Kala Raksha

Kala Raksha aims: to preserve and present cultures of ethnic communities of Kutch (Gujarat, India) through their traditional arts; to facilitate the transformation of traditional art into contemporary products by encouraging innovation within existing traditions; to assist communities in achieving economic self-sufficiency through cooperative efforts; to assist direct sale of contemporary arts, for entire local communities. Artisan initiative and participation are the pillars of our work.
Oct 29, 2012

Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya Shines

KALA RAKSHA VIDHYALAYA SHINES AT INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

PROJECT REPORT

9 JULY-29 OCTOBER  2012

FROM CULTURAL IDENTITY TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Kala Raksha demonstrated its cutting edge approach in a paper presented at the Textile Society of America's 13th Biennial Symposium, held in Washington DC in September 2012.  As part of the panel Artisan Enterprises: Challenges for Sustainability, Project Director Judy Frater used the example of Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya to illustrate how artisans could utilize their cultural identity as a key resource to increase the value of their traditions in the contemporary market.  In a three day event attended by delegates from over 30 countries, the panel was one of the best attended.  A synopsis follows:

In Kutch, ethnic communities have embroidered for centuries.  This traditional art was never assigned commercial value.  It was created for social exchange and, above all, proclaimed identity. Yet, each piece was always unique; the concept of repetitive production was completely alien.

Commercialization of traditions provided a viable income to artisans, but ultimately its industrial model—a goal of faster, cheaper and more uniform—and its disregard for tradition, insidiously eroded the artisans' sense of aesthetics and self worth. This threat to cultural heritage motivated Kala Raksha to take the challenge of creating work with cultural integrity for the contemporary fashion market.  The Trust began with a museum of local textiles, and encouraged artisans to draw from their traditions.  Yet, artisans were still considered laborers. 

 

Kala Raksha observed that in their own living traditions, artisans created exciting solutions for design problems.  An experiment with a bag designed by Pabiben

proved that these artisan designed works were highly marketable.  The Trust was clear that income could not justify the loss of cultural heritage; empowerment must be cultural as well as economic.  We knew that we needed to think of alternatives to the industrial development model, and to take into account intellectual property—not only skills but also knowledge, and transfer these important assets to new arenas. We returned to the challenge of maintaining cultural identity and increasing value for handwork, with the understanding that the artist is the steward of tradition. Thus, in 2005 Kala Raksha launched Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya- the first design school for artisans-- as a sustainable solution for the survival of craft traditions.

KRV encourages artisans to draw inspiration from their traditions and nature, to see, and to think. The curriculum guides artisans to appreciate the unique aspects of their traditions in the context of the world. Students have expanded their cultural knowledge about the global market by learning to segment markets and to interpret and evoke trend forecasts.

The year-long course teaches artisans to use a variety of media, to work with different ethnic groups, and a range of ages.

Graduates have gained confidence as well as the ability to effectively reach new markets. They have expanded their capacity to create, their prerogative to collaborate, and their ability to connect to clients. 

Each artisan makes a final collection, which is juried by craft and design professionals and presented in a fashion show with a public attendance in thousands.  The fashion show has highly motivated artisans, and has been an important instrument in educating the public to think about craft and artisans in other ways. 

In 2010, Kala Raksha launched the concept Artisan Design, a trademark to certify that a product is an artisan’s own creative innovation.  Subsequently, Kala Raksha has employed graduates to design a new line of Art to Wear garments.  So we find we have come full circle, to the original concept of each piece as a unique work of art!  The concept Artisan Design eventually accesses intellectual property to raise income and respect above the level of manual labor. 

Kala Raksha's challenges now are to reach markets that appreciate and value products with cultural integrity, and to equip artisans to effectively tap cultural heritage for contemporary markets. As fashion draws worlds closer, this becomes very possible. When a Pabi bag sells briskly in New York and a village artisan purchases a top from Fabindia, Kala Raksha artisans can think of wearing the garments they make-- as they always did.

