Maison de la Gare

Maison de la Gare's mission is to achieve integration of the begging talibe street children into formal schooling and productive participation in Senegalese society. Tens of thousands of talibe children beg on the streets of Senegal for 6 to 10 hours each day for their food and for money to give the "teacher" or Marabout who controls them. They live in unconscionable conditions in "daaras", without access to running water, rudimentary hygiene or nurture, often without shelter and subject to severe abuse. Human Rights Watch published a widely distributed description of this situation in 2010, "Off the Backs of the Children". Maison de la Gare is acting with t...
Apr 30, 2014

GlobalGiving meets the stars of Maison de la Gare!

Some of the boys playing before class
Some of the boys playing before class

Paige is GlobalGiving's Champion for Customer Bliss in our office in Washington, DC. During a trip to Senegal, she had the chance to visit some of GlobalGiving's projects. Here is her postcard from the field. 

I had been in Senegal for 2 weeks and everywhere I went, not matter the size of the city, I met Talibe boys. It breaks your heart to see the kids begging, but even more so how natural it is to miss them. Talibe are part of the Senegalese scenery.

Upon my arrival in Saint Louis, Issa, the charismatic, superhero leader of this project, greeted me and led me to the beautiful haven that is Maison de la Gare. It was just around the time the boys start streaming in from the street, and the home was slowly filling with wrestling, cleaning, and giggling adolescent boys. And that’s when it hits you! These are the same boys tugging on your dress and sleeves around the country. Now, in the Maison, they’re no longer part of the scenery.

Like any good superhero, Issa has an origin story. Upon moving to Saint Louis, he started making food for the people in his community. One day a woman came to him and said “what you’re doing is great, but I have a better idea. You should make food for the talibe boys in the city.” He decided, why not try it, and went to the old ferry building to bring the kids food. A day later there were over 100 kids waiting for the sandwich. And after that hundreds more. “Clearly this was a problem,” Issa tells me, and frankly, the rest is history! Years and a whole new location later, the program has expanded into not only a nutrition program, but now a healthcare, education, urban farming, computer literacy, hygiene, and advocacy program.

Most importantly the boys have a voice here. For example, they’re looking at building a new craft/workshop building because the boys want to be able to sell the wonderful crafts they’ve learned to make, helping them to have an income outside of begging.

When a boy wants to devote more time to school, Issa negotiates with their Marabout to allow it. I met at least three boys who were either in school now, or on their way to it. One of them helps Issa with the younger boys in the evenings after coming back from class. 

Everywhere were loud, smiling kids. One of them turned to me “What is your name?” “Paige” “You need a Senegalese name!” “Can you give me one?” He thought for a moment, “Penda!”

Hi my name is Penda and I believe Maison de la Gare is making a huge difference in the life of Talibe boys. 

The boys learn how to use computers (and facebook)
The boys learn how to use computers (and facebook)
All kids love to pose for the camera!
All kids love to pose for the camera!
Issa shows me where the new building will be built
Issa shows me where the new building will be built
The afternoon drum circle!
The afternoon drum circle!
Apr 25, 2014

From the International Space Station to MDG

Chris Hadfield responding to Arouna
Chris Hadfield responding to Arouna's questions

A magical connection for the talibé children

In April 2013 astronaut Chris Hadfield was commander of the International Space Station.  As Chris Hadfield was tweeting his amazing “postcards from space”, photos of our planet taken from his vantage point on the ISS, volunteer Sonia LeRoy was showing them to the talibé children, who were amazed.  They particularly loved the photos of Dakar at night and the Sahara, taken from space.  When Chris Hadfield learned of the talibés and their interest in his photos, he was excited to meet the kids.

Chris Hadfield is a great proponent of advance preparation and contingency planning.  It is in that spirit that there was not only a plan for the call, but also a back up plan, and a back up for the back-up plan.  As it turned out, all that planning was needed.

After viewing Youtube videos of Chris Hadfield’s December 2012 Soyuz launch, footage of his spacewalks and more photos from space, the talibés considered questions that they wanted to ask him.  He received the written list of these questions in advance via email.

