St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Our mission is to find cures and save children with cancer and other catastrophic disease through research and treatment. We have treated children from all 50 states and from around the world. No family ever pays St. Jude for anything.
Dec 4, 2013

We want a 90% survival rate by 2020

Fundraisers at Work Help St. Jude Save Lives
Fundraisers at Work Help St. Jude Save Lives

Survival rates for childhood cancer of 80 percent are great, but with support from you and others like you, we’re working to drive it to 90% by 2020.

How do your donations help?

  • Thanks to donors, no family ever pays St. Jude for anything. Care, housing, transportation, meals—the list of services we provide to our families is unequalled. But it is for one purpose: To ensure the very best outcome possible for every child.
  • At St. Jude, donor dollars help fuel the groundbreaking research that leads to pioneering care and treatments for childhood cancer and other deadly diseases.

How is St. Jude making a difference for sick children?

  • Every child saved at St. Jude means children saved around the world—a direct result of cutting-edge research and treatment that set the standard in treating childhood cancers. And our discoveries are shared freely with doctors and scientists all over the world.
  • St. Jude developed protocols that have helped push overall survival rates for childhood cancers from less than 20 percent, when the hospital opened in 1962, to 80 percent today.
  • St. Jude is the first and only pediatric cancer center to be designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute.
  • St. Jude has embarked on an unprecedented effort to sequence the pediatric cancer genome and to identify the genetic changes that give rise to some of the world's deadliest childhood cancers. Read more.

How are donations used?

  • During the past five years, 81 cents of every dollar received has supported the research and treatment at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
  • It costs $1.9 million a day to operate St. Jude, and public donations provide more than 75 percent of our funding.

To fundraise at your work, you may visit www.StJudeAtWork.org

Links:

Sep 12, 2013

Ethan's St. Jude Story

 
Ethan

5 years old

 

DIAGNOSIS:

Ethan was found to suffer from pineoblastoma in June 2012.

 

ETHAN’S ST. JUDE STORY:

These days, when Ethan’s mom cues up her Zumba workout in the living room, she soon fi nds that she’s not dancing alone.  Ethan, her 5-year-old son, has appeared right next to her in front of the TV screen. He loves learning and repeating the dance steps, he loves the music and he loves his mom.  As his mom looks down at Ethan happily stamping and sliding his little feet, she is grateful for many things. But her heart swells with gratitude for two blessings in particular: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and mother’s intuition.

When Ethan was 3 years old, he began vomiting, became lethargic and lost interest in food and play. Doctors chalked it up to allergies or possibly a virus. But when his symptoms failed to subside, his mother, a nurse, took him to the emergency room. There, doctors theorized that Ethan was having migraines.

“When we left the ER, I was in tears,” Ethan’s mom remembers.  “I knew in my heart that something wasn’t right. I knew it was something else, that it was serious.”

At her insistence, Ethan’s pediatrician sent him to the local children’s hospital. That’s where a CT scan revealed that Ethan suffered from a rare and dangerous brain tumor known as pineoblastoma.

Ethan was slated for brain surgery. But prior to that date, “people just kept telling us about St. Jude, and St. Jude kept coming up,” recalls his mom.

She didn’t yet know that St. Jude has the largest pediatric brain tumor research program in the country and the world’s best survival rates. She just knew St. Jude was where Ethan needed to be.

At St. Jude, Ethan first underwent chemotherapy to shrink the cancerous tumor in his brain, then surgery to remove the tumor, followed by radiation therapy and more chemotherapy.

Ethan is now cancer-free and returns to St. Jude every three months for checkups.

The lifesaving interventions were hard on Ethan’s body. He was often fatigued and didn’t want to eat.  Receiving physical, speech, and occupational therapies at St. Jude helped Ethan recover.

Now, Ethan shows off his line-dancing moves at every opportunity. He also loves to play his toy instruments and practice writing his ABCs, and he is excited about pre-kindergarten this year. And his mom loves it when he joins in on her Zumba routine, when she can bask in just how far he’s come.

Jun 10, 2013

Mae's Story

Mae, 6 years old

Diagnosis: Mae was found to suffer from Wilms tumor in October 2010.

Mae’s story: Mae is a girly girl. She loves dolls, the color pink and glitter – lots and lots of glitter. On this particular day, Mae goes through a large box full of dress up clothes. There are princess dresses, fairy wings and dance costumes to sort through. Mae finds what she’s looking for, a frilly pink dress full of sparkles. She puts on the dress and a bejeweled tiara, then poses in front of the mirror, a princess ready for the ball.

In 2010, Mae’s family was devastated to learn that she suffered from Wilms tumor, a solid tumor of the kidney. She received treatment at a local hospital, which included surgery to remove the tumor and her left kidney, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

But in March 2012, Mae’s cancer returned. This time, her family turned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for her continuing treatment. Mae’s mother grew up in Memphis and knew about the hospital.

“St. Jude has a wealth of knowledge about this type of cancer,” said Mae’s mother. “That’s where we wanted to be.”

At St. Jude, Mae’s treatment included chemotherapy and radiation therapy. “The care at St. Jude is so comprehensive,” said her mother. “It’s so team-oriented.”

While undergoing treatment at St. Jude, Mae became friends with other patients undergoing treatment for Wilms tumor. “We didn’t have this community the first time around,” her mom said. “Mae’s St. Jude friends can be there for her in a way I can’t.”

Mae is done with treatment and now visits St. Jude for regular checkups. She looks forward to coming back to the hospital so she can see her friends and her doctors and nurses. Mae, who has two sisters, loves paper dolls, making beaded jewelry and playing with Barbies.

Recently, Mae participated in the kindergarten graduation at St. Jude. She donned a cap and gown and beamed brightly when she received her diploma. She’s looking forward to starting first grade this fall.

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