ARTISAN DESIGN

In July and September, Kala Raksha tested two collections of one of a kind art to wear jackets.  The market response was unanimous: both sold out!  And each collection is better through the continued experience of design.  The Artisan Designer group has been institutionalized at Kala Raksha.

YEAR 7 AT KRV

July to October saw the grand finale of KRV classes. From 15 July to 2 September, the students worked to complete their collections.  Course 6- Merchandising, Presentation, was taught by Sanjukta Roy from 3 September to 13 October, with a two week break in between for local holidays.  Sanjukta had taught the men's section last year, and utilized her experience to enrich the curriculum.             

In the men's class, artisan students learned to photograph their own work and organize it as portfolios.  Each student created a brand identity and logo.  They focused on the always important skill of editing and learned to display and present their work.  For the final presentation, KRV graduates as well as family members gave important feedback that will help put the final touches on each student's collection.

The women's class made great efforts in the final class of the year to overcome chronic shyness.  The progress in this two week intensive session was clearly evident in the final presentation.  The women used the course as an opportunity to review the year's work, as well as learning photography, graphic design, and editing.

Each student created a logo and brand identity.  Sanjukta also taught them the simple, traditional technique of wrapped packaging.  At the final presentation, the class enjoyed a great sense of achievement. 

THE SEVENTH ANNUAL KRV CONVOCATION MELA

Mark you calendars for our annual graduation party!  This year, 18 artisans will graduate on 2 December 2012.  The final jury will be held from 30 November to 1 December, and the gala Fashion show will enthrall visitors on the evening of 1 December.  Chief Guest and keynote speaker for the Convoation is National Institute of Design Director Pradyumna Vyas.  For details see the home page of www.kala-raksha.org

INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Networking and collaborating with established design institutes is a goal for KRV.  A proposal for establishing an MOU with a major design institute is under discussion. 

In August, Kala Raksha hosted workshops for students of the Maret School in Wahsington DC.  KRV Director Judy Frater met the students and faculty in September.  We hope to develop an annual program with this very progressive school.Also in August, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya held a workshop with Jennifer Varekamp

Associate Professor, Fashion Design Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

In October, Kala Raksha and the Vidhyalaya hosted a two week program with Lindsay Roberts and Jennifer Allison, Scottish artists participating in the ReSide residency program of Creative Scotland's ‘Creative Futures.’ The first of two exchanges, this trip was to gain maximum experience.  Lindsay and Jeni spent time with the women's final course at KRV, offering feedback and insights, and did workshops in weaving, printing and bandhani with KARVADA tutors.  Exchanges went several ways and the women students learned knitting and indigo dyeing along with Lindsay and Jeni.  Finally, the Scottish artists attended a KARVADA meeting, where they shared their art work and experiences in Kutch.  KRV graduate Murjibhai Hamir, who had been to Scotland on the same program, shared his experiences with the group as well.  We are all excited to see the creative results of this enriching program.

ALUMNI AND OUTREACH

KRV Visiting Faculty member LOkesh Ghai and KRV Advisor Shyamjibhai Vishramji participated as Artists in Residence in the Cotton Exchange Project in Manchester, UK.  The program centered on four stories, two of which were Kala Raksha and KRV graduate Khalid Amin Khatri.  Exhibitions of work were held at the Manchester Art Gallery and the Harris Museum in September, and the Gallery of Costume in October. 

KARVADA president Juned Ismail Khatri participated very successfully in the Crafts Council of India's sari exhibition in Delhi in September, underscoring the importance of design in tradition.  KARVADA is now working toward a solo show in Mumbai in December, and KARVADA and KRV women graduates are all working together toward a major event in Delhi.

KRV online

In September 2012, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya enjoyed a feature by Jessica Marati "Teaching Design," in Hand/Eye magazine. 

