Wuqu' Kawoq

Wuqu' Kawoq's mission is to address the barriers to excellent health care that the majority of Guatemala's indigenous Maya population face, including principally the lack of access to health care in their own languages. As such, Wuqu' Kawoq develops primary care and health programs within a larger context of community vitality, family stability,and Mayan language revitalization.
Mar 3, 2015

Every Step Counts Towards Ending Malnutrition

Chutinamit
Chutinamit

Dear Friends,

It is with your continued and considerate support that we are able to work so hard to eradicate malnutrition and provide a healthier and happier future, one baby at a time. Even though  Guatemala continues to maintain one of the highest levels of malnutrition in the world, our team at Wuqu' Kawoq works tirelessly day after day to ensure that progress is being made in our Child Nutrition program.

As a thank you for all of your help, we invite you to take a closer look into a day with some of our Wuqu' Kawoq workers. Without your help, we wouldn't be able to do what we love doing - serving our communities and inspiring change.

"Upon arriving in Chutinamit, we were immediately greeted with loud music, little kids in costumes, and plenty of smiling faces. Unbeknownst to me at the time, the children were from a local school who were putting on a dance for Carnaval, which is celebrated with bright and colorful costumes and masks, and painted cascarones (eggshells) with confetti.

I asked a woman standing next to me more about what the tradition symbolized, and she simply stated, “It is a day for the kids to be happy.” A beautiful sentiment, and certainly one that Wuqu’ Kawoq is striving towards. Meanwhile, a couple of feet away from the Carnival festivities, Yoli and German were busy weighing and measuring children inside one of the houses. After taking the measurements, Yoli spoke with the mothers about healthy eating for their children, such as incorporating more fruits and vegetables in their diet. This part is especially critical, since education is a lacking component within the communities we work.

Our next stop was in Nuevo Progreso, where we visited two homes. Again, Yoli and German took the measurements of the children to track the progress of their growth. So far, the children we have seen have been doing fairly well. At the second home in Nuevo Progreso, German informs me that this particular child has not been growing as expected. Because of this, Yoli has begun giving education classes with the mother to explain what types of beneficial changes can be made in the child’s diet and lifestyle. As stated before, education is a crucial part in informing the mothers about proper nutrition, while also giving the mothers a sense of autonomy in improving her child’s health.

Our final destination was Chichimuch, where we met with a beautiful baby girl who has been doing very well with her growth. After taking her measurements, we were dismayed to find out that her growth worsened slightly. Yoli and German sat down with the mother to find out the cause, whether her child had been sick or had not been eating as much as usual. Though there was nothing unusual in the child’s health or eating habits, Yoli gave suggestions on different ways to prepare fruits, for example mixing mangoes into a smoothie, so that the growing baby could eat more.

It was a long day, but a typical one for Wuqu’ Kawoq workers. The fight towards improving child malnutrition is a slow and arduous one, and each improvement in a child’s growth is significant. Each improvement means a step further in providing a healthier and happier future, a future where every day is a day for the kids to be happy.”

We are working to #EndMalnutrition and #GrowGuatemala to transform the future of Guatemala. Thank you for your continued support of our work. 

With gratitude,
Anne Kraemer Diaz
Executive Director

Yoli speaking with a mother in Chutinamit
Yoli speaking with a mother in Chutinamit
Nuevo Progresso
Nuevo Progresso
A mother and her child in Nuevo Progreso
A mother and her child in Nuevo Progreso
German and Yoli in Chichimuch
German and Yoli in Chichimuch
A mother and her child in Chichimuch
A mother and her child in Chichimuch
Dec 4, 2014

Data Collection and Training Creates Healthier Moms and Babies

Making a Home Visit for Data Collection
Making a Home Visit for Data Collection

Dear Friends,

It has been an exciting several months. Together with our midwives, we have worked to develop a high quality training environment that provides continuing education and bolsters professional identity. The program is unique in many ways, but especially in terms of cultural sensitivity, Mayan language-fluent instructors, and the use of learning methods suitable to an adult low-literate audience.

The program has grown significantly and now provides training to midwives from five municipalities, providing health services to a catchment area of nearly 200,000 persons. As geographic scope has expanded, so has the projects reputation and authority.Our training program has gone very well and we were able to train 40 midwives in 2014 between January and June on how to manage emergency hemorraging situations for mothers. This directly saves mothers lives as hemorraging is one of the major reasons for maternal deaths. 

Another important aspect of our work is data collection. Data collection with midwives and mothers helps us to understand the situations that mothers and midwives face during deliveraies and prenatal care. With this data we can better understand how to train our midwives and provide better services to our mothers.

We are very excited to report that prelimary data from interviewing 25 midwives, show that in 7 instances, the midwives were able to apply their knowledge they learned in training about hemorraging to save mothers' lives! 

We are contintuing to collect data through December and we are excited to share more results with you in 2015. 

Thank you for your continued support for our exciting work in rural Guatemala that is saving lives!

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions at anne@wuqukawoq.org or check out our website: www.wuqukawoq.org 

Wishing you safe and happy holidays,

Anne Kraemer Diaz
Executive Director

 

 

              

Training Session on Hemorraging
Training Session on Hemorraging

Links:

Dec 2, 2014

Understanding Life as a Diabetic in Guatemala

Mynor
Mynor

Dear Friends,

During the holiday season we often think of those who need our help, but do we really understand their situation? 

I want to share a story with you, so you can understand what life is like in rural Guatemala, living with diabetes.

Mynor is a young man, only 36 years old, yet he suffers from severe diabetes. Living in rural areas, he has not had access to good treatment and most of all he has not received good education about his illness. During 2014, he lost 50 pounds and could not walk well due to horrible nerve damage that was caused by his uncontrolled diabetes. 

As is the case in Guatemala, many people search for care in many places before they are able to receive good diabetic care and sadly many are unable to find good care at all. Mynor came to us as a final resort, he has been searching for years and had tried many medications and natural remedies to cure his diabetes or make him feel better. Sadly, he purchased items he could afford, but was never able to afford the appropriate treatments to help him feel better. 

When he came to our clinic, our team quickly saw that Mynor needed help! He was unable to work, unable to help his family with costs, he was barely able to walk and he was extremely malnourished. Our team explained that he needed treatment with insulin and intensive management of his nerve damage, to protect his kidneys, and control his blood pressure. He also needed to immediately gain weight to better his overall health and get his diabetes under control so his diabetes function could hopefully return to normal.

 At only 36 years old, Mynor was being torn apart by diabetes, however with our donors support, we have been able to help Mynor down the road towards better health.

Thank you for your continued support of our diabetes programs! We look forward to counting on your support in 2015!

Happy Holidays!

 

Measuring a patient
Measuring a patient's glucose level

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