Maison de la Gare

Maison de la Gare's mission is to achieve integration of the begging talibe street children into formal schooling and productive participation in Senegalese society. Tens of thousands of talibe children beg on the streets of Senegal for 6 to 10 hours each day for their food and for money to give the "teacher" or Marabout who controls them. They live in unconscionable conditions in "daaras", without access to running water, rudimentary hygiene or nurture, often without shelter and subject to severe abuse. Human Rights Watch published a widely distributed description of this situation in 2010, "Off the Backs of the Children". Maison de la Gare is acting with t...
Dec 27, 2013

French Volunteers Tackle Educating Talibe children

Jenny and Jerome teaching in MDG
Jenny and Jerome teaching in MDG's classrooms

Education program

Maison de la Gare Saint Louis is a refuge. This was our first impression on entering this place, full of color and greenery, located in the heart of the city but away from its trials. Passing through its doors, the talibé become kids again. They feel safe enough there to dare to set aside for a few hours their begging bowl of rice for their Marabout and to let go to play and laugh, before having to rejoin the hard life of the daaras.

In fact, we quickly realized that Maison de la Gare is more than a refuge, aspiring also to be a place of education. How to bring some education to children whose lives are so different from ours? We tried to find the answer to this question during our stay and, for us, this answer takes many forms and remains open.

We started with the most obvious form of education: what we provide in class. Like other volunteers before us, we taught the children mathematics and French. However, we learned that the most difficult and most important task is not teaching the material, but it is to give the children the desire to come back to class the next day, to be diligent and, for the older talibés, to understand the link between coming to class and their future lives as adults.

Respect for their environment and others seemed to us to be an essential starting point. For this, we tried to establish several rules such as picking up litter on the ground, not fighting, and respecting the schedules which we posted around the center. Our aim was to provide benchmarks and teach them some rules of life in society. However, it was difficult to impose constraints as these were often misunderstood initially by children whose religious education and life are already so difficult, compounded by the language barrier.

Our idea about the role of a volunteer at Maison de la Gare was in part to provide an opening for the children - particularly the older ones - to the world beyond Saint Louis and Senegal, to help them to come to believe in the possibility of a future other than becoming Marabouts themselves.

Very quickly, we realized that it was also important to take time to teach the children the basics: washing themselves. This may seem obvious, but we came to understand that washing and knowing why we wash are not innate in children, much less so when these children live on the streets left to themselves without educational models. We organized showering for them, especially younger ones, and taught them how to use soap and to lather the body properly.

Through our little time in the daaras where the children live, we discovered their living conditions beyond Maison de la Gare and the streets of the city. In fact, only some of Saint Louis' talibé children come regularly to Maison de la Gare; these are the ones who manage "least badly " in the situation. Many other talibé children fend for themselves on the streets of Saint Louis with only occasional exposure to staff and volunteers from Maison de la Gare providing first aid in their daaras. This time in the daaras was difficult for us to handle emotionally.  This is where the magnitude of the task the Maison de la Gare is trying to accomplish really hits you. Another thing struck us forcefully here ... many of these children have totally lost their identity. They can't remember either their family name or the name of their village. The support that we were able to provide as volunteers for a short period seems very meagre in face of how much work needs to be done. We were left with two mixed feelings: refusing to be discouraged, and regretting that we couldn't do more.

Being in contact with these children gave us a great deal, even if we had to keep a certain distance in order to best help them. A look, a smile from them, and we're off again. They are amazing, so brave ... this rich experience brings us back to reality with a glaring reminder of the many privileges we enjoy at home.

Finally, we have had a glimpse of Senegalese Africa, its culture and its people that we have discovered for the first time. We met children, men and women, appreciated and enjoyed many of them and especially admired one of them, Issa, the president of Maison de la Gare who devotes himself body and soul to the talibé street children, with courage and humility. However, a single man no matter how strong or willing cannot bear alone the burden imposed on these Senegalese children.

We are happy to have been able to contribute in this struggle but so much remains to be done, and we end with a loud plea for anyone who would be willing to come and give their support in turn.

Jerome playing with children in their daara
Jerome playing with children in their daara
Jenny with tallibe children in MDG
Jenny with tallibe children in MDG's center
Jerome with a Maison de la Gare soccer team
Jerome with a Maison de la Gare soccer team
Jenny animates an obstacle course in MDG center
Jenny animates an obstacle course in MDG center
Jerome and Jenny with special friends
Jerome and Jenny with special friends

Links:

Dec 6, 2013

A Home for Talibe Children in Transition

Older talibes leaving their daara, needing a home
Older talibes leaving their daara, needing a home

Maison de la Gare's newest project - Please support us

Since Maison de la Gare's welcome center in Saint Louis opened its doors to the talibé children in late 2010, and addition of the infirmary in 2011, the center has become a second home to hundreds of children and a beacon of hope to 1000s more.  Our needs have evolved, and we now seek to complete the center with a new building that will help us to address three continuing problems:

  • Supporting integration of talibés who have become too old for the daaras - Kalidou, Abdoulaye, Mamadou and Arouna in the above photo are examples of talibé children who have grown up in Maison de la Gare's programs and are now ready to move on from their daaras.  We need to find a way to accommodate them while they complete their schooling or become established with small businesses or other employment.
  • Transitional accommodation for talibés in crisis - We regularly take charge of talibé children whom we have found sleeping on the streets at night, on the run from their daaras.  Working with the local office of the Ministry of Justice, we care for these children while arrangements are made for reintegrating them in their daaras, returning them to their home villages, or otherwise.  We need a place where they can be safely sheltered for a period of several days to several weeks.
  • Kitchen for food preparation - We need a food preparation space with a sink, an oven and counters to help us feed the talibé children whom we serve every day, with better nutrition and hygiene.  Our food is currently prepared in our office or a workshop, locations which are clearly not suited to this purpose.