In October 2011, Annie Waterman published "Empowering the Artisans" an article about KRV in Hand/Eye. Articles on Artisan Design have also been published in three important online craft journals: Hand/Eye  www.handeyemagazine.com 3 February 2010; Craft Unbound www.craftunbound.net 27 January 2011, and the Craft Revival Trust Newsletter www.craftrevival.org vol 110, issue 2 Winter-Spring 2011.

You can find Kala Raksha Artisan Designed work online at www.equalcraft.com

Kala Raksha is now on Facebook 

THANKS TO GLOBAL GIVING!

The Indian financial year spans between April 2012 and March 2013, and our seventh year of classes is completed. KRV relies entirely on donations.  This year, we have the challenge of raising almost $75,000 to operate our program. We are happy to announce that we have reached about half of our goal.

Global Giving has made a substantial contribution.   Prompted by the October Matching Day, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya received an additional $900, bringing the total to $1,700 this year. As one donor wrote, “The Global giving website is easy to navigate. It makes giving so much easier.” Your generous contribution can help! You can make a difference in the lives of our very creative constituency!!

THE NEXT PHASE

As KRV has focused on becoming more self sustaining, opportunities are coming our way.  In this year we will institute the sale of educational materials to raise funds, in addition to workshops for which we steadily receive inquiries.  We are also planning a major fund raising event in the February.  Financial sustainability is always a huge challenge for an educational institution.  We welcome any entrepreneurial ideas –and ideas for increasing visibility-from our supporters.

And again we thank you, our supporters.  With your support, KRV will realize its mission of relevant, genuine education for traditional artisans!


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Oct 22, 2012

KALA RAKSHA MUSEUM BASED PRODUCTS WOW AT SANTA FE

Lachhuben teaching
Lachhuben teaching

KALA RAKSHA MUSEUM BASED PRODUCTS 

WOW THE SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET 

KALA RAKSHA MUSEUM

PROJECT REPORT 9 JULY- 20 OCTOBER 2012

Since its inception, Kala Raksha has dovetailed the collection and preservation of traditional pieces with income generation.  The Trust established an international quality Museum of textiles and related materials in 1997. Two features of this Museum make it unique.  First, the Museum is based in the village itself. Artisans have access to and responsibility for it.  Second, artisans were involved in all phases of the development of the Museum.  They assisted in collection, were engaged in documentation, and consulted in the permanent exhibition.  The Kala Raksha Museum successfully proves the mutual benefits of involving communities in presenting and utilizing their own cultures.

The Museum is intended as a resource base for artisans, designers and researchers. Traditions embody the identity and heritage of a people. Increased appropriation of design intellectual property across cultures has resulted in a generic commercial ethnic look, as well as loss of knowledge of textile traditions.   Kala Raksha's challenge increasingly is to innovate within traditions, and to tell the story that makes cultural integrity more valuable. 

As Kala Raksha artisans develop contemporary designs based on the museum collections, they tell their own story, enhancing the value of their traditions.

SUCCESS IN SANTA FE AND BEYOND

This year, Kala Raksha's museum inspired accessory collection earned it the important opportunity to participate in the 2012 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market.  This venue draws an enthusiastic crowd, which appreciates and purchases tradition-based products.  Rabari artisan coordinators Lachhuben Raja and Rajabhai Pachan, traveled to Santa Fe, supported by a generous travel grant from Tata Power.  The new products, consciously developed by Kala Raksha artisan interns, had cultural integrity as well as quality workmanship.  Sales were excellent. 

In Santa Fe, artisan representatives experienced the international market directly. Following, Kala Raksha conducted a three-week tour of five venues of workshops, lectures and sales. The tour benefited all of the artisans of Tunda Vandh and the greater artisan community. The entire Kala Raksha constituency earned from their education and efforts. Workshop participants learned an array of stitching techniques from Lachhuben, and worked on projects of their choice.  Rajabhai created traditional motifs for them in machine embroidery.  They chose the motifs from the workshop booklet provided by Kala Raksha.  Lachhuben and Rajabhai's demonstrations and explanations instantly enhance the value of their work. Knowledge is appreciation!

