HANDS AROUND THE WORLD

HANDS AROUND THE WORLD seeks to help vulnerable children around the world, encouraging enthusiastic and well-prepared volunteers to offer practical help, skill-sharing, support and friendship.
Feb 20, 2015

Special Update February 2015

Geoff Burnett
Geoff Burnett

It is very sad to have to record the death of a good friend, and now we must remember the passing of Geoff Burnett, for many years our project co-ordinator for the HATW projects in Benin, West Africa, and a tireless fighter for the disadvantaged.

He will be sadly missed, but happily the orphanage he established will be named 'Chez Papa Geoff' in his memory. May he rest in peace.

His funeral and a celebration of his life will be on Tuesday 24 February.

We very much hope to be able to continue his work, and are delighted to report that Nigel England, ably supported by Dick Wheelock, will help ensure a future for this link by acting as our new Project Co-ordinator. Although Nigel has not visited Benin before, he has building skills and experience, has been a HATW volunteer at an orphans' project in Kenya and has many years' experience of working with children in care in the UK.

Of course we look forward too to your ongoing support and help. Thank you.

Best wishes,

David

Feb 18, 2015

February 2015 Update

Nelly and Friends
Nelly and Friends

It was great once again to visit the DCC in Kenya and some of their associated schools, including Athi, and learn more of their work. An excellent and helpful visit for 2 of us from HATW; I particularly enjoyed meeting Nelly who is now 11 and in excellent health after much surgery - she looks very bright, active and happy. Here she is (above, second from the right):

I enjoyed the chance to 'recharge my Africa batteries' and realise once again the scale of the needs there. There were contrasts and some anomalies as usual, and I came away with questions but also greater understanding I hope!

I was astonished to see the kids at Athi wash and use antibacterial spray on their hands before lunch (and not a new bottle brought out for our benefit!).

There was good speedy broadband at the DCC, but lots of stigma and ignorance around disability and its management in the community.

We enjoyed our welcome at the mission hospital guest house, including the wonderful early-morning singing from the chapel next to us. We had no health problems and only one very brief power cut!

(One other highlight for me was an enforced stop on the main Meru – Nairobi highway to allow 6 elephants to cross the road!)

Oliver Kirimi the DCC director met us off the shuttle minibus, settled us into our lovely house, and generally hosted and looked after us well all week. He is genuine, serious, honest and keen to get things done. He introduced me to Lydia who is the Chair of the Board. She is a gentle, quiet lady who works in the accounts department of the hospital and is confined to a wheelchair. 

Our first visit was to Twale School in the valley, Meru side. A primary school with secondary across the field, it has just opened a unit for 12 children with disabilities this term. They are looked after by 2 very enthusiastic special-needs teachers and accommodated in a wooden hut attached to a classroom block, which has a lumpy mud floor, half a dozen desks and absolutely no equipment. Most of the children have cerebral palsy or mixed issues, but one has quite severe autism and needs very specialised care. It was a useful insight, and highlighted the need for appropriate buildings, stimulating toys etc.. We were also told about a sad lack of parental interest and support. Many of the children need assessment but it is said to be too costly for them to come to Maua. Not sure if this is somewhere we could help in future?

Next visit was to Turuu children’s home and orthopaedic workshop, part of a Catholic Mission. They can make and repair limb prostheses and repair wheel chairs, have a training therapy room also. Julius the DCC orthopaedic technician is attending there for training, Anthony DCC physio and Norah DCC OT also visit. (These 3 are called the DCC Rehab Team). For reference, an above-knee hinged prosthesis from Turuu costs about £500.

The DCC building looks good and the Guernsey Overseas Aid funded work has made a significant difference. There is still some equipment on order but due imminently. But they are obviously still very short of space and I encouraged them to think about how to change that. If funds were available, it seems the workshop could be extended forwards quite a way into the yard, allowing the therapy room to be extended into the back of the workshop storage area.

We met with each of the rehab team individually. All are young. Enthusiastic, motivated and working well together as a team, we liked them. They appear knowledgeable but quiet. A number of workshop hand tools we had brought were well received. We also gave some knitted kids' jumpers and 2 first aid kits which had been donated. I asked Norah what her dream for Athi would be, and she said she would like to go more frequently (currently one Friday a month) and concentrate on training and encouraging staff and mothers there to undertake daily therapy for the kids. She is greatly looking forward to the OT visit in March to help her with this dream. All reinforced the view that often parents are not keen to help their children with disabilities.

We met Thomas Akini the DCC Social Development worker who is responsible for the self help groups and groups of people living with disabilities. This is obviously a much more major part of the work of the DCC than I had realised, is very clearly defined and well-organised, with weekly minuted meetings and fines for those who do not turn up, and is growing rapidly. Micro-finance is obviously very popular! One session was training in soap making. I have encouraged Julie when she visits to talk to Thomas to learn more about this programme. Maybe Athi can learn to raise funds with these techniques?

