Fly The Phoenix

Fly the Phoenix believes that education, as well as daily food, are basic human rights. In order to combat the imbalances of these rights, we are creating sustainable, 25-year cycle, educational community programs. These are funded by our local income-initiatives, challenges and international donations through our registered charity, Fly The Phoenix.
Apr 20, 2012

School Granted Official Status

After years of legalities, form filling and  jumping through hoops, we received the news that the “Pájaro de Fuego” school was finally granted official status. This new status has some big consequences; the students will be able to receive official qualifications in the school, rather than having to use valuable funds to send them to national school to receive their certificates. Phoenix, with some funds raised through the GVI Charitable Trust, now pays for 8 local teacher salaries, most of whom have come through the ranks on our projects over the years and all of whom we have helped through teaching college.

Towards the end of March 2012, all 240 children took their first official exams and with most of the grades coming through, we are seeing an incredible high average of marks from sciences, maths, Spanish, English and written Kaqchikel, which before, was unavailable. With the majority of children averaging over 80%, this puts them in the top 10% of Guatemalan schools. In Guatemala, only 70% of children finish Primary education (according to UNESCO data), with girls 8.4% less likely to finish that boys (SEGEPLAN). Of those children taking exams, 12.5% will fail the grade and have to retake the year, often leading to them dropping out altogether.

Thanks to the continuous presence of our volunteers we are able to run reinforcement lessons for those children who a falling behind, as well as teaching and assisting with the kinder kids, whose need for more attention is critical. It marks a watershed in history, slowly breaking the circle, whereby ex-students are employed to teach, moving one step closer to self-sustainability.  

Apr 19, 2012

Promoting Creativity

Throughout the majority of schools in South America, fostering creativity in students is either not present in, or not a priority of the curriculum.  If you walk into a normal classroom, you will see students doing a lot of copying off of the blackboard.  When these same students are asked to write a story about a cat named Jinx, they stare at you blankly, because they have not been trained to work the right side of their brains.  We have been working in local schools in Peru for the last 6 years, sending volunteers into the classrooms to support the local teachers.         

In order to get out of the cycle of abject poverty in these towns, the team in Peru believes that the children need to be trained to think independently.  As Walter Lippman once said, “When all think alike, then no one is thinking!”  With this in mind, the staff and volunteers at GVI Phoenix Peru took it upon themselves to start introducing the concepts of creativity and imagination to the classroom.  This has been a multi-pronged venture.  First, they redesigned the gym and art curriculum for all six grades of primary school.  In this new curriculum, the children now have weeks of theatre lessons, weeks of dance lessons, and more challenging art projects.  Next, the team in Peru took it upon themselves to change the environment that the children are working in to make it more conducive to new ideas and sparks of imagination.  In March, the volunteers finished painting the entire Inicial (elementary) classroom with fanciful birds, unicorns, lizards, and other mythical creatures, and the kids can’t get enough.  The team also started reading time with the children, and will read one page of a story book, and then have the children create the ending for the story.  It’s a fantastic exercise for them to learn how to think independently. 

The local teachers in Arequipa are overwhelmed with high numbers of students and extremely low resources.  Being able to support them in this way has been an incredible experience for. The teachers themselves have now started incorporating some of these imaginative techniques into their daily teaching, which is fantastic news, because it means this program is gaining a level of sustainability, which is the ultimate goal.  

Mar 13, 2012

Charity Challenge in March

Kids at play in Peru
Kids at play in Peru

Later on this March, a group of challengers will be taking part in a two-day charity challenge to raise funds for our projects, which are situated on the outskirts of Arequipa, Peru. 

Unusually heavy rains devastated many families in the area, which are home to many of the children where we work, providing free education. Under normal circumstances these families would not be able to afford this education for their children. 

The aim of this challenge is to enable us to put funds together to assist families whose homes and livelihoods were destroyed at the beginning of the year.

donate now:

An anonymous donor is matching all new monthly recurring donations. Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $35
    give
  • $105
    give
  • $175
    give
  • $350
    give
  • $524
    give
  • $525
    give
  • $1,050
    give
  • $1,575
    give
  • $35
    each month
    give
  • $105
    each month
    give
  • $175
    each month
    give
  • $350
    each month
    give
  • $524
    each month
    give
  • $525
    each month
    give
  • $1,050
    each month
    give
  • $1,575
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?