A program was held at the Fowler Museum, on the UCLA campus, a leading museum of ethnography.  It holds an important collection of embroideries from Kutch, collected in the mid 1970s by Vickie Elson, who published her research on the collection as Dowries of Kutch, in 1979.  Barbara Sloan, Associate Director, Center for the Study of Regional Dress, invited the Kala Raksha team to conduct a “Textile Roundtable” program for the Fowler Textile Council.   About 30 textile enthusiasts joined us for several hours.  We examined a selected of Kutch embroidered textiles.  It was a rare treat to have two Rabari artisans as well as a textile scholar discuss the objects.  We compared current work with work of three decades past, and discussed current trends and issues.

Kala Raksha also conducted four trunk show sales in addition to workshops.  Response was excellent, nearly doubling Kala Raksha's Santa Fe earnings.  The philosophy of these shows can be summed up in the slogan of the fair trade shop Fabric of Life, in Edmonds:  "Do Good; Feel Good; Look Good."

The tour was a resounding success.  At the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, having a really robust and varied sampling of clients in a short time gave important market intelligence.  Other trunk shows similarly provided direct and immediate feedback with clients from different regions.  The intimate experience of another culture will enhance our ability to design for those markets.

In our workshops, participants gained an increased appreciation of the creativity and skill of traditional artisans as they could not have in another way:

"I will never look at handmade things in the same way again.  I have a completely new appreciation of hand work.  I understand the personal quality," Lori Harris, Los Angeles.

"I have Attention Deficit Disorder.  I really think that this experience helped me learn to focus in a new way," participant from the Seattle workshop.

Finally, the earnings were literally rain in an impending drought.  Summer is always a time of slow sales in India, even while we are producing for the winter sales season.  

CONTINUING EDUCATION

INTERN INSPIRATION

We now have a clearer idea what people like and that went directly into refining products and developing new ones.  Understanding target markets is the most essential aspect of successful designing.  Lachhuben planned a refinement of one product in the plane back to Mumbai.  Drawing on our museum objects to create new collections, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya graduate design interns got straight to work creating samples for next year's Santa Fe Market application.

ACCESSION OF NEW COLLECTIONS

Since the last report, the Global Giving disbursement was received. The excellent exchange rate enabled us to accession seven of eighteen home quilts earmarked in March. 

As rural cultures change more rapidly that could be imagined, Kala Raksha is very happy for the opportunity to document and preserve Kutch textile traditions.

VISITORS AND RESEARCHERS

During this period Kala Raksha hosted workshops for students of the prestigious Maret School of Washington DC., an American quilters group, two Scottish artist residents of the ReSide project, and three international researchers exploring the importance of telling the stories of sustainability in art.  All utilized the Museum as well as working with Kala Raksha artisans.

BOOK RESEARCH

Research for Kala Raksha's book on Kutch embroideries, which will highlight the Kala Raksha Museum collections, resumed in August.  Three contributors are hard at work.  With the rapid modernization of Kutch villages, we realize that this is probably the last chance to glean information from the heritage held in our Museum collections.  Aging artisans now struggle to place the work we show them.  Our creative team has captured critical information that will make an invaluable contribution to the field.  We have established a deadline for the manuscript for January 2013.

THANKS TO GLOBALGIVING!

Again, our report follows a Global Giving Bonus Day, and again we are happily grateful.  On 17 October Kala Raksha Museum received donations totaling $750, which will be matched by Global Giving.  Kala Raksha Trust is self sustaining in its income generation work- a feat not even attempted by many non-profits.  However, the earnings from our income generation cannot cover the costs of expansion of The Kala Raksha Museum, which is the core of our sustainable, authentic work.  Generous donations from our supporters enable us to add to our collections, and host projects that utilize our resource. 

Global Giving has enabled us to reactivate our museum work. We thank Global Giving donors for your support, and welcome financial contributions as well as ideas for ways to reach out and share our holdings with interested people.

