practical ways as well as considering possible careers in Science and Engineering fields.

 

SUCCESSES:

Field Trips

Students visited various field sites throughout Orange County. Popular among students was the Live Animal station where participants saw and touched a live mammal and reptile representative of animals in this ecosystem and learn how their adaptations enable them to survive. Continuing their learning, students explored local ecology in the pristine environment of Rancho Sonado represented by a pond, a riparian area, oak woodland, and chaparral making discoveries through hands-on activities.

Traveling Scientist

Students explored various STEM topics through hands-on labs. These programs provided hands-on opportunities for students to develop an awareness and appreciation of the sciences through the exploration of the animal kingdom and physical science concepts while fostering a commitment to the protection and understanding of the environment and community. One of the favorite lessons expressed by students was the Traveling Scientist live animal study. A Hawk, an owl and other raptors were brought into the classroom to teach students about the roles these predators play in nature. Students visited lab stations to experience hawk vision and discovered the diet of an owl through an owl pellet dissection. A student was noted as saying “When I see the Traveling Scientist from Inside the Outdoors I know it is going to be a good day.”

Service-Learning

A minimum of 40 hours of community service was required of each student attending Sunburst Youth ChalleNGe Academy. Many students volunteered their time to install and nurture a demonstration garden at the SYCA location. In addition, SYCA students worked alongside community members and mentors from Disney, Boeing and Simple Green restoring habitat at the Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge for a National Public Lands Day event.

Highlight:

A male student from Sunburst Youth ChalleNGe Academy shared that the Field Trips, Traveling Scientist sessions and Service-Learning projects made such an impact on his life that he wants to get his younger brother involved with Inside the Outdoors programs to ensure that he has opportunities to keep out of trouble by making a difference in his community and seeing the possibilities of a future in the field of science. His goal is to save enough money to send his younger brother to ITO’s week-long Summer Day Camp in 2015.

Water testing at Caspers Wilderness Park
Water testing at Caspers Wilderness Park
Learning about native wildlife - Acorn the Opossum
Learning about native wildlife - Acorn the Opossum
Ball Python - Pickles
Ball Python - Pickles

donate now:

Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $25
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $250
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $1,000
    give
  • $5,000
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $250
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $1,000
    each month
    give
  • $5,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Inside the Outdoors Foundation

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Inside the Outdoors Foundation on GreatNonProfits.org.