To resolve these problems, we propose to use the west end of our centre next to the classrooms, which is now undeveloped.  Our vision is to build there a two-story building with a kitchen, apartments for older talibés and a dormitory for talibés in crisis.  We will define this project in detail, with full costing, over the coming months.  We are seeking financial support from every possible source to make it possible.

We have added two new donation categories for this project, and hope that you will consider helping to make it possible with your donations.


Arouna in school, and where he sleeps in his daara
Arouna in school, and where he sleeps in his daara
Run-away talibes found in "night runs"
Run-away talibes found in "night runs"
Preparing food on the floor of the center
Preparing food on the floor of the center's office
The project site within Maison de la Gare
The project site within Maison de la Gare's center

Links:

Nov 15, 2013

MDG Through the Eyes of an American Volunteer

Madison with her pictures of talilbe children
Madison with her pictures of talilbe children

Maison de la Gare's Heath Care and Hygiene Program

The inharmonious mumbling hum and smell of dirt and poor hygiene have become familiar to my senses.  As we set foot into each daara, the next resembles the last.  This became my reality over my three months volunteering with Maison de la Gare.

I was certain that my experience in Senegal would provide me with a unique viewpoint, but the scene unfolding before my eyes was surreal.  It may have taken a few days, but soon I was reassured that I was in the right place.  My initial feelings of fear and uncertainty quickly changed.  Instead I was spurred into action.  It became a necessity to help these young boys as much as I was able.  

I have been skeptical about the value of international aid, which is often tied to the interests of the donor country.  However, in volunteering with Maison de la Gare I witnessed the positive effects that international financial support can have.  I came to realize that no political strings were attached to the funding that this organization receives from international NGOs and other donors.  This allows Maison de la Gare to work effectively without fear of governmental influence.  

Maison de la Gare is making great efforts to stop the inhuman treatment of the begging talibé street children.  With only a small staff and global volunteers, its impact on the community is immense.  The organization works towards integrating talibé children into formal education and into the community while providing physical and emotional support.  Issa Kouyaté, the founder and president of Maison de la Gare who quickly became one of my greatest role models, is totally committed to improving the lives of the talibés.  I was inspired by his work, consistently embodying the hope and passion he wants to spread.  

Maison de la Gare has established an environment where health care, sanitation, emotional support and opportunities are made possible for these young boys.  Their center has a library, garden, health center, classrooms, showers, and workshops.  Bright hibiscus flowers crawl up the side of buildings that have been vibrantly painted.  Intricate and beautiful child-focussed murals surround the walls.

My days would begin with assembling first aid kits with sufficient materials to provide children with basic health care.  Common injuries include foot wounds due to lack of proper footwear, and infected head wounds.  Most could be treated with our first aid supplies.  Our small team of staff members and volunteers would walk or take taxis to nearby daaras, visiting two or three each day.  

Around five in the evening, talibé children would begin trickling into Maison de la Gare’s center.  Maison de la Gare continues to emphasize the importance of basic hygiene.  For most, the center's facilities provide their only opportunity to bathe their bodies.  Many talibés can go weeks without bathing, causing easily preventable skin irritations and infections.  Once showered, the boys are able to participate in activities such as playing soccer and other games, creating arts and crafts, reading books, and watering the garden.  Beginner and intermediate French classes are offered.  Once each child has washed their hands they are given a nutritious baguette, which may be their only dinner.

In one of my experiences, a large cluster of talibés sat before us as we treated an extremely contagious case of eye infection that had spread to 30 to 40 boys.  Unfortunately, we had only treated roughly half our patients when suddenly the remaining boys dispersed.  Their marabout had ordered them to return to the streets to resume begging. 

Throughout my experience with Maison de la Gare, the talibé children amazed me each and every day.  Despite the conditions they were are living in, the children still found the ability to smile and be happy.

In the United States, nothing is celebrated more than freedom.  But freedom is not a right; it is a responsibility.  Everyone on this planet should have an equal opportunity to achieve a quality of life including good healthcare, adequate housing, proper nutrition and emotional support.  We all must share in this responsibility.  I fully support the work of Issa Kouyaté and Maison de la Gare, but for the future my hope is that such organizations will no longer be needed.  

Madison with her Senegalese host family
Madison with her Senegalese host family
With MDG vision for the talibes: I am the future!
With MDG vision for the talibes: I am the future!
Treating a talibe youth injured in a soccer match
Treating a talibe youth injured in a soccer match
At play in MDG center, with talibes and volunteers
At play in MDG center, with talibes and volunteers
Teaching outdoor class in MDG center
Teaching outdoor class in MDG center
Madison animating games on "Talibe Day"
Madison animating games on "Talibe Day"

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