THE NEXT PHASE: NEW ACCESSIONS TO BE FINALIZED

The next Global Giving grant disbursement will allow us to accession objects of special relevance to the embroidery book research as well as more of the home quilt collection.  Collections of traditional women's blouses and work from Eastern Kutch have been earmarked.  As research progresses, we will be able to make the best selection of new accessions.

Maret School workshop.jpg
Maret School workshop.jpg
Museum inspired jackets.jpg
Museum inspired jackets.jpg
Santa Fe customer.jpg
Santa Fe customer.jpg
Scottish ReSide.jpg
Scottish ReSide.jpg
Vagad toplo.jpg
Vagad toplo.jpg

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Jul 9, 2012

KRV STUDENTS GO FROM AHMEDABAD TO THE WORLD

Eager women students in class
Eager women students in class

KALA RAKSHA VIDHYALAYA

STUDENTS GO FROM AHMEDABAD TO THE WORLD

 "I learned a lot from Tanvir!" Prateek, student of Pearl Academy, Delhi

"We will never see textile arts in the same way; we have learned to appreciate them," Niharika, student of Pearl Academy, Delhi

 PROJECT REPORT

14 APRIL- 8 JULY 2012 

YEAR 7 AT KRV

April to July saw the majority of KRV classes in action. In the men's Market Orientation course, taught by veteran KRV Faculty Lokesh Ghai, artisans took a three day field trip to Ahmedabad city.  There, they considered art as well as design, visiting artists, galleries and shops and absorbing experiences with great intensity.  On return, they created designs for individuals and shops they had visited.  As always the individual catapulted them beyond known limitations.  Craft remains essentially personal. 

"I learned that people want quality and are ready to pay; I saw it everywhere." Tanveer, class of 2012 

"We learned from the Chitaras that if you work carefully, you can create your own work and name," Salman, class of 2012

In the Women's Market Orientation course, taught by veteran KRV Faculty Shweta Dhariwal, the group also visited shops and homes in Ahmedabad, many for the first time in their lives. This year we saw a clear indication of a narrowing of the gap between artisans and contemporary consumers, when the women purchased garments, household decorations, ornaments, organic tea and underwear from a range of shops they visited. The students felt the prices were appropriate.  More important, their taste coincided with urban offerings, and they demonstrated concern for issues such as natural and organic fibers. By the end of the course, the women realized they had underpriced themselves, and began to calculate the value of their thoughts as well as efforts.

  "We visited Carminaben and Shimolben's homes to see how they decorate; we don't do that in our homes," Parmaben, class of 2012

"At House of Mangaldas, they created new things from old!" Hetalben, class of 2012

The men's fourth class, Concept, Communication, Projects, taught by Neha Puri, began with learning to stylize- and most importantly not to stop with "It will do." As permanent faculty member Dayalalbhai says, "'It will do' always means just the opposite!" The next step in learning to express a concept was reflecting on professional trend forecast boards.  Though we have used these boards in a number of classes before, each person sees through his own experiences.  This year, Snow Palace became Vijay Vilas, and Tropical Tango became the Bhuj railway station! The group took a field trip from KRV to Banni and back to Mandvi.  On return and much further pondering, Vijay Vilas evolved to Treasure Hunt…. And the railway station became Life's Journey.

The men worked earnestly in finalizing their colour palettes, creating a motif bank, and thinking of appropriate layouts. This was a tough class of long hours thinking, a realm not preferred by men who work with their hands.  But by the final presentation, they realized they had come a long way in developing new directions for their work. 

 KRV alumni Shakilbhai and Anwarbhai gave invaluable input in the final presentation. 

Anwarbhai- "A concept is the basis of a collection.  The effort starts here.  Until you get into it, you have to persevere." 

Shakilbhai- "You have to get so into your theme that you see it everywhere.  I started buying clothes in the colours of my theme!  You can't get the original look, texture from a picture.  Nature is the biggest treasure house."

