Zimkids Orphan Trust

Zimkids Orphan Trust is a neighborhood-based safe haven for orphaned children in impossible circumstances. We are committed to ensuring that the children and their caregivers have access to food and medical care, as well as creative, recreational, vocational and educational opportunities and training in the tools essential for self-reliance so they can grow into productive, healthy adults who are literate, energized, assertive and ready to take initiative for themselves, their families and their community.
Mar 5, 2012

March, 2012 Zimkids Update

With US Ambassador at grant signing ceremony
With US Ambassador at grant signing ceremony

We at Zimkids are exhausted, but happy since we're moving ahead at a dizzying speed, thanks to the help of a growing number of wonderful supporters. The seniors, Tinashe and I have now finished the skeletons of all our new buildings and the roof structure. Next we will be installing the roofing, the floors and window panes then on to plumbing. Our Senior girls are now the first trained female construction workers in the country, and Foster has become a master, expert builder. 

 Once the roofs, floors and interior finish work is done, our local guardian angel, Mike Randall, will give the Seniors on-the-job training in plumbing. We've made a terrific new friend who is installing solar traffic lights in the city, and he has designed a solar system that will allow us to operate entirely off the grid. Obviously, that's a huge relief since it means that we will always have electricity - unlike most of the neighborhood, which is dark as much as 8 hours a day - but that also we will have no on-going utility costs. He plans to train the Seniors in solar installation as part of an Environmental Stewardship program he's beginning. 

 At that point, we'll be ready to begin our self-sustainability programs, our Computer Center/Internet Cafe and our market garden (which is being designed using drip irrigation and tunnel greenhouses to conserve water).

 Much of this has been made possible by two grants that we just received, one from the P&G Alumni for our Tech Center and the other from U.S. Embassy in Harare through the Ambassador's Fund and PEPFAR (the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief).  A high school student from California, Carly Bidner, is raising funds for our sports program.  And two Rotary clubs have expressed interest in assisting us with our solar installation.  Thanks to St. Raphael’s  in Fairbanks, Alaska for their Christmas Gifts.

 Five members of the USAP Program (the United States Achievers Program, which helps talented disadvantaged youth to find scholarships to U.S. universities) have now begun tutoring all our 3rd and 4th form students who are preparing for their high school graduation exams. They're extremely excited since there education has been so spotty and they have watched almost all of their brothers and sisters fail. 

 Obviously, we're continuing with our "normal" activities, distributing food, working with the children, taking children and their caregivers to our doctor. Dr. Maksimovic is about to conduct a workshop with our older kids to give them basic skills we all have - like taking temperature, blood pressure and ask the first medical questions needed when someone has a problem. 

 All in all, then, despite the normal problems of electricity, water and bureaucracy, we're thriving and excited about the future.

 We have one request as we move toward it (actually, we have many, but only one for this month): As we train all of our kids on computers, we'd like to collect as many computer games as possible, both educational and purely recreational. So if any of you have games - really, computer or not - gathering dust, please consider sharing them with us. You can write me at dennis@zimkids.com to make arrangements.

Raising gumpole to Resource Ctr roof
Raising gumpole to Resource Ctr roof
Roofing safe with cement at Tech Ctr
Roofing safe with cement at Tech Ctr
Happy Kids with gifts from Alaska
Happy Kids with gifts from Alaska
Tech Center built by our kids! pre-roofing
Tech Center built by our kids! pre-roofing
Mar 5, 2012

March 2012 Zimkids Update

With US Ambassador at grant signing ceremony
With US Ambassador at grant signing ceremony

We at Zimkids are exhausted, but happy since we're moving ahead at a dizzying speed, thanks to the help of a growing number of wonderful supporters. The seniors, Tinashe and I have now finished the skeletons of all our new buildings and the roof structure. Next we will be installing the roofing,  the floors and window panes then on to plumbing. Our Senior girls are now the first trained female construction workers in the country, and Foster has become a master, expert builder. 

 Once the roofs, floors and interior finish work is done, our local guardian angel, Mike Randall, will give the Seniors on-the-job training in plumbing. We've made a terrific new friend who is installing solar traffic lights in the city, and he has designed a solar system that will allow us to operate entirely off the grid. Obviously, that's a huge relief since it means that we will always have electricity - unlike most of the neighborhood, which is dark as much as 8 hours a day - but that also we will have no on-going utility costs. He plans to train the Seniors in solar installation as part of an Environmental Stewardship program he's beginning. 

 At that point, we'll be ready to begin our self-sustainability programs, our Computer Center/Internet Cafe and our market garden (which is being designed using drip irrigation and tunnel greenhouses to conserve water).