The day of the call, the internet at Maison de la Gare’s centre was not working.  Half an hour before the planned Skype connection, fourteen talibés eager to connect with Chris Hadfield packed into taxis for the trip to a local hotel that had a WiFi connection.

The children gathered round the computer in anticipation.  They viewed the space ship launch one more time, and reviewed their questions.  At the designated time, the Skype call from Chris Hadfield began.  Rowan Hughes, a Canadian volunteer who had done much to organize the call, asked the first question to encourage the talibés to follow suit.

Talibé Arouna Kandé, clearly nervous and excited, asked his question (in French): “What made you think you could do something that so few people have ever done?”  Chris Hadfield addressed Arouna directly by name as he replied that, as a nine year old boy, he knew his dream of going to space was likely impossible.  Yet, he nevertheless kept hold of that dream by focusing on the things in his life he could control that would bring him closer to his goal, and not the impossible.  He said “Shape your daily decisions toward your dream.  Turn yourself into your dream one small decision at a time.  And, celebrate the progress of every small change within yourself.”

After Arouna’s question was answered, Skype failed several times.  Fortunately, thanks to advance preparations and Chris Hadfield’s patience and familiarity with unreliable communications when making calls from the International Space Station, the call continued via Skype chat.

Chris Hadfield answered each of the talibé’s questions, emailed earlier, in sequence.  The manner in which he responded to the questions was amazingly relevant to the talibé’s own lives.  One child asked: “When you are afraid, how do you get over it?”  Chris Hadfield replied: “I look to the very core of what I fear.  Not the general fear, but the real root of it.  And then I work to understand that root fear, the real basis of what I fear.  And, I practice how to avoid that fear, and how to best react if I do encounter that fear.  I practice it over and over.  Then, when it really happens, I am not so scared and I respond better.”

The children soaked up Chris Hadfield’s advice, recognizing its significance for them.  His parting advice is excellent for us all: “Practice and learn to make good decisions in your life. After all, we are the result of our decisions.” 

Talibes mesmerized by photos from space in 2013
Talibes mesmerized by photos from space in 2013
Rowan and talibes head to a hotel for the call
Rowan and talibes head to a hotel for the call
Watching Hadfield
Watching Hadfield's launch, waiting for the call
Rowan makes the Skype call to Chris Hadfield
Rowan makes the Skype call to Chris Hadfield
Chris Hadfield on Skype
Chris Hadfield on Skype

Links:

Apr 4, 2014

What Keeps Bringing Me Back to Maison de la Gare

Sonia with begging talibe children in Saint Louis
Sonia with begging talibe children in Saint Louis

I have been travelling to Saint Louis, Senegal, since 2010 as a volunteer and to support Maison de la Gare as a partner.  My father and I do this together. He is a retired scientist and business leader and I work as a financial planner, developing retirement strategies and managing risk for Canadians.  We seemed far from an obvious fit for having something to offer children forced to beg for hours each day in a country far from our home.  But, we kept returning; there was always something more we knew we could do to help, and in 2012 my teenage daughter joined us as a volunteer as well.  I am currently planning my sixth journey to serve the children of Maison de la Gare, again with my father and daughter.

I thought my first trip to Senegal would be my one and only opportunity to contribute in some way to Maison de la Gare and the talibé children.  We brought with us badly needed medical and school supplies.  We visited the daaras to deliver medical care, I taught some French classes, I helped make improvements at the centre, and I tried to show the children that I saw them and valued them.

But I had not been prepared for the overwhelming sense of being completely present and alive that interaction with these beautiful, resilient children gave me.  I had expected to give, not to receive.  And, I could not have anticipated how the grace and dignity with which these children approach the challenges of their unimaginably difficult circumstances would inspire me.

So many of the children begging on the streets, poorly clothed and often shoeless, were of an age with my own son, and my nephews.  I was overwhelmed by a sense that, but for the grace of God, these could be my own kids.  I felt that the chance of being born in Canada to a nurturing family and the opportunity to become educated and build a good life, insulated from challenges such as existed here, did not give me any more right to such a life than these children also had.  It was just chance.  And, I was uplifted by the possibilities that Maison de la Gare could offer these boys; it could be their chance.