Soyabbhai agreed, "When the leaf dried, the colour changed and the texture emerged.  That is the specialty of nature.  In making motifs, I began to understand."

  Since KRV's inception, the women's Concept course has had the challenge of having fabric appropriate to different embroidery styles ready in the colours the students choose for their themes. This year, Visiting Faculty Sanchari Mahapatra decided to begin with the colours and create a theme from those selected.  While practical, the approach needs some fine tuning to insure that the themes lead to visual imagery and experiences to which the artisans can directly relate. The use of international trends in craft is itself challenging and controversial.  But ultimately it takes artisans beyond their colour comfort zones to fresh explorations.  A note on this observation to renowned trend forecaster LA Colours resulted in a generous donation of new trend books, which we will relish next year.  This year, the women went on a field trip to Mandvi, and when they could not go to an inspiration, they brought one to KRV.  For her theme "children," Jivaben called nearby Vandh children and interviewed them on our campus.

The women revised their theme boards, made some sketches, and finally began working on a motif bank in embroidery. 

 KRV's fifth class: Finishing, Collection Development, is the most complex of the year.  Since 2008, KRV has incorporated collaboration with urban design students to create patterns for new designs.  In this year's men's course, taught by Shweta Dhariwal and Shital Naik,  four students from Pearl Institute worked with the KRV weavers, printers and bandhani artists.  The brief for the project was for KRV students to indicate the basic range of the collections they wish to create.  The Pearl students would collaboratively decide on silhouettes, and create patterns and prototypes, and the KRV students would be responsible for the surface/ craft design, and ultimately for the products.  A basic pre-requisite of collaboration is mutual understanding and respect. A key goal for the project was to provide an intensive one-to one experience with traditional artisans in an educational environment, so that the Pearl students could learn how artisans think and work, learn to assess technical strengths and limitations, and thus learn to design to capitalize upon a craft, rather than use craft to embellish a design

On day one, when all of the students introduced themselves and presented their work to date, the vast difference between the rural and urban worlds was starkly clear.  Further, it was clear that the institutional environments, methods and pace were very different.  Pearl students shared that they made a several garments in a year.  At KRV they were going to make eight to sixteen garments in two weeks!

By the second week, teams were intently working on patterns and test fits.  The delight of Australian visitors cheered everyone on. And by the end of the class each team had developed a visible harmony.  As the Pearl students prepared to leave, they said they would never look at textile arts in the same way again; they had learned to appreciate how they were made and would think in terms of creating garments to best use them.  This was a clear indication of success.  

 Lokesh Ghai taught the women's fifth session.  Beginning with a review of theme development, he then taught some basics of finishing techniques. Using the humble bori button, he illustrated how each detail of finishing can support a theme, and guided the women to creatively and practically explore their themes further.  The women's section collaborators this year are students from MS.University, Baroda.  Building on last year's experience, the MSU students were asked to familiarize themselves with Kutch embroidery traditions through a visit to the Kala Raksha museum. This will equip them to highlight the strengths of each tradition in their designs.

As we go to press, the younger KRV students are meanwhile taking tutorials in their traditions from mentor and KRV graduate Hariyaben, and studying further finishing techniques with Kala Raksha master tailor Rameshbhai.

INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Networking and collaborating with established design institutes is a goal for KRV.  This year we are happy to be collaborating with both Pearl Academy in Delhi and M.S. University, Baroda. 

KRV's April natural dye workshop with Jagada Rajappa was pronounced the best so far by its participants.  Held on the KRV residential campus over a six-day period, the workshop worked because of sustained input- one of KRV's core strengths.  We look forward to see implementation of new skills in this year's KARVADA collections.

 Design and craft workshops are planned with students of Maret School, USA, in August, The ReSide residency program of Creative Scotland's ‘Creative Futures’ in October, and Dr. Gabriele Tautscher, Kultur Institut für SA, in February. 

