Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, Int

Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, International, a US-based 501(c)3 organization, helps subsistence farmers displaced by the formation of national parks establish new livelihoods that restore and sustain protected habitats.
Apr 25, 2011

CPALI partners with BEST chocolate!

Women
Women's basket weaving group in Ambalamahago

WOMEN'S PROGRAM UP AND RUNNING!
Mamy, Lalaina and Cecile recently returned from Ambalamahago where they are working to organize a women's basket weaving group.  Just before larvae spin cocoons, farmers place them into "spinning baskets"  to protect them from predators.  The women of the village of Ambalamahago are known for their weaving ability and supply many of the baskets sold in the Maroantsetra market.  Lalaina and Cecile's goal was to introduce the women to the new baskets designed by Denis and Mamy especially for larvae. Their hope is that by organizing local women to make spinning baskets (and earn added income), silk worm rearing activities will be encouraged.  Groups working together to make the needed baskets may become the precursor groups to those who choose to make  textiles and paper. Finally, perhaps the most exciting aspect of  Lalaina and Cecile's project  is its focus on women.  CPALI has not yet implemented activities specifically for women despite the fact that women have a significant effect on the MPA albeit different than that of the men. As can be seen in the picture to the right, at least initially, women's activities need to be village based due to the many children that tie women to their homes.

CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE
Its not to late to order the BEST CHOCOLATE IN THE WORLD for 
your spring and summer celebrations (and give a nod to CPALI!). Madécasse makes chocolate in Madagascar and was recently named One of the 50 Most Innovative Companies in the World by Fast Company Magazine. Organized by two former Peace Corp volunteers, Tim McCollum and Bret Beach, Madécasse invests in small scale,cocoa farmers in Northwestern Madagascar. Tim and Brett not only provide a market for cocoa, but teach the farmers how to process the cocoa and hence earn greater returns. While 70% of the world's cocoa comes from Africa, less than 1% is made there -Tim and Bret's innovations help fight poverty in this tiny corner of the world, and now they are helping CPALI.

Visit the Madécasse website ( http://store.madecasse.com/). And before you place your order, write "cpali" (no caps) in the coupon code/promotional code box. 20% of all chocolate profits will be contributed to CPALI to help us expand our work with silk farmers in Madagascar.

Oblong cacao pod reveals pulpy fruit and beans
Oblong cacao pod reveals pulpy fruit and beans

Links:

Feb 16, 2011

Report on Runway

Team and Textile
Team and Textile

CPALI hits the NY fashion runway

From Maroantsetra to the Meat-packing District.  Children's stories about caterpillars turning into butterflies fabulize the potential of a plain caterpillar to become a colorful delicate creature that beautifies the world. The CPALI silk project reverses the narrative: we are striving to capitalize on the ephemeral creations of high fashion to generate the funds and attention that can preserve nature by benefiting people at the base of the pyramid. Thanks to lots of hard work by farmers and sewers in Madagascar, and help from our new friends in the fashion industry, a piece of wild silk textile made in Maroantsetra appeared in the Meat-packing district in a runway display during the New York, 2011 Fall Fashion Week http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2011/02/14/fashion/201220214SCENE_FW-9.html. 

Early in 2011, Summer Rayne Oakes, the founder of Source4Stylewww.source4style.com introduced Tara St. James, the founder of Study NY www.notjustalabel.com/study_ny to CPALI. Tara used two meters of CPALI's patent-pending, nonwoven textile to make a strikingly beautiful, ethereal skirt that was modeled by Kelly in the Fall 2011 presentation by Study New York. We hope that such exposure and the attention generated by the silk's inclusion in the Source4Style and the Material Connexion libraries will connect us to customers whose purchases will encourage the farmers and the team - According to Mamy, " Everybody is looking at those pictures. Our hope is to get this project improve, and that was good news".  Thank you Tara St. James!


Wild silk in its glory
Wild silk in its glory
Wild silk in its glory
Wild silk in its glory

Links:

Feb 7, 2011

SEPALIMAD organizes lead farmers and our non-spun textile makes the NY fashion runway!

Tara St. James
Tara St. James' skirt from CPALI non-spun textile

Activities are hopping in Madagascar and here at home. SEPALIMAD, the local NOG through which CPALI works is making plans to increase farmer numbers. In the attached newsletter Mamy maps out where 5 lead farmers are organizing teams of 10-20 farmers.  

In addition to expanded farmer networks, we are now producing both silk paper and textile for identified buyers. The team will be shipping samples by the end of February to Greece, England and the US. We are keeping our fingers crossed the buyers will develop exciting new products from them.  The fact that we have had interest in our textile and paper from a diversity of industries (architecture, industrial design, fashion accessories) is quite exciting.

Finally, in a recent trip to New York, I presented CPALI's non-spun textile at a Source4Sustainability exhibition Much to our luck, Tara St. James, winner of the Ecco Doman Fashion Foundation Award for Sustainability,  fell in love with it and has made a long skirt that she will be featuring it in her 14 February Fashion Show.  Needless to say, we are thrilled and will be sending pictures of "CPALI on the runway" from Tara's February show.

All the best,

the CPALI Team

 

"Back at the ranch", so to speak, CPALI Boston is working hard on identifying new markets and buyers for the non-spun silk textile our producers are making, 

Links:


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