We met and were invited to dinner with Revs Jim and Sue Monroe. They are from the US, he is the hospital CEO and she looks after ex-pat visitors. Fortunately I was able to negotiate free accommodation for Julie G (accountant) and Lydia B (occupational therapist) who will spend the month of March there, and for future volunteers.

Next visit was to Njia School, a special school for mentally challenged and hearing impaired children. They have a good audiology unit and a trained teacher and refer for ENT help. No hearing aids though. The school may become just for the hearing impaired in future. They have built a small clinic outside the gate which is supposed to generate income but doesn't really, although it is seen as a valuable local resource.

We also visited Athiru Gaiti school, just down the road 10 minutes from Maua. It has an established special unit with a great teacher, good clean classroom with some toys and equipment, including a stocked 'play shop' and an indoor garden. The outside play area however is difficult and rough with broken swings but a usable slide. There is a basic dormitory for boys and one for girls. Very little water, and the lined fish pond, although stocked with fish was all but dry. Water is their main problem. A dining hall built last year with community development funds needs decorating and furnishing. Funds too have dried up. I thought this might be a project our supporters would like to help.

After lunch with the hospital board, we went to Athi School. Esther the head was keen to see us and we were happy with what we saw. The buildings looked clean and well cared for. Water is still a problem, the storage tank has a tap now but it leaks, very little comes through the pipeline from the forest. The tea factory next door will unfortunately not allow them a hose pipe but they do go each day and fill jerry cans there. 104 children are enrolled but often fewer than 90 turn up. 60 live in. Florence and Emily are still there, and Florence talked in English and led the singing of one song. Although she looks in good health, I thought there is a deep sadness about her. 

In the dining hall there are tables and 150+ plastic chairs, and a display table for the bead necklaces the children make as therapy. The 'therapy room' is a partially-built structure attached at one end to the back of the dining room, and at the other end to one of the dormitories. Funds are needed for window, doors, roof etc.. 

Oliver feels that completion of the therapy room would lead to more therapist visits and possibly an in-house OT or physio appointment. Esther is keen on getting it finished. She is also very keen for more classroom space. Currently she has 4 – and one is just an old wooden hut. This is hopelessly inadequate and infilling between the dormitory, therapy room and the dining hall could create another classroom. 

Finally we visited a 9 year old girl at home. She has CP, has a shaped sitting frame which the family do not use, normally she lies on the sofa and doesn't go out anywhere. She seems alert and communicates with sounds and expression when elevated so that she can see what is going on round her. She is obviously regarded as low in the pecking order within the family, although the parents did seem kind and interested. The physio gave her some exercise and arranged for her to come to Maua for assessment and discussion of schooling. This did seem like a good indicator of the current situation in the community – lots still to do for individual children and in changing attitudes, but interested people trying to make a difference. 

I'm sure there's lots else we could do in future, but encouraging self-help is important too. We need to work together for the benefit of all the children.

Thank you for your past support and encouragement. Please help us carry on as there is much to do!

Lunchtime at Athi School
Lunchtime at Athi School
Athi Therapy Room needs finishing urgently!
Athi Therapy Room needs finishing urgently!
Florence has brittle bone disease
Florence has brittle bone disease
Just kids!
Just kids!
Jan 20, 2015

January 2015 Update

Carpenters Wilson and Dan in the Workshop
Carpenters Wilson and Dan in the Workshop

Since returning home, the Hands around the World team has followed up, consolidating the work that has been done in getting the Vocational Training Centre opened.

The major step was appointing Wilson Phiri and his wife as the centre managers with full responsibility for the tools, the security and the cleaning of the rooms. Wilson has also been appointed as the 'in house' carpenter.

Chief Mnukwa has supported this appointment and HATW will support Wilson and his family for the next 12 months. At the end of 2015 the situation will be reviewed.

Wilson has been allowed 3 months to build all the shelving and cupboards needed in the classrooms to ensure they are secure and that everything has it’s place. The sewing machines in particular need to be kept out of the dust.

Another massive step forward has been the meetings and discussions between HATW and ZOE. ZOE is a charity that is working in Zambia with orphans. They are very well established and a marvellous manager Stephen oversees the ZOE projects.

I met with John Hunt the founder of ZOE and, as both charities are working in the same area, we have agreed to work closely together. As Stephen has transport he has kindly agreed to help us by acting as an unofficial “postman” liaising with Wilson and others in Mnukwa.

The next major projects are

- to set up support mechanisms for some of the older students at the school so they can stay in education and

- to support the start of the building of a maternity ward next to the existing health centre.

HATW will be working with ZOE on this new building.

Thank you for your support and encouragement!

 

 

 

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