 ALUMNI AND OUTREACH

Mark your calendars!  You can meet 2006 Graduate Lachhuben Raja at the 2012 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market- 13-15 July 2012.  After this wonderful event, the Kala Raksha team will teach workshops in Rabari traditions in Los Angeles and Seattle.  The trip is generously sponsored by Coastal Gujarat Power Limited- Tata Power.  Look for details on www.kala-raksha.org

KRV women graduates collaborated with UK fiber artist Alice Kettle in an exhibition in the Queen Street Mill, Burnley, BB10 2HX as part of the Cotton Exchange Project Global Threads from May 31-July 15, 2012.

 2008 KRV Graduate Murjibhai Hamir has been selected to participate in ReSide, a four month residency in Scotland.  In September he will travel to Scotland for the first round. 

 KRV’s website www.kala-vidhyalaya.org is gaining a following.  The men's e-portfolios have been instrumental in short listing participants in a December event in Mumbai, and securing participation in an India-Australia residency with Happy Hands for graduates Aakib Khatri and Hanif Khatri.  The women's portfolios are in the final stages of production. 

 The current Kala Raksha women design interns have finished a series of art to wear garments for the USA market.  They benefited from input from Rhode Island School of Design faculty and students, and fellows from the organization NEST.  In an amazing critique of works in process, it was clear that the Kala Raksha Artisan Designers and the RISD Design Faculty were not only speaking the same language, but also following very similar trains of thought.  The review strengthened the work and we are anticipating a great response. 

While the USA garments were being finished, the next project began.  KARVADA and KRV women graduates are all working together toward a major event in Mumbai.  NIFT students Divotsana from Bangalore and Nisha from Kunnur  are facilitating development of all new collections for this event.  Look for details in the next KRV News.

 A beautiful colour feature on Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya has been published in the March 2012 Marg Magazine

KRV online

 In October 2011, Annie Waterman published "Empowering the Artisans" an article about KRV in Hand/Eye  Articles on Artisan Design have also been published in three important online craft journals: Hand/Eye  www.handeyemagazine.com 3 February 2010; Craft Unbound www.craftunbound.net 27 January 2011, and the Craft Revival Trust Newsletter www.craftrevival.org vol 110, issue 2 Winter-Spring 2011.

 You can find Kala Raksha Artisan Designed work online at www.equalcraft.com

Kala Raksha is now on Facebook 

Project Director Judy Frater will present a paper at the September meeting of Textile Society of America in association with a chapter in the forthcoming Berg Publications Fashion Handbook.

 THANKS TO GLOBAL GIVING!

The Indian financial year spans between April 2012 and March 2013, and our seventh year of classes is well underway.  KRV raised $72,309 to cover the academic year of 2011.  Of this, 5% was earned through the sustainability program, and 7% was raised through individual donations- the equivalent of four scholarships.

KRV relies entirely on donations.  This year, we have the challenge of raising almost $75,000 to operate our program. We are happy to announce that we have reached about half of our goal.

 Global Giving has made a substantial contribution.   Prompted by the June Matching Day, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya received $750 this year.

 As one donor wrote, “The Global giving website is easy to navigate. It makes giving so much easier.” Your generous contribution can help! You can make a difference in the lives of our very creative constituency!!

 

THE NEXT PHASE

As KRV has focused on becoming more self sustaining, opportunities are coming our way.  In this year we will institute the sale of educational materials to raise funds, in addition to workshops for which we steadily receive inquiries.  We are also planning a major fund raising event in the fall.  Financial sustainability is always a huge challenge for an educational institution.  We welcome any entrepreneurial ideas –and ideas for increasing visibility-from our supporters.

 And again we thank you, our supporters.  With your support, KRV will realize its mission of relevant, genuine education for traditional art

Homework review begins the next class
Homework review begins the next class
KRV students collaborate with Pearl Academy
KRV students collaborate with Pearl Academy
Collaborative garment!
Collaborative garment!
Women learn traditions from graduate mentors
Women learn traditions from graduate mentors

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