I could NOT just do what I could one time, and then forget these beautiful faces, and the possibility they might have for a successful future if only they could also have the chance.  I knew I would be back.

I learned from Issa Kouyaté, Maison de la Gare's indomitable founder and driving force, about the complexity of the forced begging situation in Senegal.  He also educated me about his vision for Maison de la Gare, and its mission to provide hope and opportunity to the children trapped in a life of forced begging, while always working toward some day ending forced begging in Senegal.  I determined to find a way to support Issa and Maison de la Gare and to help implement his important and unique vision.

On subsequent visits, we supported Issa in making his vision reality.  First, he described his hope to build an apprenticeship program, to teach the older kids who had little hope of entering the public school system a viable trade.  We found donors, and several sewing machines were soon in action.  Issa also wanted a garden oasis for the centre, that the children could tend and learn from, and that could provide nourishment for body and soul.  Once I understood Issa's vision, I was able to make a garden plan with the help of local agriculturalists.  When we returned to Canada, a generous donation made it possible to implement the garden plan.  On our next return to Maison de la Gare, seedlings were sprouting, fruit trees were taking root, a first crop of mint and peppers had been harvested, and the children were the ones making it happen.  It was their garden.

Then there was an opportunity to build a medical clinic with the help of a grant from the Canadian Embassy in Senegal.  A medical clinic has also long been part of Issa's vision.  We assisted with the grant application, and found a architect in Ottawa willing to provide required plans at the last minute as a donation to the project.  We arrived back in Saint Louis as the clinic's construction was wrapping up.  As I helped paint the walls and ceilings, talibé children watched and then quietly picked up paint brushes to join in.  They took such pride in painting bright colours carefully and precisely.  It was clear that they understood this place was for them.

As more and more children arrived each day for classes, to be fed, for medical care, and for soccer tournaments, the need for funding expanded.  The Global Fund for Children, GlobalGiving, and the United Nations Anti-Slavery Fund became important partners.  We became better at fundraising, and volunteers from far and wide began to come more regularly, touched as we were by the resilience and hope of these amazing children.

On another visit, my daughter's first, our goal was to help Maison de la Gare expand the library that had been made possible by a generous donation from Sweden.  This time we arrived with books instead of medicine in our bags.  My teenage daughter invited the talibé children to get involved organizing the new books.  Then, she showed them how to set up a gmail address and write an email.  She connected them with her classmates back home in Ottawa, Canada, and a new window to the world had been opened for these children of two very different worlds.

My personal relationships with some of the talibé children have deepened significantly, thanks to on-going emails, Facebook chats and Skype video.  Every day I think of them.  I wonder, is Arouna able to find enough time and peace in his long, hard day to complete his homework?  Did Mamadou have success with the newest crop of melons in the garden?  Who knew Souleymane has the voice of an angel (I saw it posted on YouTube)?  Is Oumar's pain easing from losing his father, then his home and the rest of his family?  Is Kalidou attending classes?  How are those two little four year old boys who are always together, holding hands, adjusting to forced begging and no family?  Who got to play on the Maison de la Gare soccer team this week?  Are they happy?  Are they healthy?

The talibé children of Maison de la Gare are never far from my heart.  I am thankful each day for Issa Kouyaté's dedication, and for the team at Maison de la Gare.  Because of them, these kids are not alone and they don't just have hope for a better life, they have a family after all.

Caring for Djibi
Caring for Djibi's badly infected foot
Preparing plans for the garden in MDG
Preparing plans for the garden in MDG's center
At dinner with teacher Bouri Mbodj and her family
At dinner with teacher Bouri Mbodj and her family
Treating an eye infection in a Saint Louis daara
Treating an eye infection in a Saint Louis daara
Sonia painting Maison de la Gare
Sonia painting Maison de la Gare's new infirmary
Rowan labeling books in MDG library with Kalidou
Rowan labeling books in MDG library with Kalidou
With Arouna in front of his school
With Arouna in front of his school
Hanging out with talibe children in a daara
Hanging out with talibe children in a daara

Links:

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