Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Our mission is to improving the health, education and food security of families in Indigenous and rural communities in Latin America. We seek to strengthen vulnerable families by serving women and children, with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples in the Lake Atitlan region of Guatemala and other rural, coffee-growing communities in Latin America through integrated, school-based health & education programs. Pueblo a Pueblo was founded on the belief that meaningful and sustainable change requires the commitment and active involvement of the individual, community or organization that will benefit from that change. Pueblo a Pueblo strives to deepen values such as personal responsibility, se...
Nov 6, 2014

Getting Ready for the Bees

Our project technician with a honey panel
Our project technician with a honey panel

Springtime in Guatemala is coming and our beekeeping groups are getting ready for another great harvest! Since the project started in late 2013, participating groups have produced over 250 pounds of honey that’s been sold in local cafes, hotels, grocery stores, and restaurants, and they’re hoping to do even better come November.

To get ready for the harvest our project technician is working with seventeen farmers from Totolya and Pampojila to construct three more beehives and several panels to house more bees, as well as helping to clean up the current hive sites and maintain the surrounding lands.

Perhaps the most interesting addition to the project is the plan to plant colorful flowers in order to attract more bees to the hives and to sweeten the flavor of the honey. You may not know this, but the color, texture, and taste of honey is derived from the pollen and flowers surrounding the apiary. Here in Guatemala, we are lucky to have a variety of vegetation that begins to bloom in October, paving the way for sweeter and more abundant honey harvests.

For example, over the next few weeks we’ll start to see the budding of the Acajete tree, which produces sweet, translucent nectar. Next to blossom are beautiful yellow wildflowers, followed by avocado trees. The last to bloom are citrus trees and, finally, coffee plants, whose bright red seeds transform into the coffee we all love to drink.

While the Guatemalan countryside becomes lush and colorful, bees will be buzzing from flower to flower, collecting pollen and producing hundreds of pounds of golden honey for sale by farmers in need across the region.

Returning from the hives!
Returning from the hives!
Group members look on during a training
Group members look on during a training
Nov 5, 2014

Stepping Stones to Dreams

Students walk onto stage for 6th grade graduation
Students walk onto stage for 6th grade graduation

The school year is coming to an end and we’re excited to announce that 17 of our sponsored students will be graduating from the 6th grade! As you already know, this is no small feat. In Guatemala only 60% of students who started school in the first grade complete the 6th grade. The situation is even worse in rural, indigenous communities like Santiago Atitlan where 44% of the population remains illiterate. A variety of factors keep children from completing their education, but one of the biggest is that families often lack the money for pay for basic school supplies and uniforms.  

Take Micaela’s story, for example. Earlier this year, Micaela (pictured below) was almost certain she wouldn’t get to graduate. She’s the youngest of eight children and her parents were struggling to provide for her education. Every day to help out she would make beaded bracelets to sell to tourists on the main street in town.  

One day Micaela’s teachers at the Panabaj Primary School identified her as an ideal candidate for Pueblo a Pueblo’s support because “she’s both dedicated and responsible,” according to Johanny, our project manager. Since then, Micaela has been able to focus on her studies rather than worry about affording to stay in school. This October she's one of our 6th grade graduates and dreams to become a lawyer!

This is why we’re so thankful to all of you who donate to our Creating Educational Opportunities project. If it weren’t for you, so many students like Micaela would be unable to complete their primary school education.   

Micaela Ratzan, a sponsored student in Panabaj
Micaela Ratzan, a sponsored student in Panabaj
Scenes from ChukMuk
Scenes from ChukMuk's 6th grade graduation
Our sponsored graduates at ChukMuk Primary School
Our sponsored graduates at ChukMuk Primary School
Nov 4, 2014

Breaking the Silence on Reproductive Health

Students attend one of the sessions at Chukmuk
Students attend one of the sessions at Chukmuk

Pueblo a Pueblo’s Maternal Child Health program launched the Family Planning Champions project last year to help break the silence surrounding sexuality and reproductive health among rural women in Guatemala. But what began as informal one-on-one conversations between our trained community educators and their neighbors has now grown into widespread community discussions held in public and private institutions.

Over the past few months, our Champions have begun to collaborate with new partners to provide more local opportunities for women to learn about key topics in women’s health. Their first outreach events were held in collaboration with the coordinator of the Municipal Office for Women. Twenty-four women of all ages from Santiago Atitlan attended the trainings, which focused on reproductive health, family planning techniques and how to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy. Later in the month, Champions also led two workshops for the employees of the Rxiin Tnament health clinic on similar topics.

The most exciting opportunity for our Champions, however, was to provide sexual and reproductive health classes to adolescents in Chukmuk’s high school. In September three Champions led sessions for boys and girls across three grade levels, all aged 13 through 17 years old. They spoke about the physiology and anatomy of male and female reproductive systems, sexually transmitted diseases, and what steps to take to prevent health risks like cervical cancer.

Discussions like these are both unprecedented and of critical importance. In Guatemala, particularly in rural areas, topics related to sexual health are often avoided, and there is no nationwide curriculum to discuss health or sexual education within schools. As a result, the country has the one of the lowest rates of contraceptive usage and one of the highest fertility rates in Latin America.

Here at Pueblo a Pueblo, we are excited to expand our Family Planning Champions project and to use every outreach event as an opportunity to break the local silence on reproductive health issues.

Champions relaxing after a training
Champions relaxing after a training

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $15
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $75
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $1,000
    give
  • $7,000
    give
  • $15
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $75
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $1,000
    each month
    give
  • $7,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc. on GreatNonProfits.org.