 Much of this has been made possible by two grants that we just received, one from the P&G Alumni for our Tech Center and the other from U.S. Embassy in Harare through the Ambassador's Fund and PEPFAR (the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief).  A high school student from California, Carly Bidner, is raising funds for our sports program.  And two Rotary clubs have expressed interest in assisting us with our solar installation.  Thanks to St. Raphael’s  in Fairbanks, Alaska for their Christmas Gifts.

 Five members of the USAP Program (the United States Achievers Program, which helps talented disadvantaged youth to find scholarships to U.S. universities) have now begun tutoring all our 3rd and 4th form students who are preparing for their high school graduation exams. They're extremely excited since there education has been so spotty and they have watched almost all of their brothers and sisters fail. 

 Obviously, we're continuing with our "normal" activities, distributing food, working with the children, taking children and their caregivers to our doctor. Dr. Maksimovic is about to conduct a workshop with our older kids to give them basic skills we all have - like taking temperature, blood pressure and ask the first medical questions needed when someone has a problem. 

 All in all, then, despite the normal problems of electricity, water and bureaucracy, we're thriving and excited about the future.

 We have one request as we move toward it (actually, we have many, but only one for this month): As we train all of our kids on computers, we'd like to collect as many computer games as possible, both educational and purely recreational. So if any of you have games - really, computer or not - gathering dust, please consider sharing them with us. You can write me at dennis@zimkids.com to make arrangements.

Raising gumpole to Resource Ctr roof
Raising gumpole to Resource Ctr roof
Roofing safe with cement at Tech Ctr
Roofing safe with cement at Tech Ctr
Happy Kids with gifts from Alaska
Happy Kids with gifts from Alaska
Tech Center built by our kids! pre-roofing
Tech Center built by our kids! pre-roofing
Jan 12, 2012

Zimkids Update January, 2012

Artist Shaka Ndlovu teaching Elder Sanele wall art
Artist Shaka Ndlovu teaching Elder Sanele wall art

ZimKids has been rocking and rolling over the past two months. All of the brickwork on the buildings for our new “home” is almost complete, and the roof structures are rising. Plastering has begun, and Zimbabwe now has its first two female plasterers, our very own Sithibisiwe and Thandiwe! The grounds have been landscaped with a dry garden of cacti and aloes. The paintings on the wall between us and the street have become such a local attraction that people constantly come by to admire and photograph them. Shaka Ndlovu is teaching our Elders who will teach our children how to paint wall art.The younger children have begun digging vegetable plots for their families. Students at Carmel, a local private school, raised $150 and bought us a solar cooker and some post and pans. We distributed glasses donated by an American medical researcher here on the Fullbright program. And thanks to the generosity of the Proctor and Gamble Alumni network, we’re in the process of purchasing a full solar array so that we can be independent of the crumbling electrical grid and operate without a monthly electric bill.

In terms of the building project, while the plastering team moves from building to building, the roof team hopes to have the buildings closed in by the end of February or early March. As we complete that work, the plumber will train our Seniors to connect the toilets to the sewer and the electrician will show us how to put in our wiring. We’ll still have a dozen small items to complete – putting the glass into the windows, polishing the floors, doing the final clean-up. But we’re on target to be done by the end of April.

As Tinashe and Dennis have worked with the Seniors at the building site, the Council of Elders have been continuing their wonderful programs with the younger children. Just this weekend, they began rehearsing with them for a special play for the Center opening!

Things are harder then ever here as prices continue to rise. Rents keep rising, and people now are paying $100 a month for two tiny rooms. Food prices for everything but vegetables are now well above what we pay in the U.S., and medical care is astronomically costly. We’ve managed to continue providing the safety net that was our first project and in December, Adrian Suskin, our ever-loyal guardian angel, sponsored a special food distribution. Our terrific doctor is still keeping people as healthy as possible when they live with water and electricity cut-offs and no money.

By the end of the year, we’re expecting that we’ll have an abundant garden and a functioning poultry project to help out our families and provide ZimKids with a bit of income. Once our solar panels are installed, we’ll begin networking our computers and training our young people so that we can open our very own Internet café and computer training center – the first one for miles around!

So, as we move into 2012, thank you again for all your support and encouragement. Every time officials stop by – from the community, the city, or from embassies – and admire what we’ve accomplished, we think with immense gratitude how far we have come because of the amazing generosity of our friends!

Foster, Tinashe and Dennis put up roof structure
Foster, Tinashe and Dennis put up roof structure
Gogo
Gogo's with their new glasses
Thandiwe and Sithibisiwe plastering
Thandiwe and Sithibisiwe plastering
First use of our new solar cooker
First use of our new solar cooker
Tinashe bolting gumpole to Tech center roof
Tinashe bolting gumpole to Tech center roof
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